Theosophical Glossary Collation

Theosophical Glossary Collation

(From Theosophical University Press)


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List of Abbreviated Titles (in alphabetical order)

  • FY | Five Years of Theosophy – 1885 | H. P. Blavatsky, ed.
  • GH | Gods and Heroes of the Bhagavad Gita – 1939 | Geoffrey A. Barborka
  • IN | An Invitation to the Secret Doctrine – 1988 | Grace F. Knoche, ed.
  • IU | Isis Unveiled – 1877 | H. P. Blavatsky
  • KT | Key to Theosophy – 1889 | H. P. Blavatsky
  • MO | The Masks of Odin – 1985 | Elsa-Brita Titchenell
  • OG | Occult Glossary – 1933, 1996 | G. de Purucker
  • PV | Esotericism of the Popol Vuh – 1979 | Raphael Girard (glossary by Blair A. Moffett)
  • SK | Sanskrit Keys the Wisdom Religion – 1940 | Judith Tyberg
  • SKo | Sanskrit terms from The Ocean of Theosophy, by William Q. Judge, 1893.
  • SKv | Sanskrit terms from The Voice of the Silence, by H. P. Blavatsky, 1889.
  • SKf | Sanskrit terms from Fundamentals of the Esoteric Philosophy, by G. de Purucker, 1932.
  • SKs | Sanskrit terms from The Secret Doctrine, by H. P. Blavatsky, 1888.
  • SP | Sanskrit Pronunciation – 1992 | Bruce Cameron Hall
  • TG | Theosophical Glossary – 1892 | H. P. Blavatsky
  • VS | Voice of the Silence – 1889 | H. P. Blavatsky
  • WG | The Working Glossary – 1892 | W. Q. Judge
  • Compiled by Scott J. Osterhage


  • (TG) A. — The first letter in all the world-alphabets save a few, such for instance as the Mongolian, the Japanese, the Tibetan, the Ethiopian, etc. It is a letter of great mystic power and magic virtue with those who have adopted it, and with whom its numerical value is one It is the Aleph of the Hebrews, symbolized by the Ox or Bull; the Alpha of the Greeks, the one and the first; the Az of the Slavonians, signifying the pronoun I referring to the I am that I am. Even in Astrology, Taurus the Ox or Bull or the Aleph is the first of the Zodiacal signs, its colour being white and yellow. The sacred Aleph acquires a still more marked sanctity with the Christian Kabalists when they learn that this letter typifies the Trinity in Unity, as it is composed of two Yods, one upright, the other reversed with a slanting bar or nexus, . . . Kenneth R.H. Mackenzie states that the St. Andrew cross is occultly connected therewith. The divine name, the first in the series corresponding with Aleph , is AeHeIeH or Ahih, when vowelless, and this is a Sanskrit root.
  • (TG) Aahla {Egyp} . One of the divisions of the Kerneter or infernal regions, or Amenti; the word means the Field of Peace.
  • (TG) Aanroo {Egyp} . The second division of Amenti. The celestial field of Aanroo is encircled by an iron wall. The field is covered with wheat, and the Defunct are represented gleaning it, for the Master of Eternity; some stalks being three, others five, and the highest seven cubits high. Those who reached the last two numbers entered the state of bliss which is called in Theosophy Devachan the disembodied spirits whose harvest was but three cubits high went into lower regions Kamaloka . Wheat was with the Egyptians the symbol of the Law of Retribution or Karma . The cubits had reference to the seven, five and three human principles.
  • (TG) Aaron {Hebr} . The elder brother of Moses and the first Initiate of the Hebrew Lawgiver. The name means the Illuminated , or the Enlightened . Aaron thus heads the line, or Hierarchy, of the initiated Nabim, or Seers.
  • (TG) Ab {Hebr} . The eleventh month of the Hebrew civil year; the fifth of the sacred year beginning in July.
  • (TG) Abaddon {Hebr} . An angel of Hell, corresponding to the Greek Apollyon.
  • (TG) Abatur {Gnos} . In the Nazarene system the Ancient of Days, Antiquus Altus, the Father of the Demiurgus of the Universe, is called the Third Life or Abatur. He corresponds to the Third Logos in the Secret Doctrine . See Codex Nazaraeus .
  • (TG) Abba Amona {Hebr} . Lit., Father-Mother; the occult names of the two higher Sephiroth, Chokmah and Binah , of the upper triad, the apex of which is Sephira or Kether. From this triad issues the lower septenary of the Sephirothal Tree.
  • (TG) Abhamsi {Sans} . A mystic name of the four orders of beings which are, Gods, Demons, Pitris and Men. Orientalists somehow connect the name with waters, but esoteric philosophy connects its symbolism with Akasa — the ethereal waters of space, since it is on the bosom and on the seven planes of space that the four orders of and the three higher Orders of Spiritual Beings are born.
  • (TG) Abhasvaras {Sans} . The Devas or Gods of Light and Sound, the highest of the upper three celestial regions planes of the second Dhyana A class of gods sixty-four in number, representing a certain cycle and an occult number.
  • (TG) Abhava {Sans} . Negation, or non-being of individual objects; the noumenal substance, or abstract objectivity.
  • (FY) Abhava, negation or non-being of individual objects; the substance, the abstract objectivity.
  • (WG) Abhava, non-existence, non-entity; privation, negation, destruction, death. a, not; bhava, being: non-being.
  • (TG) Abhaya {Sans} . Fearlessness — a son of Dharma; and also a religious life of duty. As an adjective, Fearless, Abhaya is an epithet given to every Buddha.
  • (SKs) Abhaya ‘Fearlessness’; a compound of a — not, and bhaya — fear, derived from the verb-root bhi — to fear. Abhaya is also that mental peace and serenity that comes from perfect love, as the Bible says: Perfect love casteth out all fear.
  • (TG) Abhayagiri {Sans} . Lit. , Mount Fearless in Ceylon. It has an ancient Vihara or Monastery in which the well-known Chinese traveller Fa-hien found 5,000 Buddhist priests and ascetics in the year 400 of our era, and a School called Abhayagiri Vasinah , School of the Secret Forest. This philosophical school was regarded as heretical, as the ascetics studied the doctrines of both the greater and the smaller vehicles — or the Mahayana and the Hinayana systems and Triyana or the three successive degrees of Yoga; just as a certain Brotherhood does now beyond the Himalayas. This proves that the disciples of Katyayana were and are as unsectarian as their humble admirers the Theosophists are now. See Sthavirah School. This was the most mystical of all the schools, and renowned for the number of Arhats it produced. The Brotherhood of Abhayagiri called themselves the disciples of Katyayana, the favourite Chela of Gautama, the Buddha. Tradition says that owing to bigoted intolerance and persecution, they left Ceylon and passed beyond the Himalayas, where they have remained ever since.
  • (TG) Abhidharma {Sans} . The metaphysical third part of Tripitaka, a very philosophical Buddhist work by Katyayana.
  • (WG) Abhidharma, the third division of the Tripitaka or Buddhist canon. It contains the philosophical dissertations and metaphysics of the Buddhists, and from it the Mahayana and Hinayana schools got their fundamental doctrines.
  • (TG) Abhijna {Sans} . Six phenomenal or supernatural gifts which Sakyamuni Buddha acquired in the night on which he reached Buddha-ship. This is the fourth degree of Dhyana the seventh in esoteric teachings which has to be attained by every true Arhat. In China, the initiated Buddhist ascetics reckon six such powers, but in Ceylon they reckon only five. The first Abhijna is Divyachakchus, the instantaneous view of anything one wills to see; the second, is Divyasrotra, the power of comprehending any sound whatever, etc., etc.
  • (TG) Abhimanim {Sans} . The name of Agni (fire) the eldest son of Brahma, in other words, the first element or Force produced in the universe at its evolution (the fire of creative desire). By his wife Swaha, Abhimanim had three sons (the fires) Pavaka, Pavamana and Suchi, and these had forty-five sons, who, with the original son of Brahma and his three descendants, constitute the forty-nine fires of Occultism.
  • (TG) Abhimanyu {Sans} . A son of Arjuna. He killed Lakshmana, in the great battle of the Mahabharata on its second day, but was himself killed on the thirteenth.
  • (WG) Abhinivesa, idle terror causing death.
  • (TG) Abhutarajasas {Sans} . A class of gods or Devas, during the period of the fifth Manvantara.
  • (WG) Abhutarajasas, bright incorporeal beings, deities having not even astral forms. a, not; bhuta, element; raj , shine
  • (WG) Abhyasana, uninterrupted contemplation of an object. abhi, into; asa , throwing: throwing one’s self into study
  • (TG) Abib {Hebr} . The first Jewish sacred month, begins in March; is also called Nisan .
  • (TG) Abiegnus Mons {Latin} . A mystic name, from whence as from a certain mountain, Rosicrucian documents are often found to be issued — Monte Abiegno. There is a connection with Mount Meru, and other sacred hills.
  • (TG) Ab-i-hayat {Pers} . Water of immortality. Supposed to give eternal youth and sempiternal life to him who drinks of it.
  • (FY) Ab-e-Hyat, Water of Life, supposed to give eternal youth.
  • (TG) Abiri {Greek} . See Kabiri, also written Kabeiri, the Mighty Ones, celestials, sons of Zedec the just one, a group of deities worshipped in Phoenicia: they seem to be identical with the Titans, Corybantes, Curetes, Telchines and Dii Magni of Virgil.
  • (TG) Ablanathanalba {Gnos} . A term similar to Abracadabra. It is said by C. W. King to have meant thou art a father to us; it reads the same from either end and was used as a charm in Egypt
  • (TG) Abracadabra {Gnos} . This symbolic word first occurs in a medical treatise in verse by Samonicus, who flourished in the reign of the Emperor Septimus Severus. Godfrey Higgins says it is from Abra or Abar God, in Celtic, and cad holy; it was used as a charm, and engraved on Kameas as an amulet. Godfrey Higgins was nearly right, as the word Abracadabra is a later corruption of the sacred Gnostic term Abrasax, the latter itself being a still earlier corruption of a sacred and ancient Coptic or Egyptian word: a magic formula which meant in its symbolism Hurt me not, and addressed the deity in its hieroglyphics as Father. It was generally attached to an amulet or charm and worn as a Tat , on the breast under the garments.
  • (TG) Abraxas or Abrasax {Gnos} . Mystic words which have been traced as far back as Basilides, the Pythagorean, of Alexandria, A.D. 90. He uses Abraxas as a title for Divinity, the supreme of Seven, and as having 365 virtues. In Greek numeration, a . 1, b . 2, r . 100, a . 1, x . 60, a . 1, s . 200 = 365, days of the year, solar year, a cycle of divine action. C. W. King, author of The Gnostics, considers the word similar to the Hebrew Shemhamphorasch, a holy word, the extended name of God. An Abraxas Gem usually shows a man’s body with the head of a cock, one arm with a shield, the other with a whip. Abraxas is the counterpart of the Hindu Abhimanim and Brahma combined. It is these compound and mystic qualities which caused Oliver, the great Masonic authority, to connect the name of Abraxas with that of Abraham. This was unwarrantable; the virtues and attributes of Abraxas, which are 365 in number, ought to have shown him that the deity was connected with the Sun and solar division of the year — nay, that Abraxas is the antitype, and the Sun, the type.
  • (TG) Absoluteness. When predicated of the UNIVERSAL PRINCIPLE, it denotes an abstract noun, which is more correct and logical than to apply the adjective absolute to that which has neither attributes nor limitations, nor can IT have any.
  • (KT) Absoluteness. When predicated of the UNIVERSAL PRINCIPLE, it denotes an abstraction, which is more correct and logical than to apply the adjective absolute to that which can have neither attributes nor limitations.
  • (WG) Absolute, anything of which it can be predicated that it is not relative. In pure metaphysics that which exists independent of any other cause; unconditioned. Hence the same as Parabrahmam, or the unknowable. That state or condition into which it is said the manifested universe disappears upon the great Pralaya. Said to be, by some, the combination of Spirit and Matter.
  • (OG) Absolute — A term which unfortunately is much abused and often misused even in theosophical writings. It is a convenient word in Occidental philosophy by which is described the utterly unconditioned; but it is a practice which violates both the etymology of the word and even the usage of some keen and careful thinkers as, for instance, Sir William Hamilton in his Discussions (3rd edition, p.13n), who apparently uses the word absolute in the exactly correct sense in which theosophists should use it as meaning finished, perfected, completed. As Hamilton observes: The Absolute is diametrically opposed to, is contradictory of, the Infinite. This last statement is correct, and in careful theosophical writings the word Absolute should be used in Hamilton’s sense, as meaning that which is freed, unloosed, perfected, completed. Absolute is from the Latin absolutum , meaning freed, unloosed, and is, therefore, an exact English parallel of the Sanskrit philosophical term moksha or mukti, and more mystically of the Sanskrit term so commonly found in Buddhist writings especially, nirvana — an extremely profound and mystical thought. Hence, to speak of parabrahman as being the Absolute may be a convenient usage for Occidentals who understand neither the significance of the term parabrahman nor the etymology, origin, and proper usage of the English word Absolute — proper outside of a common and familiar employment. In strict accuracy, therefore, the student should use the word Absolute only when he means what the Hindu philosopher means when he speaks of moksha or mukti or of a mukta — i.e., one who has obtained mukti or freedom, one who has arrived at the acme or summit of all evolution possible in any one hierarchy, although as compared with hierarchies still more sublime, such jivanmukta is but a mere beginner. The Silent Watcher in theosophical philosophy is an outstanding example of one who can be said to be absolute in the fully accurate meaning of the word. It is obvious that the Silent Watcher is not parabrahman.
  • (TG) Ab-Soo {Chald} . The mystic name for Space, meaning the dwelling of Ab the Father, or the Head of the source of the Waters of Knowledge. The lore of the latter is concealed in the invisible space or akasic regions.
  • (TG) Acacia {Greek} . Innocence; and also a plant used in Freemasonry as a symbol of initiation, immortality, and purity; the tree furnished the sacred Shittim wood of the Hebrews.
  • (TG) Achamoth {Gnos} . The name of the second, the inferior Sophia. Esoterically and with the Gnostics, the elder Sophia was the Holy Spirit (female Holy Ghost) or the Sakti of the Unknown, and the Divine Spirit; while Sophia Achamoth is but the personification of the female aspect of the creative male Force in nature; also the Astral Light.
  • (TG) Achar {Hebr} . The Gods over whom (according to the Jews) Jehovah is the God.
  • (TG) Achara {Sans} . Personal and social (religious) obligations.
  • (TG) Acharya {Sans} . Spiritual teacher, Guru; as Sankar- acharya, lit. , a teacher of ethics. A name generally given to Initiates, etc., and meaning Master.
  • (WG) Acharya, a holy teacher; an instructor in the mysteries. Literally, one who knows the achara, or rules
  • (TG) Achath {Hebr} . The one , the first, feminine; achad being masculine. A Talmudic word applied to Jehovah. It is worthy of note that the Sanskrit term ak means one, ekata being unity, Brahma being called ak , or eka, the one, the first, whence the Hebrew word and application.
  • (TG) Acher {Hebr} . The Talmudic name of the Apostle Paul. The Talmud narrates the story of the four Tanaim, who entered the Garden of Delight, i.e ., came to be initiated; Ben Asai, who looked and lost his sight; Ben Zoma, who looked and lost his reason; Acher, who made depredations in the garden and failed; and Rabbi Akiba, who alone succeeded. The Kabalists say that Acher is Paul.
  • (TG) Acheron {Greek} . One of the rivers of Hades in Greek mythology.
  • (TG) Achit {Sans} . Absolute non -intelligence; as Chit is — in contrast — absolute intelligence.
  • (WG) Achit, one of the three inseparable aspects of Parabrahmam. a, devoid of; chit , thought, intelligent force, mind
  • (TG) Achyuta {Sans} . That which is not subject to change or fall; the opposite to Chyuta , fallen. A title of Vishnu.
  • (WG) Achyuta, the unfailing, that which is not subject to fall; a title given to Krishna in the Bhagavat-Gita; a name of Vishnu.
  • (GH) Achyuta The unfallen, i.e. , the imperishable: a philosophical term about which H. P. Blavatsky writes: Achyuta is an almost untranslatable term. It means that which is not subject to fall or change for the worse: the Unfalling; and it is the reverse of chyuta, ‘the Fallen.’ The Dhyanis who incarnate in the human forms of the Third Root-Race and endow them with intellect (Manas) are called the chyuta, for they fall into generation. ( Secret Doctrine, II, p. 47) Achyuta is applied to Vishnu, and to Krishna in his avataric aspect of Vishnu: not, however, as an individualized entity but in respect to the condition or state of essential Cosmic Being. (Compound a , not; chyuta from (The following word is derived from the verbal root:) chyu, to move to and fro, to fall, to fade. Bhagavad-Gita , W. Q. Judge, p. 132)
  • (TG) Acosmism {Greek} . The precreative period, when there was no Kosmos but Chaos alone.
  • (TG) Ad {assyr} . Ad, the Father. In Aramean ad means one, and ad-ad the only one.
  • (TG) Adah {assyr} . Borrowed by the Hebrews for the name of their Adah, father of Jubal, etc. But Adah meaning the first, the one, is universal property. There are reasons to think that Ak-ad, means the first -born or Son of Ad . Adon was the first Lord of Syria.
  • (TG) Adam {Hebr} . In the Kabalah Adam is the only-begotten, and means also red earth. It is almost identical with Athamas or Thomas, and is rendered into Greek by Didumos, the twin — Adam, the first, in chap. I of Genesis , being shown, male-female.
  • (WG) Adam, the first man in the Hebraic system. The word really means Man and not a man.
  • (TG) Adam Kadmon {Hebr} Archetypal Man; Humanity. The Heavenly Man not fallen into sin; Kabalists refer it to the Ten Sephiroth on the plane of human perception. In the Kabalah Adam Kadmon is the manifested Logos corresponding to our Third Logos; the Unmanifested being the first paradigmic ideal Man, and symbolizing the Universe in abscondito, or in its privation in the Aristotelean sense. The First Logos is the Light of the World, the Second and the Third — its gradually deepening shadows.
  • (KT) Adam Kadmon {Hebr} Archetypal man, Humanity. The Heavenly man not fallen into sin. Kabalists refer it to the Ten Sephiroth on the plane of human perception. In the Kabala Adam Kadmon is the manifested Logos corresponding to our third Logos, the unmanifested being the first paradigmic ideal man, and symbolizing the universe in abscondito, or in its privation in the Aristotelean sense. The first Logos is the light of the World, the second and the third, its gradually deepening shadows.
  • (FY) Adam Kadmon, the bi-sexual Sephira of the Kabalists.
  • (WG) Adam Kadmon, in the Kabalah, the Heavenly Man; Humanity in its ideal form, for Adam Kadmon is said to stand with his head in heaven and his feet on earth.
  • (IN) Adam Kadmon {Hebr} In the Kabbalah, archetypal or primordial humanity, macrocosmic or Heavenly Man in contradistinction to the earthly Adam; the Sephirothal Tree of Life.
  • (TG) Adamic Earth #6nn Called the true oil of gold or the primal element in Alchemy. It is but one remove from the pure homogeneous element.
  • (TG) Adbhuta Brahmana {Sans} . The Brahmana of miracles; treats of marvels, auguries, and various phenomena.
  • (TG) Adbhuta Dharma {Sans} . The law of things never heard before. A class of Buddhist works on miraculous or phenomenal events.
  • (TG) Adept {Latin} . Adeptus , He who has obtained. In Occultism one who has reached the stage of Initiation, and become a Master in the science of Esoteric philosophy.
  • (KT) Adept ( Latim adeptus ). In Occultism, one who has reached the stage of initiation and become a master in the Science of Esoteric Philosophy.
  • (FY) Adept, one who, through the development of his spirit, has attained to transcendental knowledge and powers.
  • (WG) Adept #6nn, as used in these times is applied to the Mahatmas, but as there are black and white, high and low Adepts, that use is erroneous. The word strictly means an expert or master in some particular art or science. In Theosophical literature the term is generally applied to those occultists who have passed beyond the age of pupilage and have, so to speak, come of age in the study and practice of occultism, being more than chelas but less than full Initiates.
  • (OG) Adept — The word means one who is skilled; hence, even in our ordinary life, a chemist, a physician, a theologian, a mechanic, an engineer, a teacher of languages, an astronomer, are all adepts, persons who are skilled, each in his own profession. In theosophical writings, however, an Adept is one who is skilled in the esoteric wisdom, in the teachings of life.
  • (TG) Adharma {Sans} . Unrighteousness, vice, the opposite of Dharma.
  • (WG) Adharma, unrighteousness, wickedness, vice.
  • (TG) Adhi {Sans} . Supreme, paramount.
  • (TG) Adhi-bhautika duhkha {Sans} . The second of the three kinds of pain; lit., Evil proceeding from external things or beings.
  • (FY) Adhibhautika, arising from external objects.
  • (WG) Adhibautika, natural; a term applied to natural and extrinsic pain.
  • (WG) Adhibhuta, the lord of lives; the Supreme Spirit when dwelling in all elemental nature through the mysterious power of -nature’s illusion. ( adhi, over; bhuta, element
  • (GH) Adhibhuta literally ‘Original Element,’ i.e., the primordial substratum or element of matter and all objects, in its cosmic aspect. (Compound adhi ‘above,’ therefore implying superiority; bhuta, a word frequently used for ‘element.’ Bhagavad-Gita , W. Q. Judge, p. 57)
  • (FY) Adhidaivika, arising from the gods, or accidents.
  • (WG) Adhidaivata, (also Adhidaiva), presiding deity, lord of all the gods; the Supreme Spirit as dwelling in the solar orb (meaning, according to Eastern ideas, that the supreme power for this solar system has its place in the sun), or when fully manifest in man. ( adhi, over; deva, a god
  • (GH) Adhidaivata literally The original or primordial divine, i.e., the divine agent operating in and through beings and objects. A generalizing adjective applying to the divine part of any being from the hierarchical standpoint: applicable to Adhyatman . (Compound adhi above, therefore implying superiority; daivata , divine. Bhagavad-Gita, W. Q. Judge, p. 57)
  • (WG) Adhidaivika, spiritual; a term applied to superhuman pain.
  • (TG) Adhi-daivika duhkha {Sans} . The third of the three kinds of pain. Evil proceeding from divine causes, or a just Karmic punishment.
  • (FY) Adhikamasansas, extra months.
  • (IN) Adi-Sanat {Sans} First Ancient, title of Brahma, highest manifesting divinity.
  • (TG) Adhishtanam {Sans} . Basis; a principle in which some other principle inheres.
  • (FY) Adhishthanam, basis; a principle in which some other principle inheres.
  • (WG) Adhiyajna, the Supreme Spirit as director of the body, as it is held in the ancient doctrine that one spirit guides all men, assuming in each an apparent separateness which is due to the personal lower self. ( adhi , over; yajna, sacrificial ceremony: director of the sacrificial ceremony — which is human life
  • (GH) Adhiyajna literally ‘Primordial sacrifice.’ Cosmologically this refers to the Cosmic Logos, which in the Esoteric Philosophy is represented as in a sense sacrificing itself for the benefit of the world; because due to its own coming into manifestation it enables the waiting hosts of monads to come into being. In the small, every Avatara repeats the sacrifice for the benefit of all that lives. The Bhagavad-Gita refers to this in the words Adhiyajna is myself in this body, i.e., Krishna the Avatara in a physical body. (Compound adhi upper, paramount; yajna, sacrifice. Bhagavad-Gita , W. Q. Judge, p. 58)
  • (WG) Adhyatma, the soul of souls; the over-soul. ( adhi, over; atma , soul
  • (GH) Adhyatman literally ‘The Supreme or Original Atman,’ the highest of a hierarchy, equivalent to Paramatman. (Compound adhi above, therefore implying superiority; atman, Self. Bhagavad-Gita , W. Q. Judge, p. 57)
  • (TG) Adhyatmika duhkha {Sans} . The first of the three kinds of pain; lit., Evil proceeding from Self, an induced or a generated evil by Self, or man himself.
  • (FY) Adhyatmika, arising out of the inner self.
  • (WG) Adhyatmika, relating to the soul (adhyatma); a term applied to natural and inseparable pain.
  • (TG) Adhyatma Vidya {Sans} . Lit., the esoteric luminary. One of the Pancha Vidya Sastras, or the Scriptures of the Five Sciences.
  • (SKv) Adhyaya A chapter of a book; a lesson, a reading: derived from adhi — towards, and the verb-root i — to go; but meaning in combination ‘to study, to turn the minds towards.’
  • (TG) Adi {Sans} . The First, the primeval.
  • (TG) Adi (the Sons of). In Esoteric philosophy the Sons of Adi are called the Sons of the Fire-mist. A term used of certain adepts.
  • (WG) Adi, the first, the beginning; the unknown Deity, Brahma.
  • (TG) Adi-bhuta {Sans} . The first Being; also primordial element. Adbhuta is a title of Vishnu, the first Element containing all elements, the unfathomable deity.
  • (TG) Adi-Buddha {Sans} . The First and Supreme Buddha — not recognised in the Southern Church. The Eternal Light.
  • (WG) Adibuddha, the first or supreme Buddha. Buddha in reality is not a person, but a principle incarnating in different so-called Buddhas.
  • (WG) Adi-Buddha, first or primeval wisdom; an aspect of Parabrahmam. ( adi, first; buddha, wisdom
  • (SKv) Adi-Buddha Adi-Buddha is the ‘Primeval or First Buddha,’ the highest individualized being of the Hierarchy of Wisdom and Compassion in our Solar Universe. The divine nature of this ‘Wondrous Being’ or ‘Silent Watcher,’ as H. P. Blavatsky calls this great being of Light and Truth, permeates all beings, and hence like the Buddha, all men may raise themselves, if they will, to the divine source within them and thus commune with the Supreme Lord who is of the same essence. This Supreme Lord as well as the Divine Monad in man is sometimes given the title of Isvara or Avalokitesvara.
  • (SKf) Adi-Buddha, Dhyani-Buddha , Dhyani-Bodhisattva, Manushya-Buddha In Trans-Himalayan Buddhism and in the Esoteric Philosophy these four classes of spiritual beings belong to the Hierarchy of Compassionate Guardians of this planet and its inhabitants. Adi-Buddha, the summit of Primeval Wisdom, is the Silent Watcher of the whole Earth Planetary Chain. He is often referred to as the ‘Wondrous Being,’ or as the Logos by the Greeks. The Dhyani-Buddhas watch over the Rounds or great Life-Cycles of this Planet. The Dhyani-Bodhisattvas watch over the Globes of the Earth Planetary Chain. The Manushya-Buddhas are the Guardians and Inspirers of the great Root-Races on each Globe of our Earth Planetary Chain. Gautama the Buddha was one of these Manushya-Buddhas. Manushya is the adjectival form of manushya — man, derived from the verb-root man — to think.
  • (TG) Adi-budhi {Sans} . Primeval Intelligence or Wisdom; the eternal Budhi or Universal Mind. Used of Divine Ideation, Mahabuddhi being synonymous with MAHAT.
  • (WG) Adi-buddhi, the first or unmanifested consciousness.
  • (SP) Adi-buddhi — original intelligence.
  • (TG) Adikrit {Sans} . Lit. , the first produced or made. The creative Force eternal and uncreate, but manifesting periodically. Applied to Vishnu slumbering on the waters of space during pralaya .
  • (TG) Adi-natha {Sans} . The first Lord — Adi first natha Lord.
  • (TG) Adi-nidana {Sans} . First and Supreme Causality, from Adi, the first, and Nidana the principal cause (or the concatenation of cause and effect).
  • (TG) Adi-Sakti {Sans} . Primeval, divine Force; the female creative power, and aspect in and of every male god. The Sakti in the Hindu Pantheon is always the spouse of some god.
  • (TG) Adi-Sanat {Sans} . Lit. , First Ancient. The term corresponds to the Kabalistic ancient of days, since it is a title of Brahma — called in the Zohar the Atteekah d’Atteekeen , or the Ancient of the Ancients, etc.
  • (WG) Adi-sanat, the first ancient, Brahma, the creator.
  • (TG) Aditi {Sans} . The Vedic name for the Mulaprakriti of the Vedantists; the abstract aspect of Parabrahman, though both unmanifested and unknowable. In the Vedas Aditi is the Mother-Goddess, her terrestrial symbol being infinite and shoreless space.
  • (WG) Aditi, the boundless, i . e ., space; aether; akasa; Vedic name for mulaprakriti; abstract space, or ideal nature, corresponding with the Egyptian Isis, the female side of procreative nature.
  • (SKs) Aditi, Aditya Aditi is ‘Boundless Infinitude’; a compound of a — not, diti — limit; hence in compound, ‘unlimited.’ Ancient mystics called Aditi ‘the Divine Mother of every existing being.’ In a still deeper sense Aditi represents ‘Divine Wisdom.’ Aditya, meaning ‘born of Aditi,’ is one of the names given to the sun. The seven Adityas or ‘Sons of Aditi’ are the seven gods whose bodies or dwellings are the seven planets of our Solar System. Some of the more mystical writings speak of twelve Adityas or Planetary Gods. Esoteric philosophy teaches that five of these twelve planets are invisible to us at present.
  • (TG) Aditi-Gaea. A compound term, Sanskrit and Latin, meaning dual, nature in theosophical writings — spiritual and physical, as Gaea is the goddess of the earth and of objective nature.
  • (TG) Aditya {Sans} . A name of the Sun; as Marttanda, he is the Son of Aditi.
  • (TG) Adityas {Sans} . The seven sons of Aditi; the seven planetary gods.
  • (WG) Adityas, the twelve sun-gods who bring about the universal conflagration of this solar system.
  • (GH) Adityas The twelve great gods of the Hindu pantheon, sometimes also reckoned as seven (as in early Vedic times, and named, Varuna, the chief, Mitra, Aryaman, Bhaga, Daksha, Ansa, Surya): sons of boundless infinitude (Aditi). These great gods have been known under many names in different kalpas: they are the eternal sustainers of the divine life which exists in all things. The wise call our fathers Vasus; our paternal grandfathers Rudras; our paternal great grandfathers, Adityas; agreeable to a text of the Vedas. (The Laws of Manu (Manava-Dharma-Sastra), pp. iii, p. 284) Astronomically, the seven Adityas are the regents of the seven planets. ( Secret Doctrine, I, p. 99) (Meaning of the word itself: belonging or coming from Aditi. Bhagavad-Gita, W. Q. Judge, p. 73)
  • (TG) Adi Varsha {Sans} . The first land; the primordial country in which dwelt the first races.
  • (WG) Adi-varsha, the first country; the Eden of the first races.
  • (TG) Adonai {Hebr} . The same as Adonis. Commonly translated Lord. Astronomically — the Sun. When a Hebrew in reading came to the name IHVH, which is called Jehovah, he paused and substituted the word Adonai, (Adni); but when written with the points of Alhim, he called it Elohim.
  • (WG) Adonai, a Hebrew word, meaning Lord, which was used in reading the sacred scrolls as a substitute for the unutterable name of four letters, the J-H-V-H. This term was used by mediaeval writers as a name for certain classes of the Dhyan Chohans.
  • (TG) Adonim-Adonai, Adon. The ancient Chaldeo-Hebrew names for the Elohim or creative terrestrial forces, synthesized by Jehovah.
  • (WG) Adrishta, unseen; beyond reach of consciousness; the merit or demerit attaching to a man’s conduct in a former incarnation, and the corresponding (apparently arbitrary) punishment or reward in the present or a future incarnation; destiny.
  • (TG) Adwaita {Sans} . A Vedanta sect. The non-dualistic (A-dwaita) school of Vedantic philosophy founded by Sankaracharya, the greatest of the historical Brahmin sages. The two other schools are the Dwaita (dualistic) and the Visishtadwaita; all the three call themselves Vedantic.
  • (WG) Advaita, non-duality; the one secondless existence, the one reality; a system of philosophy based on non-duality.
  • (TG) Adwaitin {Sans} . A follower of the said school.
  • (FY) Advaiti, a follower of the school of Philosophy established by Sankaracharya.
  • (FY) Advaiti, a follower of the school of Philosophy established by Sankaracharya.
  • (TG) Adytum {Greek} . The Holy of Holies in the pagan temples. A name for the secret and sacred precincts or the inner chamber, into which no profane could enter; it corresponds to the sanctuary of the altars of Christian Churches.
  • (TG) Aebel-Zivo {Gnos} . The Metatron or anointed spirit with the Nazarene Gnostics; the same as the angel Gabriel.
  • (TG) Aeolus {Greek} . The god who, according to Hesiod, binds and looses the winds; the king of storms and winds. A king of Aeolia, the inventor of sails and a great astronomer, and therefore deified by posterity.
  • (TG) Aeon or Aeons {Greek} . Periods of time; emanations proceeding from the divine essence, and celestial beings; genii and angels with the Gnostics.
  • (WG) Aeons, periods of time of such duration as to be incomprehensible; also celestial beings.
  • (TG) Aesir #94 . The same as Ases, the creative Forces personified. The gods who created the black dwarfs or the Elves of Darkness in Asgard. The divine Aesir, the Ases are the Elves of Light. An allegory bringing together darkness which comes from light, and matter born of spirit.
  • (MO) Aesir {Nors} (ay-seer) deities.
  • (TG) Aether {Greek} . With the ancients the divine luminiferous substance which pervades the whole universe, the garment of the Supreme Deity, Zeus, or Jupiter. With the moderns, AEther, for the meaning of which in physics and chemistry In esotericism ether is the third principle of the Kosmic Septenary; the Earth being the lowest, then the Astral Light, Ether and Akasa ( phonetically akasha ) the highest.
  • (KT) Aether ( Gr. ) With the Ancients, the Divine luminiferous substance which pervades the whole universe; the garment of the Supreme Deity, Zeus, or Jupiter. With the Moderns, Ether, for the meaning of which, in physics and chemistry, In Esotericism, AEther is the third principle of the Kosmic Septenary, matter (earth) being the lowest, and Akasa, the highest.
  • (WG) Aether, same as Ether . The great luminiferous substance throughout the whole universe. Astral Light, Akasa , and the like are forms of Aether.
  • (TG) Aethrobacy {Greek} . Lit. , walking on, or being lifted into the air with no visible agent at work; levitation. It may be conscious or unconscious; in the one case it is magic, in the other either disease or a power which requires a few words of elucidation. We know that the earth is a magnetic body; in fact, as some scientists have found, and as Paracelsus affirmed some 300 years ago, it is one vast magnet. It is charged with one form of electricity — let us call it positive — which it evolves continuously by spontaneous action, in its interior or centre of motion. Human bodies, in common with all other forms of matter, are charged with the opposite form of electricity, the negative. That is to say, organic or inorganic bodies, if left to themselves will constantly and involuntarily charge themselves with and evolve the form of electricity opposite to that of the earth itself. Now, what is weight? Simply the attraction of the earth. Without the attraction of the earth you would have no weight, says Professor Stewart; and if you had an earth twice as heavy as this, you would have double the attraction. How then, can we get rid of this attraction? According to the electrical law above stated, there is an attraction between our planet and the organisms upon it, which keeps them upon the surface of the globe. But the law of gravitation has been counteracted in many instances, by levitation of persons and inanimate objects. How account for this? The condition of our physical systems, say theurgic philosophers, is largely dependent upon the action of our will. If well-regulated, it can produce miracles; among others a change of this electrical polarity from negative to positive; the man’s relations with the earth-magnet would then become repellent, and gravity for him would have ceased to exist. It would then be as natural for him to rush into the air until the repellent force had exhausted itself, as, before, it had been for him to remain upon the ground. The altitude of his levitation would be measured by his ability, greater or less, to charge his body with positive electricity. This control over the physical forces once obtained, alteration of his levity or gravity would be as easy as breathing.
  • (IU) Aethrobacy, is the Greek name for walking or being lifted in the air; levitation, so-called, among modern spiritualists. It may be either conscious or unconscious; in the one case, it is magic; in the other, either disease or a power which requires a few words of elucidation. A symbolical explanation of aethrobacy is given in an old Syriac manuscript which was translated in the fifteenth century by one Malchus, an alchemist. In connection with the case of Simon Magus, one passage reads thus: Simon, laying his face upon the ground, whispered in her ear, ‘O mother Earth, give me, I pray thee, some of thy breath; and I will give thee mine; let me loose, O mother, that I may carry thy words to the stars, and I will return faithfully to thee after a while.’ And the Earth strengthening her status, none to her detriment, sent her genius to breathe of her breath on Simon, while he breathed on her; and the stars rejoiced to be visited by the mighty One.
  • The starting-point here is the recognized electro-chemical principle that bodies similarly electrified repel each other, while those differently electrified mutually attract. The most elementary knowledge of chemistry, says Professor Cooke, shows that, while radicals of opposite natures combine most eagerly together, two metals, or two closely-allied metalloids, show but little affinity for each other. The earth is a magnetic body; in fact, as some scientists have found, it is one vast magnet, as Paracelsus affirmed some 300 years ago. It is charged with one form of electricity — let us call it positive — which it evolves continuously by spontaneous action, in its interior or centre of motion. Human bodies, in common with all other forms of matter, are charged with the opposite form of electricity — negative. That is to say, organic or inorganic bodies, if left to themselves will constantly and involuntarily charge themselves with, and evolve the form of electricity opposed to that of the earth itself. Now, what is weight? Simply the attraction of the earth. Without the attractions of the earth you would have no weight, says Professor Stewart, and if you had an earth twice as heavy as this you would have double the attraction. can we get rid of this attraction? According to the electrical law above stated, there is an attraction between our planet and the organisms upon it, which holds them upon the surface of the ground. But the law of gravitation has been counteracted in many instances, by levitations of persons and inanimate objects; how account for this? The condition of our physical systems, say theurgic philosophers, is largely dependent upon the action of our will. If well-regulated, it can produce miracles; among others a change of this electrical polarity from negative to positive; the man’s relations with the earth-magnet would then become repellent, and gravity for him would have ceased to exist. It would then be as natural for him to rush into the air until the repellent force had exhausted itself, as, before, it had been for him to remain upon the ground. The altitude of his levitation would be measured by his ability, greater or less, to charge his body with positive electricity. This control over the physical forces once obtained, alteration of his levity or gravity would be as easy as breathing. The study of nervous diseases has established that even in ordinary somnambulism, as well as in mesmerized somnambulists, the weight of the body seems to be diminished. Professor Perty mentions a somnambulist, Koehler, who when in the water could not sink, but floated. The seeress of Prevorst rose to the surface of the bath and could not be kept seated in it. He speaks of Anna Fleischer, who being subject to epileptic fits, was often seen by the Superintendent to rise in the air; and was once, in the presence of two trustworthy witnesses (two deans) and others, raised two and a half yards from her bed in a horizontal position. The similar case of Margaret Rule is cited by Upham in his History of Salem Witchcraft . In ecstatic subjects, adds Professor Perty, the rising in the air occurs much more frequently than with somnambulists. We are so accustomed to consider gravitation as being a something absolute and unalterable, that the idea of a complete or partial rising in opposition to it seems inadmissible; nevertheless, there are phenomena in which, by means of material forces, gravitation is overcome. In several diseases — as, for instance, nervous fever — the weight of the human body seems to be increased, but in all ecstatic conditions to be diminished. And there may, likewise, be other forces than material ones which can counteract this power. A Madrid journal, El Criterio Espiritista, of a recent date, reports the case of a young peasant girl near Santiago, which possesses a peculiar interest in this connection. Two bars of magnetized iron held over her horizontally, half a metre distant, was sufficient to suspend her body in the air. Were our physicians to experiment on such levitated subjects, it would be found that they are strongly charged with a similar form of electricity to that of the spot, which, according to the law of gravitation, ought to attract them, or rather prevent their levitation. And, if some physical nervous disorder, as well as spiritual ecstasy produce unconsciously to the subject the same effects, it proves that if this force in nature were properly studied, it could be regulated at will.
  • (TG) Afrits {Arabic} for native spirits regarded as devils by Mussulmen. Elementals much dreaded in Egypt.
  • (WG) Agami, one of the three sorts of karma. ( a, not; gami , going
  • (TG) Agapae {Greek} . Love Feasts; the early Christians kept such festivals in token of sympathy, love and mutual benevolence. It became necessary to abolish them as an institution, because of great abuse; Paul in his First Epistle to the Corinthians complains of misconduct at the feasts of the Christians.
  • (TG) Agastya {Sans} . The name of a great Rishi, much revered in Southern India; the reputed author of hymns in the Rig Veda, and a great hero in the Ramayana . In Tamil literature he is credited with having been the first instructor of the Dravidians in science, religion and philosophy. It is also the name of the star Canopus.
  • (TG) Agathodaemon {Greek} . The beneficent, good Spirit as contrasted with the bad one, Kakodaemon. The Brazen Serpent of the Bible is the former; the flying serpents of fire are an aspect of Kakodaemon. The Ophites called Agathodaemon the Logos and Divine Wisdom, which in the Bacchanalian Mysteries was represented by a serpent erect on a pole.
  • (TG) Agathon {Greek} . Plato’s Supreme Deity. Lit., The Good, our ALAYA, or Universal Soul.
  • (KT) Agathon ( Gr. ) Plato’s Supreme Deity, Lit. the good. Our ALAYA or the Soul of the World. Kabbalistic names for Sephira, called also the Crown, or Kether .
  • (TG) Agla {Hebr} . This Kabbalistic word is a talisman composed of the initials of the four words Ateh {Hebr} Gibor {Hebr} Leolam {Hebr} Adonai, {Hebr} meaning Thou art mighty for ever O Lord MacGregor Mathers explains it thus: A, the first; A, the last; G, the trinity in unity; L, the completion of the great work.
  • (MO) Ager {Nors} (ay-gear) [a titan or giant] Space: brewer of mead for the gods
  • (MO) Agnar {Nors} (ang-nar) Name of two early humanities; one was taught by Grimner (Odin)
  • (TG) Agneyastra {Sans} . The fiery missiles or weapons used by the Gods in the exoteric Puranas and the Mahabharata ; the magic weapons said to have been wielded by the adept-race (the fourth), the Atlanteans. This weapon of fire was given by Bharadwaja to Agnivesa, the son of Agni, and by him to Drona, though the Vishnu Purana contradicts this, saying that it was given by the sage Aurva to King Sagara, his chela. They are frequently mentioned in the Mahabharata and the Ramayana .
  • (TG) Agni {Sans} . The God of Fire in the Veda; the oldest and the most revered of Gods in India. He is one of the three great deities: Agni, Vayu and Surya, and also all the three, as he is the triple aspect of fire; in heaven as the Sun; in the atmosphere or air (Vayu), as Lightning; on earth, as ordinary Fire. Agni belonged to the earlier Vedic Trimurti before Vishnu was given a place of honour and before Brahma and Siva were invented.
  • (WG) Agni, name of a god; fire, especially fire from heaven; sometimes indirectly signifying Parabrahmam.
  • (GH) Agni The god of fire: one of the most important of the Vedic deities, to whom the greatest number of hymns are addressed, for he presides chiefly over the earth, and is regarded as the mediator between men and the gods, as protector of men and their homes, and as witness of all their actions. Fire is regarded in three phases: in heaven as the sun, in the air as lightning, and on earth as ordinary fire. Agni is represented as clothed in black, having smoke for his standard and head-piece, and carrying a flaming javelin; he has four hands and seven tongues, with which he licks up the butter used in sacrifices. His chariot is drawn by red horses; the seven winds form the wheels of his car, and he is followed by a ram. Esoterically Agni represents the divine essence present in every atom of the universe, the Celestial Fire; hence in its manifestations Agni is often used synonymously with the Adityas or our spiritual Pitris . In this sense Fire is spoken of as the PRIMARY in the Stanzas of Dzyan: The Spirit, beyond manifested Nature, is the fiery BREATH in its absolute Unity. In the manifested Universe, it is the Central Spiritual Sun, the electric Fire of all Life. In our System it is the visible Sun, the Spirit of Nature, the terrestrial god. And in, on, and around the Earth, the fiery Spirit thereof — air, fluidic fire; water, liquid fire; Earth, solid fire. All is fire — ignis, in its ultimate constitution, . . . the three Vedic chief gods are Agni (ignis), Vayu , and Surya — Fire, Air, and the Sun, three occult degrees of fire. ( Secret Doctrine, II, p. 114) ( Bhagavad-Gita, W. Q. Judge, p. 85)
  • (TG) Agni Bahu {Sans} . An ascetic son of Manu Swayambhuva, the Self-born.
  • (TG) Agni Bhuvah {Sans} . Lit., born of fire, the term is applied to the four races of Kshatriyas (the second or warrior caste) whose ancestors are said to have sprung from fire. Agni Bhuvah is the son of Agni, the God of Fire; Agni Bhuvah being the same as Kartti-keya, the God of War. (See Secret Doctrine Vol. II., p. 550)
  • (TG) Agni Dhatu Samadhi {Sans} . A kind of contemplation in Yoga practice, when Kundalini is raised to the extreme and the infinitude appears as one sheet of fire. An ecstatic condition.
  • (TG) Agni Hotri {Sans} . The priests who served the Fire-God in Aryan antiquity. The term Agni Hotri is one that denotes oblation.
  • (WG) Agnihotri, a priest and invoker of fire. ( agni, fire, especially fire from heaven; hotri, priest, offerer, invoker
  • (TG) Agni-ratha {Sans} . A Fiery Vehicle literally. A kind of flying machine. Spoken of in ancient works of magic in India and in the epic poems.
  • (TG) Agnishwattas {Sans} . A class of Pitris, the creators of the first ethereal race of men. Our solar ancestors as contrasted with the Barhishads , the lunar Pitris or ancestors, though otherwise explained in the Puranas .
  • (WG) Agnisvattas, gods of fire and air; one of the two kinds of Pitris, incorporeal, without even astral forms, who are fashioners of the inner man.
  • (OG) Agnishvatta(s) — {Sans} A compound of two words: agni, fire; shvatta, tasted or sweetened, from svad, verb-root meaning to taste or to sweeten. Therefore, literally one who has been delighted or sweetened by fire. A class of pitris: our solar ancestors as contrasted with the barhishads, our lunar ancestors. The kumaras, agnishvattas, and manasaputras are three groups or aspects of the same beings: the kumaras represent the aspect of original spiritual purity untouched by gross elements of matter. The agnishvattas represent the aspect of their connection with the sun or solar spiritual fire. Having tasted or been sweetened by the spiritual fire — the fire of intellectuality and spirituality — they have been purified thereby. The manasaputras represent the aspect of intellectuality — the functions of higher intellect. The agnishvattas and manasaputras are two names for the same class or host of beings, and set forth or signify or represent two different aspects or activities of this one class of beings. Thus, for instance, a man may be said to be a kumara in his spiritual parts, an agnishvatta in his buddhic-manasic parts, and a manasaputra in his purely manasic aspect. Other beings could be called kumaras in their highest aspects, as for instance the beasts, but they are not imbodied agnishvattas or manasaputras.
  • The agnishvattas are the solar spiritual-intellectual parts of us, and therefore are our inner teachers. In preceding manvantaras, they had completed their evolution in the realms of physical matter, and when the evolution of lower beings had brought these latter to the proper state, the agnishvattas came to the rescue of these who had only the physical creative fire, thus inspiring and enlightening these lower lunar pitris with spiritual and intellectual energies or fires. When this earth’s planetary chain shall have reached the end of its seventh round, we, as then having completed the evolutionary course for this planetary chain, will leave this planetary chain as dhyan-chohans, agnishvattas; but the others now trailing along behind us — the present beasts — will be the lunar pitris of the next planetary chain to come. While it is correct to say that these three names appertain to the same class of beings, nevertheless each name has its own significance in the occult teaching, which is why the three names are used with three distinct meanings. Imagine an unconscious god-spark beginning its evolution in any one solar or maha-manvantara. We may call it a kumara, a being of original spiritual purity, but with a destiny through karmic evolution connected with the realms of matter. At the other end of the line, at the consummation of the evolution in this maha-manvantara, when the evolving entity has become a fully self-conscious god or divinity, its proper appellation then is agnishvatta, for it has been sweetened or purified by means of the working through it of the spiritual fires inherent in itself. Now then, when such an agnishvatta assumes the role of a bringer of mind or of intellectual light to a lunar pitri which it overshadows and in which a ray from it incarnates, it then, although in its own realm an agnishvatta, functions as a manasaputra or child of mind or mahat. A brief analysis of the compound elements of these three names may be useful. Kumara is from ku meaning with difficulty and mara meaning mortal. The significance of the word therefore can be paraphrased as mortal with difficulty, and the meaning usually given to it by Sanskrit scholars as easily dying is wholly exoteric and amusing, and doubtless arose from the fact that kumara is a word frequently used for child or boy, everybody knowing that young children die easily. The idea therefore is that purely spiritual beings, although ultimately destined by evolution to pass through the realms of matter, become mortal, i.e., material, only with difficulty. Agnishvatta has the meaning stated above, delighted or pleased or sweetened, i.e., purified by fire — which we may render in two ways: either as the fire of suffering and pain in material existence producing great fiber and strength of character, i.e., spirituality; or, perhaps still better from the standpoint of occultism, as signifying an entity or entities who have become one in essence through evolution with the aethery fire of spirit. Manasaputra is a compound of two words: manasa , mental or intellectual, from the word manas, mind, and putra , son or child, therefore a child of the cosmic mind — a mind-born son as H. P. Blavatsky phrases it.
  • (SP) Agnisvatta — literally tasted by fire, name of a class of pitr , father or progenitor.
  • (TG) Agnoia {Greek} . Divested of reason, lit., irrationality, when speaking of the animal Soul. According to Plutarch, Pythagoras and Plato divided the human soul into two parts (the higher and lower manas) — the rational or noetic and the irrational, or agnoia, sometimes written annoia.
  • (TG) Agnostic {Greek} . A word claimed by Mr. Huxley to have been coined by him to indicate one who believes nothing which cannot be demonstrated by the senses. The later schools of Agnosticism give more philosophical definitions of the term.
  • (KT) Agnostic. A word first used by Professor Huxley, to indicate one who believes nothing which cannot be demonstrated by the senses.
  • (VS) Agnyana (I 21) [[p. 7]] Agnyana is ignorance or non-wisdom the opposite of Knowledge gnyana .
  • (TG) Agra-Sandhani {Sans} . The Assessors or Recorders who read at the judgment of a disembodied Soul the record of its life in the heart of that SOUL. The same almost as the Lipikas of the Secret Doctrine
  • (TG) Agruerus A very ancient Phoenician god. The same as Saturn.
  • (TG) Aham {Sans} . I, — the basis of Ahankara, Self-hood.
  • (SK) Aham Brahmasmi. I am Brahman. ( Aham — I, Brahma — the Universe’s divinity, asmi — am)
  • Aham asmi Parabrahma I am verily the Boundless Divine
  • (SK) Aham eva Parabrahma. I am verily the Boundless.
  • (TG) Ahan {Sans} . Day, the Body of Brahma, in the Puranas .
  • (TG) Ahankara {Sans} . The conception of I, Self-consciousness or Self-identity; the I, the egotistical and mayavic principle in man, due to our ignorance which separates our I from the Universal ONE-SELF Personality, Egoism.
  • (KT) Ahankara {Sans} The conception of I, self-consciousness or self-identity; the I, or egoistical and mayavic principle in man, due to our ignorance which separates our I from the Universal ONE- Self . Personality, egoism also.
  • (VS) Ahankara (III 14) [[p. 56]] Ahankarathe I or feeling of one’s personality, the I-am-ness.
  • (FY) Ahankara, personality; egoism; self identity; the fifth principle.
  • (WG) Ahamkara, egoism; that which within us says, I am the actor, for me all this is being done; in Sankhya philosophy, the third of the eight producers of creation. ( Aham, I; kara, making: the making of self
  • (OG) Ahankara — {Sans} A compound word: aham, I; kara , maker or doer, from the verb-root kri , to do, to make; egoism, personality. The egoistical and mayavi principle in man, born of the ignorance or avidya which produces the notion of the I as being different from the universal One-Self.
  • (GH) Ahankara (or Ahamkara) Egoism, the sense of personality or ‘I-am-I-ness’: in its lower aspect in man it is the egoistical principle which produces the notion of the personal ego as being different from the Universal One-Self. Kosmically speaking, Ahankara is that which first issues from ‘Mahat’ or divine mind; the first shadowy outline of Self-hood, for ‘pure’ Ahankara becomes ‘passionate’ and finally ‘rudimental’ (initial); . . . ( Secret Doctrine, I, pp. 452-3). (Compound aham, I; kara, doer, maker; from (The following word is derived from the verbal root:) kri to do. Bhagavad-Gita, W. Q. Judge, p. 53)
  • (SKv) Ahankara Egotism, the conception of ‘I am I’; a compound of aham — I, and kara derived from the verb-root kri — to do, to make; hence that conception of self and of personality which tends to lead to selfishness. Before one can attain Buddhahood he must realize the unreality of this idea of a personal Ego, of Ahankara.
  • (SP) Ahankara [ahamkara, ahankara] — egoism, literally I-maker.
  • (PV) Ahau Lord. The reigning Regent of a Maya calendric cycle; the final day of the month. The Fourth Regent is equated with Hunahpu.
  • (TG) Aheie {Hebr} . Existence. He who exists; corresponds to Kether and Macroprosopus.
  • (TG) Ah-hi {Sensar}, Ahi {Sans}, or Serpents. Dhyan Chohans. Wise Serpents or Dragons of Wisdom.
  • (IN) Ah-hi (Senzar) Dhyani-chohans, primordial seven logoi, the elohim, a class of celestial beings through which universal mind manifests.
  • (TG) Ahi {Sans} . A serpent. A name of Vritra, the Vedic demon of drought.
  • (FY) Ahriman, the Evil Principle of the Universe; so called by the Zoroastrians.
  • (WG) Ahriman, the evil principle of the universe; the Satan of Zoroastrianism; an asura.
  • (TG) Ahti #94 . The Dragon in the Eddas .
  • (TG) Ahu #94 . One and the First.
  • (TG) Ahum {avesta} . The first three principles of septenary man in the Avesta ; the gross living man and his vital and astral principles.
  • (FY) Ahum, the first three principles of septenary human constitution; the gross living body of man according to the Avesta.
  • (TG) Ahura {avesta} . The same as Asura, the holy, the Breath-like. Ahura Mazda, the Ormuzd of the Zoroastrians or Parsis, is the Lord who bestows light and intelligence, whose symbol is the Sun (See Ahura Mazda), and of whom Ahriman, a European form of Angra Mainyu (q.v . ), is the dark aspect.
  • (TG) Ahura Mazda {avesta} . The personified deity, the Principle of Universal Divine Light of the Parsis. From Ahura or Asura, breath, spiritual, divine in the oldest Rig Veda , degraded by the orthodox Brahmans into A-sura , no gods, just as the Mazdeans have degraded the Hindu Devas (Gods) into Daeva (Devils).
  • (WG) Ahura-Mazda, the divine principle with the Parsees.
  • (TG) Aidoneus {Greek} . The God and King of the Nether World; Pluto or Dionysos Chthonios (subterranean).
  • (TG) Aij Taion. The supreme deity of the Yakoot, a tribe in Northern Siberia.
  • (TG) Ain {Hebr} . The negatively existent; deity in repose, and absolutely passive.
  • (TG) Ain-Aior {Chald} . The only Self-existent, a mystic name for divine substance. [W. W. W]
  • (TG) Aindri {Sans} . Wife of Indra.
  • (TG) Aindriya {Sans} . Or Indrani , Indriya; Sakti . The female aspect or wife of Indra.
  • (TG) Ain Soph {Hebr} . The Boundless or Limitless; Deity emanating and extending. [W. W. W]
  • Ain Soph is also written En Soph and Ain Suph, no one, not even Rabbis, being sure of their vowels. In the religious metaphysics of the old Hebrew philosophers, the ONE Principle was an abstraction, like Parabrahmam, though modern Kabbalists have succeeded now, by dint of mere sophistry and paradoxes, in making a Supreme God of it and nothing higher. But with the early Chaldean Kabbalists Ain Soph is without form or being, having no likeness with anything else (Franck, Die Kabbala, p. 126). That Ain Soph has never been considered as the Creator is proved by even such an orthodox Jew as Philo calling the Creator the Logos, who stands next the Limitless One, and the Second God. The Second God is its (Ain Soph’s) wisdom, says Philo (Quaest. et Solut . ) . Deity is NO-THING; it is nameless, and therefore called Ain Soph; the word Ain meaning NOTHING.
  • (KT) Ain-Soph {Hebr} The Boundless or Limitless Deity emanating and extending. Ain-Soph is also written En-Soph and Ain-Suph, for no one, not even the Rabbis, are quite sure of their vowels. In the religious metaphysics of the old Hebrew philosophers, the ONE Principle was an abstraction like Parabrahm, though modern Kabalists have succeeded by mere dint of sophistry and paradoxes in making a Supreme God of it, and nothing higher. But with the early Chaldean Kabalists Ain-Soph was without form or being with no likeness with anything else. 126 That Ain-Soph has never been considered as the Creator is proved conclusively by the fact that such an orthodox Jew as Philo calls creator the Logos, who stands next the Limitless One, and is the SECOND God. The Second God is in its (Ain-Soph’s) wisdom, says Philo in Quaest et Solut. Deity is NO-THING; it is nameless, and therefore called Ain-Soph — the word Ain meaning nothing.
  • (WG) Ain-Soph {Hebr} boundless, the expanding Deity. It is also written En-Soph.{Hebr}
  • (TG) Ain Soph Aur {Hebr} . The Boundless Light which concentrates into the First and highest Sephira or Kether, the Crown. WA
  • (GH) Airavata The elephant produced by the gods at the time of the churning of the ocean. He became the special charge of Indra and one of the eight Lokapalas. These latter are the cosmical spirits who preside over the eight points of the compass (Airavata guards the east and are closely akin to the four Maharajas — the four ‘GreatWatchers.’ Although the Lokapalas are represented as ‘elephants,’ H. P. Blavatsky remarks that all of them have an occult significance. ( Secret Doctrine, I, p. 128) (Meaning of the word itself: produced from the ocean, from iravat, the ocean. Bhagavad-Gita, W. Q. Judge, p. 74)
  • (TG) Airyamen Yaego {avesta} . Or Airyana Vaego; the primeval land of bliss referred to in the Vendidad, where Ahura Mazda delivered his laws to Zoroaster (Spitama Zarathustra).
  • (TG) Airyana-ishejo {avesta} . The name of a prayer to the holy Airyamen, the divine aspect of Ahriman before the latter became a dark opposing power, a Satan. For Ahriman is of the same essence with Ahura Mazda, just as Typhon-Seth is of the same essence with Osiris (q.v . ) .
  • (TG) Aish {Hebr} . The word for Man.
  • (TG) Aisvarikas {Sans} . A theistic school of Nepaul, which sets up Adi Buddha as a supreme god (Isvara), instead of seeing in the name that of a principle, an abstract philosophical symbol.
  • (WG) Aisvarya, power; superhuman powers of omnipresence, omnipotence, invisibility, etc.
  • (TG) Aitareya {Sans} . The name of an Aranyaka (Brahmana) and a Upanishad of the Rig Veda . Some of its portions are purely Vedantic.
  • (WG) Aitareya-Brahmana, name of a Upanishad.
  • (TG) Aith-ur {Chald} . Solar fire, divine Aether.
  • (WG) Aitihya, oral communication, traditional instruction.
  • (TG) Aja {Sans} . Unborn, uncreated; an epithet belonging to many of the primordial gods, but especially to the first Logos — a radiation of the Absolute on the plane of illusion.
  • (WG) Aja, not born, existing from all eternity; a term applied to the higher deities.
  • (PV) Ajbit {quiche-maya} Singular of Bitol, a class of builder gods; in Quiche-Maya theogony, Ajbit is associated with Ajtzak.
  • (TG) Ajitas {Sans} . One of the Occult names of the twelve great gods incarnating in each Manvantara. The Occultists identify them with the Kumaras. They are called Jnana (or Gnana) Devas. Also, a form of Vishnu in the second Manvantara. Called also Jayas.
  • (TG) Ajnana {Sans} or Agyana (Bengali) . Non-knowledge; absence of knowledge rather than ignorance as generally translated. An Ajnani, means a profane.
  • (WG) Ajnana, ignorance, or not-knowledge.
  • (WG) Ajnyana, ignorance.
  • (PV) Ajtzak {quiche-maya} Singular of Tzakol, a class of builder gods in Quiche-Maya theogony; associated with Ajbit.
  • (TG) Akar {Egyp} . The proper name of that division of the Ker-neter infernal regions, which may be called Hell. .
  • (TG) Akasa {Sans} . The subtle, supersensuous spiritual essence which pervades all space; the primordial substance erroneously identified with Ether. But it is to Ether what Spirit is to Matter, or Atma to Kama-rupa . It is, in fact, the Universal Space in which lies inherent the eternal Ideation of the Universe in its ever-changing aspects on the planes of matter and objectivity, and from which radiates the First Logos, or expressed thought. This is why it is stated in the Puranas that Akasa has but one attribute, namely sound, for sound is but the translated symbol of Logos — Speech in its mystic sense. In the same sacrifice (the Jyotishtoma Agnishtoma ) it is called the God Akasa. In these sacrificial mysteries Akasa is the all-directing and omnipotent Deva who plays the part of Sadasya, the superintendent over the magical effects of the religious performance, and it had its own appointed Hotri (priest) in days of old, who took its name. The Akasa is the indispensable agent of every Kritya (magical performance) religious or profane. The expression to stir up the Brahma, means to stir up the power which lies latent at the bottom of every magical operation, Vedic sacrifices being in fact nothing if not ceremonial magic. This power is the Akasa — in another aspect, Kundalini — occult electricity, the alkahest of the alchemists in one sense, or the universal solvent, the same anima mundi on the higher plane as the astral light is on the lower. At the moment of the sacrifice the priest becomes imbued with the spirit of Brahma, is, for the time being, Brahman himself. (Isis Unveiled) .
  • (IU) Akasa. — Literally the word means in Sanscrit sky, but in its mystic sense it signifies the invisible sky; or, as the Brahmans term it in the Soma-sacrifice (the Gyotishtoma, Agnishtoma ), the god Akasa, or god Sky. The language of the Vedas shows that the Hindus of fifty centuries ago ascribed to it the same properties as do the Thibetan lamas of the present day; that they regarded it as the source of life, the reservoir of all energy, and the propeller of every change of matter. In its latent state it tallies exactly with our idea of the universal ether; in its active state it became the Akasa, the all-directing and omnipotent god. In the Brahmanical sacrificial mysteries it plays the part of Sadasya, or superintendent over the magical effects of the religious performance, and it had its own appointed Hotar (or priest), who took its name. In India, as in other countries in ancient times, the priests are the representatives on earth of different gods; each taking the name of the deity in whose name he acts. The Akasa is the indispensable agent of every Kritya (magical performance) either religious or profane. The Brahmanical expression to stir up the Brahma — Brahma jinvati — means to stir up the power which lies latent at the bottom of every such magical operation, for the Vedic sacrifices are but ceremonial magic. This power is the Akasa or the occult electricity; the alkahest of the alchemists in one sense, or the universal solvent, the same anima mundi as the astral light. At the moment of the sacrifice, the latter becomes imbued with the spirit of Brahma, and so for the time being is Brahma himself. This is the evident origin of the Christian dogma of transubstantiation. As to the most general effects of the Akasa, the author of one of the most modern works on the occult philosophy, Art-Magic, gives for the first time to the world a most intelligible and interesting explanation of the Akasa in connection with the phenomena attributed to its influence by the fakirs and lamas.
  • (FY) Akasa, the subtle supersensuous matter which pervades all space.
  • (WG) Akasa, the subtle fluid that pervades all space, and exists everywhere and in everything, as the vehicle of life and sound; out-look, open space, sky, aether. It is said that by a knowledge and use of the akasa all magical feats can be performed.
  • (OG) Akasa — {Sans} The word means brilliant, shining, luminous. The fifth kosmic element, the fifth essence or quintessence, called Aether by the ancient Stoics; but it is not the ether of science. The ether of science is merely one of its lower elements. In the Brahmanical scriptures akasa is used for what the northern Buddhists call svabhavat, more mystically Adi-buddhi — primeval buddhi:; it is also mulaprakriti, the kosmical spirit-substance, the reservoir of Being and of beings. The Hebrew Old Testament refers to it as the kosmic waters. It is universal substantial space ; also mystically Alaya. ( See also Mulaprakriti, Alaya)
  • (GH) Akasa The Fifth Kosmic Element: the spiritual Essence which pervades all space; in fact it may be called imbodied universal Space — in this aspect known as Aditi. It is the substratum for the seven Prakritis (roots) of all in the universe; thus in one sense is Mulaprakriti (the Kosmical Root-Substance). The word itself, without its philosophical meaning, signifies the sky, the open space, hence it is often rendered ‘ether’ in translations from the Sanskrit works, but as H. P. Blavatsky pointed out, Akasa is not that Ether of Science, not even the Ether of the Occultist, who defines the latter as one of the principles of Akasa only ( Secret Doctrine, I, p. 296). In the Brahmanical scriptures the term is used in the same manner that Northern Buddhists employ Svabhavat — more mystically Adi-Buddhi. Some have associated the Astral Light with Akasa, but the former is but a reflection of the latter: To put it plainly, ETHER is the Astral Light, and the Primordial Substance is AKASA, the Upadhi of DIVINE THOUGHT. ( Secret Doctrine, I, p. 326) ((The following word is derived from the verbal root:) kas, to shine, to appear. Bhagavad-Gita, W. Q. Judge, p. 53)
  • (SK)o Akasa, Akasic Akasa is the fifth Kosmic Element; the Element above or rather within the other elements of earth, water, air, and fire; derived from the verb-root kas — to shine; hence ‘the shining substance.’ Akasa is primordial spacial substance of a subtil supersensuous and spiritual nature and it pervades all things. It is the vehicle of Divine Thought and hence it is said to have but one attribute, that of sound. The Akasa is the medium of the higher thoughts of men, the medium by which they can communicate with the Gods. Akasa, sometimes called ‘occult electricity,’ is used in the carrying out of any magical or spiritual performance. Akasa has been called by the Mahatmans the ‘tablet of memory’ of the Hierarchy of Dhyan-Chohans as well as of every spiritual Ego, while the Astral Light is the ‘tablet of memory’ of the earth and of animal man. When a man loves all things, as did the Buddha, he surrounds himself with Akasic substance which becomes a protective shield which no malevolent influences can penetrate.
  • (IN) Akasha, Akasa {Sans} fr kas , to shine) space, vacuity, aether, the fifth cosmic element; subtle spiritual essence or substance which pervades all space.
  • (SP) Akasa — the fifth cosmic element, aether; also space.
  • (TG) Akbar. The great Mogul Emperor of India, the famous patron of religions, arts, and sciences, the most liberal of all the Mussulman sovereigns. There has never been a more tolerant or enlightened ruler than the Emperor Akbar, either in India or in any other Mohametan country.
  • (WG) Akhyayikas, short tales or anecdotes.
  • (TG) Akiba {Hebr} . The only one of the four Tanaim (initiated prophets) who entering the Garden of Delight (of the occult sciences) succeeded in getting himself initiated while all the others failed.
  • (WG) Aksha, eye; any round thing.
  • (TG) Akshara {Sans} . Supreme Deity; lit., indestructible, ever perfect.
  • (VS) Akshara, the indestructible Fount of Omniscience (I 19) [[p. 6]] The region of the full Spiritual Consciousness beyond which there is no longer danger for him who has reached it.
  • (WG) Akshara, unbroken, imperishable; Brahma, Vishnu, or Siva: the syllable Om; the soul. ( aksha , a round thing, a circle, unbroken [like a circle
  • (SKv) Akshara The ‘Imperishable’; a compound of a — not, and kshara , derived from the verbal root kshar — to flow, to perish. Akshara is another descriptive name given to Brahman, the Universal Self. It is sometimes also applied to other high gods of the Hindu pantheon in order to suggest their enduring nature for long cycles of time.
  • (TG) Akta {Sans} . Anointed: a title of Twashtri or Visvakarman, the highest Creator and Logos in the Rig-Veda . He is called the Father of the Gods and Father of the sacred Fire (See
  • (WG) Akta, anointed, initiated. ò
  • (TG) Akupara {Sans} . The Tortoise, the symbolical turtle on which the earth is said to rest.
  • (TG) Al-ait {Phoen} . The God of fire, an ancient and very mystic name in Koptic Occultism.
  • (TG) Alaparus {Chald} . The second divine king of Babylonia who reigned three Sari. The first king of the divine Dynasty was Alorus according to Berosus. He was the appointed Shepherd of the people and reigned ten Sari (or 36,000 years, a Saros being 3,600 years).
  • (TG) Alaya {Sans} . The Universal Soul The name belongs to the Tibetan system of the contemplative Mahayana School. Identical with Akasa in its mystic sense, and with Mulaprakriti , in its essence, as it is the basis or root of all things.
  • (WG) Alaya, the over-soul not; laya, dissolution: non-dissolution, permanence
  • (WG) Alaya, in addition to meaning already given it, may be rendered Universal Soul.
  • (OG) Alaya — {Sans} A compound word: a, not; laya , from the verb-root li, to dissolve; hence the indissoluble. The universal soul; the basis or root or fountain of all beings and things — the universe, gods, monads, atoms, etc. Mystically identical with akasa in the latter’s highest elements, and with mulaprakriti in the latter’s essence as root-producer or root-nature. ( See also Akasa, Buddhi, Mulaprakriti) [NOTE: The Secret Doctrine (1:49) mentions Alaya in the Yogachara system, most probably referring to alaya-vijnana , but adds that with the Esoteric ‘Buddhists’ . . . ‘Alaya’ has a double and even a triple meaning. — PUBLISHER]
  • (SKv) Alaya The ‘Indissoluble’ or the ‘Everlasting’; a compound of a — not, and laya derived from the verb-root li — to dissolve. According to the Buddhists, Alaya is the fountain of all beings and things, hence corresponds to the higher forms of Akasa, the fifth Cosmic Element, and with Mulaprakriti, or substantial Space, when it is considered as the Originator of manifested things. Alaya is also used to describe the Spiritual Self in man, which endures throughout the great period of the Planet’s Life.
  • (IN) Alaya {Sans} The indissoluble; in Buddhism the universal soul or mahabuddhi.
  • (TG) Alba Petra {Latin} . The white stone of Initiation. The white cornelian mentioned in St. John’s Revelation .
  • (TG) Al-Chazari {arabic} Prince-Philosopher and Occultist
  • (TG) Alchemists. From Al and Chemi, fire, or the god and patriarch, Kham , also, the name of Egypt. The Rosicrucians of the middle ages, such as Robertus de Fluctibus (Robert Fludd), Paracelsus, Thomas Vaughan (Eugenius Philalethes), Van Helmont, and others, were all alchemists, who sought for the hidden spirit in every inorganic matter. Some people — nay, the great majority — have accused alchemists of charlatanry and false pretending. Surely such men as Roger Bacon, Agrippa, Henry Khunrath, and the Arabian Geber (the first to introduce into Europe some of the secrets of chemistry), can hardly he treated as impostors — least of all as fools. Scientists who are reforming the science of physics upon the basis of the atomic theory of Democritus, as restated by John Dalton, conveniently forget that Democritus, of Abdera, was an alchemist, and that the mind that was capable of penetrating so far into the secret operations of nature in one direction must have had good reasons to study and become a Hermetic philosopher. Olaus Borrichius says that the cradle of alchemy is to be sought in the most distant times. (Isis Unveiled) .
  • (IU) Alchemists. — From Al and Chemi, fire, or the god and patriarch, Kham , also, the name of Egypt. The Rosicrucians of the middle ages, such as Robertus de Fluctibus (Robert Fludd), Paracelsus, Thomas Vaughan (Eugenius Philalethes), Van Helmont, and others, were all alchemists, who sought for the hidden spirit in every inorganic matter. Some people — nay, the great majority — have accused alchemists of charlatanry and false pretending. Surely such men as Roger Bacon, Agrippa, Henry Kunrath, and the Arabian Geber (the first to introduce into Europe some of the secrets of chemistry), can hardly be treated as impostors — least of all as fools. Scientists who are reforming the science of physics upon the basis of the atomic theory of Demokritus, as restated by John Dalton, conveniently forget that Demokritus of Abdera, was an alchemist, and that the mind that was capable of penetrating so far into the secret operations of nature in one direction must have had good reasons to study and become a Hermetic philosopher. Olaus Borrichius says, that the cradle of alchemy is to be sought in the most distant times.
  • (TG) Alchemy, in Arabic Ul-Khemi , is, as the name suggests, the chemistry of nature. Ul-Khemi or Al-Kimia, however, is only an Arabianized word, taken from the Greek chemeia from chumos — juice, sap extracted from a plant. Says Dr. Wynn Westcott: The earliest use of the actual term ‘alchemy’ is found in the works of Julius Firmicus Maternus, who lived in the days of Constantine the Great. The Imperial Library in Paris contains the oldest extant alchemic treatise known in Europe; it was written by Zosimus the Panopolite about 400 A.D. in the Greek language, the next oldest is by Aeneas Gazeus, 480 A.D. It deals with the finer forces of nature and the various conditions in which they are found to operate. Seeking under the veil of language, more or less artificial, to convey to the uninitiated so much of the mysterium magnum as is safe in the hands of a selfish world, the alchemist postulates as his first principle the existence of a certain Universal Solvent by which all composite bodies are resolved into the homogeneous substance from which they are evolved, which substance he calls pure gold, or summa materia . This solvent, also called menstrum universale , possesses the power of removing all the seeds of disease from the human body, of renewing youth and prolonging life. Such is the lapis philosophorum (philosopher’s stone). Alchemy first penetrated into Europe through Geber, the great Arabian sage and philosopher, in the eighth century of our era; but it was known and practised long ages ago in China and in Egypt, numerous papyri on alchemy and other proofs of its being the favourite study of kings and priests having been exhumed and preserved under the generic name of Hermetic treatises. (See Tabula Smaragdina). Alchemy is studied under three distinct aspects, which admit of many different interpretations, viz .: the Cosmic, Human, and Terrestrial. These three methods were typified under the three alchemical properties — sulphur, mercury, and salt. Different writers have stated that there are three, seven, ten, and twelve processes respectively; but they are all agreed that there is but one object in alchemy, which is to transmute gross metals into pure gold. What that gold, however, really is, very few people understand correctly. No doubt that there is such a thing in nature as transmutation of the baser metals into the nobler, or gold. But this is only one aspect of alchemy, the terrestrial or purely material, for we sense logically the same process taking place in the bowels of the earth. Yet, besides and beyond this interpretation, there is in alchemy a symbolical meaning, purely psychic and spiritual. While the Kabbalist-Alchemist seeks for the realization of the former, the Occultist-Alchemist, spurning the gold of the mines, gives all his attention and directs his efforts only towards the transmutation of the baser quaternary into the divine upper trinity of man, which when finally blended are one. The spiritual, mental, psychic, and physical planes of human existence are in alchemy compared to the four elements, fire, air, water and earth, and are each capable of a threefold constitution, i.e ., fixed, mutable and volatile. Little or nothing is known by the word concerning the origin of this archaic branch of philosophy; but it is certain that it antedates the construction of any known Zodiac, and, as dealing with the personified forces of nature, probably also any of the mythologies of the world; nor is there any doubt that the true secret of transmutation (on the physical plane) was known in days of old, and lost before the dawn of the so-called historical period. Modern chemistry owes its best fundamental discoveries to alchemy, but regardless of the undeniable truism of the latter that there is but one element in the universe, chemistry has placed metals in the class of elements and is only now beginning to find out its gross mistake. Even some Encyclopaedists are now forced to confess that if most of the accounts of transmutations are fraud or delusion, yet some of them are accompanied by testimony which renders them probable . . . By means of the galvanic battery even the alkalis have been discovered to have a metallic base. The possibility of obtaining metal from other substances which contain the ingredients composing it, and of changing one metal into another . . . must therefore be left undecided. Nor are all alchemists to be considered impostors. Many have laboured under the conviction of obtaining their object, with indefatigable patience and purity of heart, which is earnestly recommended by sound alchemists as the principal requisite for the success of their labours. (Pop. Encyclop . )
  • (KT) Alchemy, in Arabic Ul-Khemi, is as the name suggests, the chemistry of nature. Ul-Khemi or Al-Kimia, however, is really an Arabianized word, taken from the Greek chemeia from chumos juice, extracted from a plant. Alchemy deals with the finer forces of nature and the various conditions of matter in which they are found to operate. Seeking under the veil of language, more or less artificial, to convey to the uninitiated so much of the Mysterium Magnum as is safe in the hands of a selfish world, the Alchemist postulates as his first principle, the existence of a certain Universal Solvent in the homogeneous substance from which the elements were evolved; which substance he calls pure gold, or summum materiae. This solvent, also called menstruum universale, possesses the power of removing all the seeds of disease out of the human body, of renewing youth, and prolonging life. Such is the lapis philosophorum (philosopher’s stone). Alchemy first penetrated into Europe through Geber, the great Arabian sage and philosopher, in the eighth century of our era; but it was known and practised long ages ago in China and Egypt. Numerous papyri on Alchemy, and other proofs that it was the favourite study of Kings and Priests, have been exhumed and preserved under the generic name of Hermetic treatises (see Tabula Smaragdina). Alchemy is studied under three distinct aspects, which admit of many different interpretations, viz.: the Cosmic, the Human, and the Terrestrial. These three methods were typified under the three alchemical properties — sulphur, mercury, and salt. Different writers have stated that these are three, seven, ten and twelve processes respectively; but they are all agreed there is but one object in Alchemy, which is to transmute gross metals into pure gold. But what that gold really is, very few people understand correctly. No doubt there is such a thing in Nature as transmutation of the baser metal into the nobler; but this is only one aspect of Alchemy, the terrestrial, or purely material, for we see logically the same process taking place in the bowels of the earth. Yet, besides and beyond this interpretation, there is in Alchemy a symbolical meaning, purely psychic and spiritual. While the Kabalist-Alchemist seeks for the realization of the former, the Occultist-Alchemist, spurning the gold of the earth, gives all his attention to and directs his efforts only towards the transmutation of the baser quaternary into the divine upper trinity of man, which when finally blended, is one. The spiritual, mental, psychic, and physical planes of human existence are in Alchemy compared to the four elements — fire, air, water, and earth, and are each capable of a three-fold constitution, i. e., fixed, unstable, and volatile. Little or nothing is known by the world concerning the origin of this archaic branch of philosophy; but it is certain that it antedates the construction of any known Zodiac, and as dealing with the personified forces of nature, probably also any of the mythologies of the world. Nor is there any doubt that the true secrets of transmutation (on the physical plane) were known in the days of old, and lost before the dawn of the so-called historical period. Modern chemistry owes its best fundamental discoveries to Alchemy, but regardless of the undeniable truism of the latter, that there is but one element in the universe, chemistry placed metals in the class of elements, and is only now beginning to find out its gross mistake. Even some encyclopedists are forced to confess that if most of the accounts of transmutation are fraud or delusion, yet some of them are accompanied by testimony which renders them probable. By means of the galvanic battery even the alkalis have been discovered to have a metallic basis. The possibility of obtaining metal from other substances which contain the ingredients composing it, of changing one metal into another . . . must therefore be left undecided. Nor are all Alchemists to be considered impostors. Many have laboured under the conviction of obtaining their object, with indefatigable patience and purity of heart, which is soundly recommended by Alchemists as the principal requisite for the success of their labours
  • (TG) Alcyone {Greek}, or Halcyon, daughter of AEolus, and wife of Ceyx, who was drowned as he was journeying to consult the oracle, upon which she threw herself into the sea. Accordingly both were changed, through the mercy of the gods, into king-fishers. The female is said to lay her eggs on the sea and keep it calm during the seven days before and seven days after the winter solstice. It has a very occult significance in ornithomancy.
  • (TG) Alectromancy {Greek} . Divination by means of a cock, or other bird; a circle was drawn and divided into spaces, each one allotted to a letter; corn was spread over these places and note was taken of the successive lettered divisions from which the bird took grains of corn. [W.W.W.]
  • (TG) Alethae {Phoen} . Fire worshippers from Al-ait, the God of Fire. The same as the Kabiri or divine Titans. As the seven emanations of Agruerus (Saturn) they are connected with all the fire, solar and storm gods (Maruts) .
  • (TG) Aletheia {Greek} . Truth; also Alethia, one of Apollo’s nurses.
  • (TG) Alexandrian School (of Philosophers). This famous school arose in Alexandria (Egypt) which was for several centuries the great seat of learning and philosophy. Famous for its library, which bears the name of Alexandrian, founded by Ptolemy Soter, who died in 283 B.C., at the very beginning of his reign; that library which once boasted of 700,000 rolls or volumes (Aulus Gellius); for its museum, the first real academy of sciences and arts; for its world-famous scholars, such as Euclid (the father of scientific geometry), Apollonius of Perga (the author of the still extant work on conic sections), Nicomachus (the arithmetician); astronomers, natural philosophers, anatomists such as Herophilus and Erasistratus, physicians, musicians, artists, etc., etc.; it became still more famous for its Eclectic, or the New Platonic school, founded in 193 A.D., by Ammonius Saccas, whose disciples were Origen, Plotinus, and many others now famous in History. The most celebrated schools of Gnostics had their origin in Alexandria. Philo Judaeus, Josephus, Iamblichus, Porphyry, Clement of Alexandria, Eratosthenes the astronomer, Hypatia the virgin philosopher, and numberless other stars of second magnitude, all belonged at various times to these great schools, and helped to make Alexandria one of the most justly renowned seats of learning that the world has ever produced.
  • (KT) Alexandrian Philosophers (or School). This famous school arose in Alexandria, Egypt, which city was for long ages the seat of learning and philosophy. It was famous for its library, founded by Ptolemy Soter at the very beginning of his reign (Ptolemy died library which once boasted 700,000 rolls, or volumes (Aulus Gellius), for its museum, the first real Academy of Sciences and Arts, for world-renowned scholars, such as Euclid, the father of scientific geometry; Apollonius of Perga, the author of the still extant work on conic sections; Nicomachus, the arithmetician: for astronomers, natural philosophers, anatomists such as Herophilus and Erasistratus; physicians, musicians, artists, etc. But it became still more famous for its eclectic, or new Platonic school, founded by Ammonius Saccas in 173 A. D., whose disciples were Origen, Plotinus, and many other men now famous in history. The most celebrated schools of the Gnostics had their origin in Alexandria. Philo-Judaeus, Josephus, Iamblichus, Porphyry, Clement of Alexandria, Eratosthenes the astronomer, Hypatia, the virgin philosopher, and numberless other stars of second magnitude, all belonged at various times to these great schools, and helped to make of Alexandria one of the most justly renowned seats of learning that the world has ever produced.
  • (MO) Alf {Nors} (alv) [channel] Elf, soul
  • (TG) Alhim {Hebr} . See Elohim.
  • (TG) Alkahest {arabic} . The universal solvent in Alchemy (see Alchemy); but in mysticism, the Higher Self, the union with which makes of matter (lead), gold, and restores all compound things such as the human body and its attributes to their primaeval essence.
  • (WG) Alkoran, same as Koran , which see.
  • (MO) Allvis {Nors} (al-veece) [ all all + vis wise] A dwarf: worldly wise wooer of Thor’s daughter
  • (TG) Almadel, the Book. A treatise on Theurgia or White Magic by an unknown mediaeval European author; it is not infrequently found in volumes of MSS. called Keys of Solomon .
  • (TG) Almeh {arabic} . Dancing girls; the same as the Indian nautches, the temple and public dancers.
  • (PV) Alom {quiche-maya} One of six hypostases of Cabahuil or god-Seven. Especially associated with the three other hypostases: Tzakol, Bitol, and Cajolom; these four are regent gods of the 4 cosmic angles. Their mediation produces light.
  • (TG) Alpha and Omega , A. and ., the First and the Last, the beginning and ending of all active existence; the Logos, hence (with the Christians) Christ. See Rev .21 6., where John adopts Alpha and Omega as the symbol of a Divine Comforter who will give unto him that is athirst of the fountain of the water of life freely. The word Azot or Azoth is a mediaeval glyph of this idea, for the word consists of the first and last letters of the Greek alphabet, A and, of the Latin alphabet, A and Z, and of the Hebrew alphabet, A and T, or aleph and tau . (See also Azoth
  • (TG) Alpha Polaris {Latin} . The same as Dhruva, the pole-star of 31,105 years ago.
  • (TG) Alswider #94 . All-swift, the name of the horse of the moon, in the Eddas .
  • (TG) Altruism {Latin} . From alter = other. A quality opposed to egoism. Actions tending to do good to others, regardless of self.
  • (KT) Altruism, from Alter, other. A quality opposed to Egoism. Actions tending to do good to others, regardless of self.
  • (TG) Alze, Liber, de Lapide Philosophico. An alchemic treatise by an unknown German author; dated 1677 It is to be found reprinted in the Hermetic Museum; in it is the well known design of a man with legs extended and his body hidden by a seven pointed star. Eliphas Levi has copied it.
  • (TG) Ama {Hebr} ., Amia , {Chald} . Mother. A title of Sephira Binah, whose divine name is Jehovah and who is called Supernal Mother.
  • (TG) Amanasa {Sans} . The Mindless, the early races of this planet; also certain Hindu gods.
  • (WG) Amanasa, the mindless. ( a , not; manas, mind
  • (IN) Amanasa {Sans} The mindless, protohuman races.
  • (TG) Amara-Kosha {Sans} . The immortal vocabulary. The oldest dictionary known in the world and the most perfect vocabulary of classical Sanskrit; by Amara Sinha, a sage of the second century.
  • (TG) Amba {Sans} . The name of the eldest of the seven Pleiades, the heavenly sisters married each to a Rishi belonging to the Saptariksha or the seven Rishis of the constellation known as the Great Bear.
  • (GH) Amba The eldest daughter of the king of Kasi. Through the fault of Bhishma she was rejected by her suitor, whereupon she withdrew to the forest and after practising severe penances she ended her life on the funeral pyre, and was then reborn as Sikhandin . The word in the text should read Ambika — the second daughter of the king.
  • (GH) Ambalika The third daughter of the king of Kasi given by Bhishma in marriage to his half brother Vichitravirya. After the latter’s death she was wedded to Vyasa, and became the mother of Pandu . ( Bhagavad-Gita , W. Q. Judge, p. Iii)
  • (TG) Ambhamsi {Sans} . A name of the chief of the Kumaras, Sanat-Sujata, signifying the waters. This epithet will become more comprehensible when we remember that the later type of Sanat-Sujata was Michael, the Archangel, who is called in the Talmud the Prince of Waters , and in the Roman Catholic Church is regarded as the patron of gulfs and promontories. Sanat-Sujata is the immaculate son of the immaculate mother (Amba or Aditi, chaos and space) or the waters of limitless space
  • (GH) Ambika The second daughter of the king of Kasi wedded to Vichitravirya. After his death she was married to Vyasa, and gave birth to Dhritarashtra . ( Bhagavad-Gita, W. Q. Judge, p. iii)
  • (TG) Amdo {Tibe} . A sacred locality, the birthplace of Tson-kha-pa, the great Tibetan reformer and the founder of the Gelukpa (yellow caps), who is regarded as an Avatar of Amita-buddha.
  • (TG) Amen. In Hebrew is formed of the letters A M N = 1, 40, 50 = 91, and is thus a simile of Jehovah Adonai = 10, 5, 6, 5 and 1, 4, 50, 10 = 91 together; it is one form of the Hebrew word for truth. In common parlance Amen is said to mean so be it. But, in esoteric parlance Amen means The concealed. Manetho Sebennites says the word signifies that which is hidden and we know through Hecataeus and others that the Egyptians used the word to call upon their great God of Mystery, Ammon (or Ammas, the hidden god) to make himself conspicuous and manifest to them. Bonomi, the famous hieroglyphist, calls his worshippers very pertinently the Amenoph, and Mr. Bonwick quotes a writer who says: Ammon, the hidden god, will remain for ever hidden till anthropomorphically revealed; gods who are afar off are useless. Amen is styled Lord of the new-moon festival. Jehovah-Adonai is a new form of the ram-headed god Amoun or Ammon who was invoked by the Egyptian priests under the name of Amen.
  • (TG) Amenti {Egyp} . Esoterically and literally, the dwelling of the God Amen, or Amoun, or the hidden, secret god. Exoterically the kingdom of Osiris divided into fourteen parts, each of which was set aside for some purpose connected with the after state of the defunct. Among other things, in one of these was the Hall of Judgment. It was the Land of the West, the Secret Dwelling, the dark land, and the doorless house. But it was also Ker-neter , the abode of the gods, and the land of ghosts like the Hades of the Greeks . It was also the Good Father’s House (in which there are many mansions). The fourteen divisions comprised, among many others, Aanroo , the hall of the Two Truths, the Land of Bliss, Neter-xer the funeral (or burial) place Otamer-xar , the Silence-loving Fields, and also many other mystical halls and dwellings, one like the Sheol of the Hebrews, another like the Devachan of the Occultists, etc., etc. Out of the fifteen gates of the abode of Osiris, there were two chief ones, the gate of entrance or Rustu, and the gate of exit (reincarnation) Amh . But there was no room in Amenti to represent the orthodox Christian Hell. The worst of all was the Hall of the eternal Sleep and Darkness. As Lepsius has it, the defunct sleep (therein) in incorruptible forms, they wake not to see their brethren, they recognize no longer father and mother, their hearts feel nought toward their wife and children. This is the dwelling of the god All-Dead . . . . Each trembles to pray to him, for he hears not. Nobody can praise him, for he regards not those who adore him. Neither does he notice any offering brought to him. This god is Karmic Decree; the land of Silence — the abode of those who die absolute disbelievers, those dead from accident before their allotted time, and finally the dead on the threshold of Avichi , which is never in Amenti or any other subjective state, save in one case, but on this land of forced re-birth. These tarried not very long even in their state of heavy sleep, of oblivion and darkness, but, were carried more or less speedily toward Amh the exit gate.
  • (WG) Amenti, in the Egyptian system the dwelling of the God Amon; the same as Hades of the Greeks. In fact the state of man after death, as it was divided into various parts corresponding to the possible various conditions of the soul after death of the body.
  • (TG) Amesha Spentas {avesta} . Amshaspends. The six angels or divine Forces personified as gods who attend upon Ahura Mazda, of which he is the synthesis and the seventh. They are one of the prototypes of the Roman Catholic Seven Spirits or Angels with Michael as chief, or the Celestial Host; the Seven Angels of the Presence. They are the Builders, Cosmocratores, of the Gnostics and identical with the Seven Prajapatis, the Sephiroth, etc. .
  • (TG) Amitabha. The Chinese perversion of the Sanskrit Amrita Buddha, or the Immortal Enlightened, a name of Gautama Buddha. The name has such variations as Amita, Abida, Amitaya, etc., and is explained as meaning both Boundless Age and Boundless Light. The original conception of the ideal of an impersonal divine light has been anthropomorphized with time.
  • (WG) Amitabha, a Dhyani-Buddha; the celestial name of Gautama Buddha, much used in Japanese Buddhism. (Literally, of unmeasured splendor
  • (SKv) Amitabha ‘Unmeasured Splendor,’ ‘Boundless Light’; a compound of a — not; mita , the past participle of the verb-root ma — to measure; and abha — splendor. Parabrahman, or the Infinite All, is called Amitabha. In Buddhist literature we find that that Dhyani-Buddha, or that Over-Lord of Spiritual Beings who enlightened the human soul of Gautama, or, in other words, that Inner God of divine splendor which infilled the soul of Gautama the Buddha, is called the Amitabha-Buddha, or the ‘Buddha of Boundless Light.’
  • (TG) Ammon {Egyp} . One of the great gods of Egypt. Ammon or Amoun is far older than Amoun-Ra, and is identified with Baal. Hammon, the Lord of Heaven. Amoun-Ra was Ra the Spiritual Sun, the Sun of Righteousness, etc., for — the Lord God is a Sun. He is the God of Mystery and the hieroglyphics of his name are often reversed. He is Pan, All-Nature esoterically, and therefore the universe, and the Lord of Eternity. Ra, as declared by an old inscription, was begotten by Neith but not engendered. He is called the self begotten Ra, and created goodness from a glance of his fiery eye, as Set-Typhon created evil from his. As Ammon (also Amoun and Amen), Ra, he is Lord of the worlds enthroned on the Sun’s disk and appears in the abyss of heaven. A very ancient hymn spells the name Amen-ra , and hails the Lord of the thrones of the earth . . . Lord of Truth, father of the gods, maker of man, creator of the beasts, Lord of Existence, Enlightener of the Earth, sailing in heaven in tranquillity. . . . All hearts are softened at beholding thee, sovereign of life, health and strength! We worship thy spirit who alone made us, etc., etc. (See Bonwick’s Egyptian Belief Ammon Ra is called his mother’s husband and her son. It was to the ram-headed god that the Jews sacrificed lambs, and the lamb of Christian theology is a disguised reminiscence of the ram.
  • (TG) Ammonias Saccas. A great and good philosopher who lived in Alexandria between the second and third centuries of our era, and who was the founder of the Neo-Platonic School of Philaletheians or lovers of truth. He was of poor birth and born of Christian parents, but endowed with such prominent, almost divine, goodness as to be called Theodidaktos , the god-taught. He honoured that which was good in Christianity, but broke with it and the churches very early, being unable to find in it any superiority over the older religions.
  • (KT) Ammonius Saccas . A great and good philosopher who lived in Alexandria between the 2nd and 3rd centuries of our Era, the founder of the Neo-Platonic School of the Philalethians or lovers of truth. He was of poor birth and born of Christian parents, but endowed with such prominent, almost divine goodness as to be called Theodidaktos , the God-taught . He honoured that which was good in Christianity, but broke with it and the Churches at an early age, being unable to find in Christianity any superiority over the old religions.
  • (TG) Amrita {Sans} . The ambrosial drink or food of the gods; the food giving immortality. The elixir of life churned out of the ocean of milk in the Puranic allegory. An old Vedic term applied to the sacred Soma juice in the Temple Mysteries.
  • (VS) Amrita [[p. 28]] Immortality.
  • (WG) Amrita, the water of immortality obtained, according to an allegory in the Mahabharata, from the churning of the ocean by the suras and asuras, meaning the spiritual cultivation resulting from the conflict between our higher and lower nature; Soma juice; immortality; the collective body of immortals; the immortal light; final emancipation. (Literally, deathless
  • (GH) Amrita The nectar of the gods, by quaffing which immortality was attained; hence called the waters of immortality or the elixir of life. The amrita was produced when the gods used Ananta for churning the ocean. In the Vedas, amrita is applied to the mystical Soma, which makes a new man of the Initiate. Amri ta is beyond any guna [quality], for it is UNCONDITIONED per se; ( Secret Doctrine, I, p. 348). Mystically it is the drinking of the water of supernal wisdom and the spiritual bathing in its life-giving power. (Compound a, not; mrita, dying. Bhagavad-Gita, W. Q. Judge, p. 74)
  • (SKv) Amrita Immortality; a compound of a — not, and mrita , the past participle of the verb-root mri — to die. In Hindu literature Amrita is symbolized as the ‘Elixir of Life,’ as the ‘Ambrosial drink or food of the gods.’ Hence one who drank of this Amrita was one who partook of the life-giving waters of god-wisdom and thus became a master of life and death and radiated the spiritual glory with which he had united himself.
  • (SKf) Amrita-Yana, Pratyeka-Yana The Amrita-Yana is the ‘Pathway of Immortality’; a compound of a — not, and mrita — mortal, derived from the verb-root mri — to die, and yana — path. The Pratyeka-Yana is the ‘Pathway of Each for Himself’; a compound of the preposition prati — for or towards, and eka one. The Pratyeka-Yana is followed by spiritually great souls who strive for peace and wisdom for themselves. A Pratyeka-Buddha is such a one. It is the ‘Path of the Personality’, the Open and material Path to certain of the lower states of Nirvana. One who follows this lower and external aspect of the Upward Path is a disciple of ‘Head-learning,’ of the ‘Eye-Doctrine’ of the Wisdom Teachings. The Amrita-Yana is followed self-consciously by great-souled Initiates such as the Buddhas of Compassion. This is the ‘Pathway of Individuality,’ the Secret and Spiritual Path to a lofty Nirvana. One who follows this higher and inner aspect of the Upward Path is a disciple of ‘Soul-Wisdom,’ the ‘Heart-Doctrine’ of the Wisdom Teachings. The lesser Pathway awakens only the five lower principles in man, whereas the more glorious Pathway awakens the three highest principles in man.
  • (IN) Amshaspend(s) (Pahlavi) In Zoroastrianism, immortal benefactors, the six or seven creative deities, aspects of Ahura Mazda; similar to the elohim or sephiroth.
  • (TG) Amulam Mulam {Sans} . Lit., the rootless root; Mulaprakriti of the Vedantins, the spiritual root of nature.
  • (FY) Amulam Mulam ( Lit. The rootless root); Prakriti; the material of the universe.
  • (TG) Amun {Egyp} The Egyptian god of wisdom, who had only Initiates or Hierophants to serve him as priests.
  • (TG) Ana {Chald} . The invisible heaven or Astral Light; the heavenly mother of the terrestrial sea, Mar, whence probably the origin of Anna, the mother of Mary.
  • (TG) Anacalypsis {Greek} ., or an Attempt to withdraw the veil of the Saitic Isis, by Godfrey Higgins. This is a very valuable work, now only obtainable at extravagant prices; it treats of the origin of all myths, religions and mysteries, and displays an immense fund of classical erudition. [W. W. W]
  • (TG) Anagamin {Sans} . Anagam . One who is no longer to be reborn into the world of desire. One stage before becoming Arhat and ready for Nirvana. The third of the four grades of holiness on the way to final Initiation.
  • (TG) Anahata Chakram {Sans} . The seat or wheel of life; the heart, according to some commentators.
  • (FY) Anahatachakram, the heart, the seat of life.
  • (TG) Anahata Shabda {Sans} . The mystic voices and sounds heard by the Yogi at the incipient stage of his meditation. The third of the four states of sound, otherwise called Madhyama — the fourth state being when it is perceptible by the physical sense of hearing. The sound in its previous stages is not heard except by those who have developed their internal, highest spiritual senses. The four stages are called respectively, Para, Pashyanti, Madhyama and Vaikhari.
  • (SKv) Anahata-sabda Akasic or spiritual sounds and vibrations; a compound of an — not, ahata, the past participle of the verb-root ahan — to beat, to strike; and sabda — sound; hence a ‘sound not made by beating.’ These mystic sounds reach the ear only of one whose body, mind, and heart have become pure and free from illusion and its many evil results.
  • (WG) Anaisvarya, powerless, without supremacy.
  • (TG) Anaitia {Chald} . A derivation from Ana, a goddess identical with the Hindu Annapurana, one of the names of Kali — the female aspect of Siva — at her best.
  • (TG) Analogeticists. The disciples of Ammonius Saccas (q.v . ), so called because of their practice of interpreting all sacred legends, myths and mysteries by a principle of analogy and correspondence, which is now found in the Kabbalistic system, and pre-eminently so in the Schools of Esoteric Philosophy, in the East. (See The Twelve Signs of the Zodiac, by T. Subba Row in Five Years of Theosophy
  • (KT) Analogeticists. The disciples of Ammonius Saccas (vide supra) so called because of their practice of interpreting all sacred legends, myths, and mysteries by a principle of analogy and correspondence, which rule is now found in the Kabalistic system, and pre-eminently so in the schools of Esoteric philosophy in the East. ( Vide The Twelve Signs of the Zodiac, by T. Subba Row in Five years of Theosophy
  • (TG) Ananda {Sans} . Bliss, joy, felicity, happiness. A name of the favourite disciple of Gautama, the Lord Buddha.
  • (KT) Ananda {Sans} Bliss, joy, felicity, happiness. A name of a favourite disciple of Gautama, the Lord Buddha.
  • (FY) Ananda, bliss.
  • (WG) Ananda, bliss; an aspect of Parabrahmam.
  • (SP) Ananda — bliss.
  • (TG) Ananda-Lahari {Sans} . The wave of joy; a beautiful poem written by Sankaracharya, a hymn to Parvati, very mystical and occult.
  • (TG) Anandamaya-Kosha {Sans} . The illusive Sheath of Bliss, i.e ., the mayavic or illusory form, the appearance of that which is formless . Bliss, or the higher soul. The Vedantic name for one of the five Koshas or principles in man; identical with our Atma-Buddhi or the Spiritual Soul.
  • (FY) Ananda-maya-kosha, the blissful; the fifth sheath of the soul in the Vedantic system; the sixth principle.
  • (WG) Anandamaya-kosa, the spiritual soul, buddhi.
  • (TG) Ananga {Sans} . The Bodiless. An epithet of Kama, god of love.
  • (TG) Ananta-Sesha {Sans} . The Serpent of Eternity — the couch of Vishnu during Pralaya ( lit. , endless remain).
  • (WG) Ananta, infinite; a term applied to different deities, and to the seven-headed serpent couch upon which Krishna (the manifested Vishnu) reclines when he creates the worlds; the infinite beyond time and space.
  • (GH) Ananta The name of the serpent Sesha, represented as seven-headed and forming the couch of Vishnu , on which he reclines during the pralayas. Sesha, is called Ananta (meaning the unending, the infinite) because he perdures through manvantaras as well as during the pralayas, i.e. , during the periods of activity and quiescence. Ananta is represented as carrying a plow and a pestle, for during the churning of the waters for the purpose of making Amrita , the gods used Sesha as a great rope, twisting his tail around the mountain Mandara, and thus using it as a churn. Ananta is also the symbol of eternity, i.e., a serpent in the form of a circle. In the Puranas Sesha is said to have a thousand heads — an expansion of the legend. The seven beads of the serpent typifies the Seven principles throughout nature and man; the highest or middle head being the seventh. ( Secret Doctrine, I, p. 407) (Compound an, not; anta, ending. Bhagavad-Gita, W. Q. Judge, p. 74)
  • (GH) Ananta-Vijaya The name of the conch-shell of Yudhishthira. (Meaning of the word itself: eternally victorious. Bhagavad-Gita, W. Q. Judge, p. 4)
  • (TG) Anastasis {Greek} . The continued existence of the soul.
  • (FY) Anastasis, the continued existence of the soul.
  • (TG) Anatu {Chald} . The female aspect of Anu . She represents the Earth and Depth, while her consort represents the Heaven and Height. She is the mother of the god Hea, and produces heaven and earth. Astronomically she is Ishtar, Venus, the Ashtoreth of the Jews.
  • (WG) Anavasada, indifference to miseries.
  • (TG) Anaxagoras {Greek} . A famous Ionian philosopher who lived 500 B.C., studied philosophy under Anaximenes of Miletus, and settled in the days of Pericles at Athens. Socrates, Euripides, Archelaus and other distinguished men and philosophers were among his disciples and pupils. He was a most learned astronomer and was one of the first to explain openly that which was taught by Pythagoras secretly, namely, the movements of the planets, the eclipses of the sun and moon, etc. It was he who taught the theory of Chaos, on the principle that nothing comes from nothing; and of atoms, as the underlying essence and substance of all bodies, of the same nature as the bodies which they formed. These atoms, he taught, were primarily put in motion by Nous (Universal Intelligence, the Mahat of the Hindus), which Nous is an immaterial, eternal, spiritual entity; by this combination the world was formed, the material gross bodies sinking down, and the ethereal atoms (or fiery ether) rising and spreading in the upper celestial regions. Antedating modern science by over 2000 years, he taught that the stars were of the same material as our earth, and the sun a glowing mass; that the moon was a dark, uninhabitable body, receiving its light from the sun; the comets, wandering stars or bodies; and over and above the said science, he confessed himself thoroughly convinced that the real existence of things, perceived by our senses, could not be demonstrably proved. He died in exile at Lampsacus at the age of seventy-two.
  • (KT) Anaxagoras. A famous Ionian philosopher, who lived 500 B.C., studied philosophy under Anaximenes of Miletus, and settled in the days of Pericles, at Athens. Socrates, Euripides, Archelaus, and other distinguished men and philosophers were among his disciples and pupils. He was a most learned astronomer, and was one of the first to explain openly that which was taught by Pythagoras secretly — viz., the movements of the planets, the eclipses of the sun and moon, etc. It was he who taught the theory of chaos, on the principle that nothing comes from nothing, ex nihilo nihil fit — and of atoms, as the underlying essence and substance of all bodies, of the same nature as the bodies which they formed. These atoms, he taught, were primarily put in motion by nous (universal intelligence, the Mahat of the Hindus), which nous is an immaterial, eternal, spiritual entity; by this combination the world was formed, the material gross bodies sinking down, and the ethereal atoms (or fiery ether) rising and spreading in the upper celestial regions. Ante-dating modern science by over 2,000 years, he taught that the stars were of the same material as our earth, and the sun a glowing mass; that the moon was a dark uninhabitable body, receiving its light from the sun; and beyond the aforesaid science he confessed himself thoroughly convinced that the real existence of things, perceived by our senses, could not be demonstrably proved. He died in exile at Lampsacus, at the age of seventy-two.
  • (WG) Anayam, a measure of time, 180 days.
  • (TG) Ancients, The. A name given by Occultists to the seven creative Rays, born of Chaos, or the Deep.
  • (TG) Anda-Kataha {Sans} . The outer covering, or the shell of Brahma’s egg; the area within which our manifested universe is encompassed.
  • (WG) Andhatamisra, utter darkness of the soul.
  • (MO) Andrimner {Nors} [ and air + rimner computation, calendar] One of the boars that feed the One-harriers
  • (TG) Androgyne Goat (of Mendes See Baphomet.
  • (TG) Androgyne Ray The first differentiated ray; the Second Logos; Adam Kadmon in the Kabalah ; the male and female created he them, of the first chapter of Genesis.
  • (TG) Angaraka {Sans} . Fire Star; the planet Mars; in Tibetan, Mig-mar {Tibe}
  • (TG) Angirasas {Sans} . The generic name of several Puranic individuals and things; a class of Pitris , the ancestors of man; a river in Plaksha, one of the Sapta dwipas .
  • (TG) Angra Mainyus {avesta} . The Zoroastrian name for Ahriman; the evil spirit of destruction and opposition who (in the Vendidad is said by Ahura Mazda to counter-create by his witchcraft every beautiful land the God creates; for Angra Mainyu is all death.
  • (WG) Anima, a power or siddhi by which one can go into the smallest atom.
  • (TG) Anima Mundi {Latin} . The Soul of the World, the same as the Alaya of the Northern Buddhists; the divine essence which permeates, animates and informs all, from the smallest atom of matter to man and god. It is in a sense the seven-skinned mother of the stanzas in the Secret Doctrine, the essence of seven planes of sentience, consciousness and differentiation, moral and physical. In its highest aspect it is Nirvana, in its lowest Astral Light. It was feminine with the Gnostics, the early Christians and the Nazarenes; bisexual with other sects, who considered it only in its four lower planes. Of igneous, ethereal nature in the objective world of form (and then ether), and divine and spiritual in its three higher planes. When it is said that every human soul was born by detaching itself from the Anima Mundi, it means, esoterically, that our higher Egos are of an essence identical with It, which is a radiation of the ever unknown Universal ABSOLUTE.
  • (KT) Anima Mundi {Latin} The Soul of the World, the same as Alaya of the Northern Buddhists; the divine Essence which pervades, permeates, animates, and informs all things, from the smallest atom of matter to man and god. It is in a sense the seven-skinned Mother of the stanzas in the Secret Doctrine; the essence of seven planes of sentiency, consciousness, and differentiation, both moral and physical. In its highest aspect it is Nirvana; in its lowest, the Astral Light. It was feminine with the Gnostics, the early Christians, and the Nazarenes; bisexual with other sects, who considered it only in its four lower planes, of igneous and ethereal nature in the objective world of forms, and divine and spiritual in its three higher planes. When it is said that every human soul was born by detaching itself from the Anima Mundi, it is meant, esoterically, that our higher Egos are of an essence identical with It , and Mahat is a radiation of the ever unknown Universal ABSOLUTE.
  • (FY) Anima Mundi, the soul of the world.
  • (WG) Anima Mundi (Latin), the soul of the world. In Esotericism it means the actual soul or psychic force of the world; that is, that this globe as a whole with its creatures has its own soul.
  • (WG) Anishtubha, a peculiar Sanskrit metre.
  • (WG) Anitya, temporary, not everlasting.
  • (TG) Anjala {Sans} . One of the personified powers which spring from Brahma’s body — the Prajapatis.
  • (TG) Anjana {Sans} . A serpent, a son of Kasyapa Rishi.
  • (TG) Annamaya Kosha {Sans} . A Vedantic term. The same as Sthula Sharira or the physical body. It is the first sheath of the five sheaths accepted by the Vedantins, a sheath being the same as that which is called principle in Theosophy.
  • (FY) Annamaya Kosha, the gross body; the first sheath of the divine mona — Vedantic
  • (WG) Annamaya-kosa, the material body
  • (TG) Annapura {Sans} . See Ana.
  • (TG) Annedotus {Greek} . The generic name for the Dragons or Men-Fishes, of which there were five. The historian Berosus narrates that there rose out of the Erythraean Sea on several occasions a semi-daemon named Oannes or Annedotus, who although part animal yet taught the Chaldeans useful arts and everything that could humanise them. (See Lenormant Chaldean and also Oannes
  • (TG) Anoia {Greek} . Want of understanding, folly. Anoia is the name given by Plato and others to the lower Manas when too closely allied with Kama, which is irrational (agnoia) . The Greek word agnoia is evidently a derivation from and cognate to the Sanskrit word ajnana (phonetically, agnyana ) or ignorance, irrationality, absence of knowledge. (See Agnoia and Agnostic
  • (KT) Anoia {Greek} of understanding folly; and is the name applied by Plato and others to the lower Manas when too closely allied with Kama, which is characterised by irrationality (agnoia). The Greek agnoia is evidently a derivative of the Sanskrit ajnana (phonetically agnyana), or ignorance, irrationality, and absence of knowledge.
  • (TG) Anouki {Egyp} . A form of Isis; the goddess of life, from which name the Hebrew Ank , life. (See Anuki
  • (TG) Ansumat {Sans} . A Puranic personage, the nephew of 60,000 uncles King Sagara’s sons, who were reduced to ashes by a single glance from Kapila Rishi’s Eye.
  • (TG) Antahkarana {Sans}, or Antaskarana. The term has various meanings, which differ with every school of philosophy and sect. Thus Sankaracharya renders the word as understanding; others, as the internal instrument, the Soul, formed by the thinking principle and egoism; whereas the Occultists explain it as the path or bridge between the Higher and the Lower Manas, the divine Ego , and the personal Soul of man. It serves as a medium of communication between the two, and conveys from the Lower to the Higher Ego all those personal impressions and thoughts of men which can, by their nature, be assimilated and stored by the undying Entity, and be thus made immortal with it, these being the only elements of the evanescent Personality that survive death and time. It thus stands to reason that only that which is noble, spiritual and divine in man can testify in Eternity to his having lived.
  • (FY) Antahkarana, the internal instrument, the soul, formed by the thinking principle and egoism.
  • (VS) Antaskarana (III 9) [[p. 50]] Antaskarana is the lower Manas, the Path of communication or communion between the personality and the higher Manas or human Soul. At death it is destroyed as a Path or medium of communication, and its remains survive in a form as the Kamarupa the shell.
  • (WG) Antahkarana, the channel of communication between the higher and lower aspects of manas; the seat of thought and feeling. ( antar, within; karana, instrument or means of causing
  • (WG) Antaskarana, the same as antakarana .
  • (OG) Antaskarana — {Sans} Perhaps better spelled as antahkarana. A compound word: antar, interior, within; karana, sense organ. Occultists explain this word as the bridge between the higher and lower manas or between the spiritual ego and personal soul of man. Such is H. P. Blavatsky’s definition. As a matter of fact there are several antahkaranas in the human septenary constitution — one for every path or bridge between any two of the several monadic centers in man. Man is a microcosm, therefore a unified composite, a unity in diversity; and the antahkaranas are the links of vibrating consciousness-substance uniting these various centers.
  • (SKv) Antaskarana, Antahkarana Antaskarana (more correctly spelled Antahkarana) is a compound of antar — between or intermediate, and karana , the present participle form of kri — to do, hence meaning ‘effecting,’ ‘acting.’ Thus Antaskarana is an ‘intermediate instrument’ or ‘that which acts or works between.’ H. P. Blavatsky in The Voice of the Silence refers to the Antaskarana as the Lower Manas, that path or bridge of communication between the personality and the higher Manas or reincarnating part of man, and calls it that path that lies between thy Spirit and thy self. When an adept unites himself with his Spirit and has sacrificed his personal self to the Greater Impersonal Self within, the Antaskarana vanishes because there is no further need of it.
  • The word Antaskarana, in a more general sense, may be applied to any intermediary, a person or thing, acting between something higher and something lower than itself. A Messenger could be called the Antaskarana between the Masters of Wisdom and humanity.
  • (SP) Antaskarana or antahkarana — intermediate instrument, the link between higher and lower self.
  • (WG) Antaratma, mind, the human soul.
  • (WG) Antaryamin, that which is latent in all; a title of Ishwara.
  • (TG) Anthesteria {Greek} . The feast of Flowers (Floralia) : during this festival the rite of Baptism or purification was performed in the Eleusinian Mysteries in the temple lakes, the Limnae, when the Mystae were made to pass through the narrow gate of Dionysus, to emerge therefrom as full Initiates.
  • (TG) Anthropology. The Science of man; it embraces among other things: — Physiology, or that branch of natural science which discloses the mysteries of the organs and their functions in men, animals and plants; and also, and especially,- Psychology or the great, and in our days, too much neglected science of the soul, both as an entity distinct from the spirit, and in its relation to the spirit and body. In modern science, psychology deals only or principally with conditions of the nervous system, and almost absolutely ignores the psychical essence and nature. Physicians denominate the science of insanity psychology, and name the lunacy chair in medical colleges by that designation. (Isis Unveiled . )
  • (IU) Anthropology — the science of man; embracing among other things: Physiology, or that branch of natural science which discloses the mysteries of the organs and their functions in men, animals, and plants; and also, and especially, Psychology, or the great, and in our days, so neglected science of the soul, both as an entity distinct from the spirit and in its relations with the spirit and body. In modern science, psychology relates only or principally to conditions of the nervous system, and almost absolutely ignores the psychical essence and nature. Physicians denominate the science of insanity psychology, and name the lunatic chair in medical colleges by that designation.
  • (TG) Anthropomorphism {Greek} . From anthropos meaning man. The act of endowing god or gods with a human form and human attributes or qualities.
  • (KT) Anthropomorphism. From the Greek Anthropos, man. The act of endowing God or the gods with a human form and human attributes or qualities.
  • (TG) Anu {Sans} . An atom, a title of Brahma, who is said to be an atom just as is the infinite universe. A hint at the pantheistic nature of the god.
  • (TG) Anu {Chald} . One of the highest of Babylonian deities, King of Angels and Spirits, Lord of the city of Erech. He is the Ruler and God of Heaven and Earth. His symbol is a star and a kind of Maltese cross — emblems of divinity and sovereignty. He is an abstract divinity supposed to inform the whole expanse of ethereal space or heaven, while his wife informs the more material planes. Both are the types of the Ouranos and Gaia of Hesiod. They sprang from the original Chaos. All his titles and attributes are graphic and indicate health, purity physical and moral, antiquity and holiness. Anu was the earliest god of the city of Erech. One of his sons was Bil or Vil-Kan, the god of fire, of various metals, and of weapons. George Smith very pertinently sees in this deity a close connection with a kind of cross breed between the biblical Tubal Cain and the classical Vulcan . . . . who is considered to be moreover the most potent deity in relation to witchcraft and spells generally.
  • (WG) Anu, atom; also, one of the names of Brahma.
  • (SKs) Anu, Jivanu , Paramanu Anu literally means ‘infinitesimal’; probably a compound of a — not and nu — certainty, knowledge. Anu is an atom of matter, the chemical atom, the vehicle of Jivanu ( jiva — life, and anu — atom). The Jivanu is a life-atom or the soul of a chemical atom. Jivanu in its turn is the vehicle of Paramanu ( parama — highest, and anu — atom), which is the supreme or highest atom or the spirit of the chemical atom.
  • (TG) Anubis {Greek}. The dog-headed god, identical, in a certain aspect, with Horus. He is pre-eminently the god who deals with the disembodied, or the resurrected in post mortem life. Anepou is his Egyptian name. He is a psychopompic deity, the Lord of the Silent Land of the West, the land of the Dead, the preparer of the way to the other world, to whom the dead were entrusted, to be led by him to Osiris, the Judge. In short, he is the embalmer and the guardian of the dead. One of the oldest deities in Egypt, Mariette Bey having found the image of this deity in tombs of the Third Dynasty.
  • (WG) Anuddharsha, contentment, satisfaction with one’s condition.
  • (TG) Anugita {Sans} . One of the Upanishads. A very occult treatise. (See The Sacred Books of the East
  • (KT) Anugita {Sans} One of the Upanishads. A very occult treatise. ( Vide Clarendon Press series The Sacred Books of the East
  • (WG) Anugita, an episode from the fourteenth book of the Mahabharata. It gives the discourse between Krishna and Arjuna after the battle with which the Bhagavad-Gita opens. ( anu, after; gita , song: an after-song
  • (TG) Anugraha {Sans} . The eighth creation in the Vishnu Purana .
  • (TG) Anuki {Egyp} . See Anouki supra . The word Ank in Hebrew, means ‘my life’, my being, which is the personal pronoun Anochi, from the name of the Egyptian goddess Anouki , says the author of the Hebrew Mystery, or the Source of Measures .
  • (WG) Anumana, inference, drawing a conclusion from given premises, one of the means of obtaining knowledge according to the Sankhya or Nyaya systems.
  • (WG) Anumapaka, the basis of inference.
  • (WG) Anumata, producer of satisfaction in the doer of an act, though not himself concerned in action, still appearing as such.
  • (TG) Anumati {Sans} . The moon at the full; when from a god — Soma — she becomes a goddess.
  • (TG) Anumitis {Sans} . Inference, deduction in philosophy.
  • (FY) Anumiti, inference.
  • (TG) Anunit {Chald} . The goddess of Akkad; Lucifer, the morning star. Venus as the evening star was Ishtar of Erech.
  • (TG) Anunnaki {Chald} . Angels or Spirits of the Earth; terrestrial Elementals also.
  • (WG) Anusrava, Vedic tradition; acquired by repeated hearing.
  • (TG) Anuttara {Sans} . Unrivalled, peerless. Thus Anuttara Bodhi means unexcelled or unrivalled intelligence, Anuttara Dharma , unrivalled law or religion
  • (TG) Anyamsam Aniyasam {Sans} . Ano-vaniyansam (in Bhagavad gita ). Lit., the most atomic of the atomic; smallest of the small. Applied to the universal deity, whose essence is everywhere.
  • (WG) Anyathajnana, confounding of the attributes of one thing with those of another. ( anyatha , otherwise; jnana, knowing
  • (TG) Aour {Chald} . The synthesis of the two aspects of astro-etheric light; and the od — the life-giving, and the ob — the death-giving light.
  • (WG) Ap, water; air; the intermediate region.
  • (WG) Apah, (plural of AP), divinities and potencies.
  • (TG) Apam Napat {avesta} . A mysterious being, corresponding to the Fohat of the Occultists. It is both a Vedic and an Avestian name. Literally, the name means the Son of the Waters (of space, i.e ., Ether), for in the Avesta Apam Napat stands between the fire-yazatas and the water-yazatas (See Secret Doctrine, Vol. II., p. 400, note).
  • (WG) Apam-napat, Vedic name for Agni, or fire as sprung from water; intelligent force pervading nature, the light of the Logos, Fohat. ( apam , water; napat, offspring
  • (TG) Apana {Sans} . Inspirational breath; a practice in Yoga. Prana and apana are the expirational and the inspirational breaths. It is called vital wind in Anugita .
  • (WG) Apana, breathing out, expiration, one of the five vital airs, (opposed to prana); a cultivated physical faculty utilized in certain Hatha Yoga exercises.
  • (SKs) Apana, Samana , Vyana, Prana, Udana Each one of the seven principles of man’s constitution has its own particular ‘vital flow’ or ‘life-current’ which helps to build and sustain it. The full explanations and correspondences of these ‘Vital Airs’ are kept secret because of the danger of their misuse. The two higher ‘Vital Breaths’ are not spoken of in most exoteric literature. Hatha-Yoga, one of the lower aspects of Yoga training, treats of ways and means of controlling these different ‘breaths’; but without a greater knowledge of the mysteries of our inner nature, practice of this kind is not advisable, and in fact is discouraged. Apana is that ‘vital breath’ which casts out of the human system all that is not wanted there, that is, all waste material; a compound of apa — away, and the verb-root an — to breathe. Samana is that ‘vital breath’ which controls digestion and assimilation, and hence is that which carries on the chemical processes in the body; a compound of sam — together, and an — to breathe. Vyana is that ‘vital breath’ which governs the circulations in the body, and hence, is that which separates and disintegrates, and resists the destructive elements that are ever at work, and keeps the body in shape; a compound of vi — apart, a — towards, and an — to breathe. Prana is that ‘vital breath’ with which we are most familiar, that which controls our breathing, and which enables us to draw in vital essences from without and cast out through the breath certain gases which are destructive to the body; a compound of pra — forth, and the verb-root an — to breathe. Udana is that ‘vital breath’ which directs the vital currents of the body upwards to their sources, to the higher centers of the heart and brain. It therefore controls death; a compound of ud — up, and an — to breathe. Because these Pranas are the circulations of vital force in the body corresponding to the Circulations of the Cosmos, they are keys to an understanding of the Pathways of Life and Death.
  • (TG) Apap {Egyp}, in Greek Apophis . The symbolical Serpent of Evil. The Solar Boat and the Sun are the great Slayers of Apap in the Book of the Dead . It is Typhon, who having killed Osiris, incarnates in Apap, seeking to kill Horus. Like Taoer (or Ta-ap-oer ) the female aspect of Typhon, Apap is called the devourer of the Souls, and truly, since Apap symbolizes the animal body, as matter left soulless and to itself. Osiris, being, like all the other Solar gods, a type of the Higher Ego (Christos), Horus (his son) is the lower Manas or the personal Ego. On many a monument one can see Horus, helped by a number of dog-headed gods armed with crosses and spears, killing Apap. Says an Orientalist: The God Horus standing as conqueror upon the Serpent of Evil, may be considered as the earliest form of our well-known group of St. George (who is Michael) and the Dragon, or holiness trampling down sin. Draconianism did not die with the ancient religions, but has passed bodily into the latest Christian form of the worship.
  • (TG) Aparinamin {Sans} . The Immutable and the Unchangeable, the reverse of Parinamin, that which is subject to modification, differentiation or decay.
  • (TG) Aparoksha {Sans} . Direct perception.
  • (FY) Aparoksha, direct perception.
  • (TG) Apava {Sans} . Lit. He who sports in the Water. Another aspect of Narayana or Vishnu and of Brahma combined, for Apava, like the latter, divides himself into two parts, male and female, and creates Vishnu, who creates Viraj, who creates Manu. The name is explained and interpreted in various ways in Brahmanical literature.
  • (TG) Apavarga {Sans} . Emancipation from repeated births.
  • (FY) Apavarya, emancipation from repeated births.
  • (WG) Apavarga, the emancipation of the soul from the misery of repeated re-births; final beatitude. ( apa , from, away; varga, purified, exempt
  • (TG) Apis {Egyp}, or Hapi-ankh . The living deceased one or Osiris incarnate in the sacred white Bull. Apis was the bull-god that, on reaching the age of twenty-eight, the age when Osiris was killed by Typhon — was put to death with great ceremony. It was not the Bull that was worshipped but the Osiridian symbol; just as Christians kneel now before the Lamb, the symbol of Jesus Christ, in their churches.
  • (TG) Apocrypha {Greek} . Very erroneously explained and adopted as doubtful, or spurious. The word means simply secret, esoteric, hidden .
  • (TG) Apollo Belvidere. Of all the ancient statues of Apollo, the son of Jupiter and Latona, called Phoebes, Helios, the radiant and the Sun, the best and most perfect is the one known by this name, which is in the Belvidere gallery of the Vatican at Rome. It is called the Pythian Apollo, as the god is represented in the moment of his victory over the serpent Python. The statue was found in the ruins of Antium, in 1503.
  • (KT) Apollo Belvidere. Of all the ancient statues of Apollo, the son of Jupiter and Latona, called Phoebus, Helios, the radiant, and the Sun — the best and most perfect is the one of this name, which is in the Belvidere Gallery in the Vatican, at Rome. It is called the Pythian Apollo, as the god is represented in the moment of his victory over the serpent Python. The statue was found in the ruins of Antium in 1503.
  • (TG) Apollonius of Tyana {Greek} . A wonderful philosopher born in Cappadocia about the beginning of the first century; an ardent Pythagorean, who studied the Phoenician sciences under Euthydemus; and Pythagorean philosophy and other studies under Euxenus of Heraclea. According to the tenets of this school he remained a vegetarian the whole of his long life, fed only on fruit and herbs, drank no wine, wore vestments made only of plant-fibres, walked barefooted, and let his hair grow to its full length, as all the Initiates before and after him. He was initiated by the priests of the temple of AEsculapius (Asclepios) at AEgea, and learnt many of the miracles for healing the sick wrought by the god of medicine. Having prepared himself for a higher initiation by a silence of five years, and by travel, visiting Antioch, Ephesus, Pamphylia and other parts, he journeyed via Babylon to India, all his intimate disciples having abandoned him, as they feared to go to the land of enchantments. A casual disciple, Damis, however, whom he met on his way, accompanied him in his travels. At Babylon he was initiated by the Chaldees and Magi, according to Damis, whose narrative was copied by one named Philostratus a hundred years later. After his return from India, he showed himself a true Initiate, in that the pestilences and earthquakes, deaths of kings and other events, which he prophesied duly happened. At Lesbos, the priests of Orpheus, being jealous of him, refused to initiate him into their peculiar mysteries, though they did so several years later. He preached to the people of Athens and other cities the purest and noblest ethics, and the phenomena he produced were as wonderful as they were numerous and well attested. How is it, enquires Justin Martyr in dismay — how is it that the talismans (telesmata) of Apollonius have power, for they prevent, as we see, the fury of the waves and the violence of the winds, and the attacks of the wild beasts; and whilst our Lord’s miracles are preserved by tradition alone, those of Apollonius are most numerous and actually manifested in present facts? ). But an answer is easily found to this in the fact that after crossing the Hindu Kush, Apollonius had been directed by a king to the abode of the Sages , whose abode it may be to this day, by whom he was taught unsurpassed knowledge. His dialogues with the Corinthian Menippus indeed give us the esoteric catechism and disclose (when understood) many an important mystery of nature. Apollonius was the friend, correspondent and guest of kings and queens, and no marvellous or magic powers are better attested than his. At the end of his long and wonderful life he opened an esoteric school at Ephesus, and died aged almost one hundred years.
  • (KT) Apollonius of Tyana. A wonderful philosopher born in Cappadocia about the beginning of the first century; an ardent Pythagorean, who studied the Phoenician sciences under Euthydemus, and Pythagorean philosophy and other subjects under Euxenus of Heraclea. According to the tenets of the Pythagorean school he remained a vegetarian the whole of his long life, ate only fruit and herbs, drank no wine, wore vestments made only of plant fibres, walked barefooted and let his hair grow to the full length, as all the Initiates have done before and after him. He was initiated by the priests of the temple of aesculapius (Asclepios) at aegae, and learnt many of the miracles for healing the sick wrought by the God of medicine. Having prepared himself for a higher initiation by a silence of five years, and by travel — visiting Antioch, Ephesus, and Pamphylia and other parts — he repaired via Babylon to India, alone, all his disciples having abandoned him as they feared to go to the land of enchantments. A casual disciple, Damis, whom he met on his way, accompanied him, however, on his travels. At Babylon he got initiated by the Chaldees and Magi, according to Damis, whose narrative was copied by one named Philostratus one hundred years later. After his return from India, he showed himself a true Initiate in that the pestilence, earthquakes, deaths of kings and other events, which he prophesied, duly happened. At Lesbos, the priests of Orpheus got jealous of him, and refused to initiate him into their peculiar mysteries, though they did so several years later. He preached to the people of Athens and other States the purest and noblest ethics, and the phenomena he produced were as wonderful as they were numerous, and well authenticated. How is it, inquires Justin Martyr, in dismay, how is it that the talismans (telesmata) of Apollonius have power, for they prevent, as we see, the fury of the waves, and the violence of the winds, and the attacks of wild beasts; and whilst our Lord’s miracles are preserved by tradition alone, those of Apollonius are most numerous, and actually manifested in present facts? But an answer is easily found to this, in the fact that, after crossing the Hindu Koosh, Apollonius had been directed by a king to the abode of the Sages, whose abode it may be to this day, and who taught him their unsurpassed knowledge. His dialogues, with the Corinthian Menippus, give to us truly the esoteric catechism, and disclose (when understood) many an important mystery of nature. Apollonius was the friend, correspondent, and guest of kings and queens, and no wonderful or magic powers are better attested than his. Towards the close of his long and wonderful life he opened an esoteric school at Ephesus, and died at the ripe old age of one hundred years.
  • (TG) Aphorreta {Greek} . Secret instructions upon esoteric subjects given during the Egyptian and Grecian Mysteries.
  • (FY) Apporrheta, secret discourses in Egyptian and Grecian mysteries.
  • (WG) Aprithaksiddha, inseparable and eternal union, such as that existing between Chit, Achit and Isvara.
  • (TG) Apsaras {Sans} . An Undine or Water-Nymph, from the Paradise or Heaven of Indra. The Apsarases are in popular belief the wives of the gods and called Suranganas, and by a less honourable term, Sumad-atmajas or the daughters of pleasure, for it is fabled of them that when they appeared at the churning of the Ocean neither Gods (Suras) nor Demons (Asuras) would take them for legitimate wives. Urvasi and several others of them are mentioned in the Vedas . In Occultism they are certain sleep-producing aquatic plants, and inferior forces of nature.
  • (TG) Ar-Abu Nasr-al-Farabi , called in Latin Alpharabius, a Persian, and the greatest Aristotelian philosopher of the age. He was born in 950 A.D., and is reported to have been murdered in 1047. He was an Hermetic philosopher and possessed the power of hypnotizing through music, making those who heard him play the lute laugh, weep, dance and do what he liked. Some of his works on Hermetic philosophy may be found in the Library of Leyden.
  • (TG) Arahat {Sans} . Also pronounced and written Arhat, Arhan, Rahat,, the worthy one, lit., deserving divine honours. This was the name first given to the Jain and subsequently to the Buddhist holy men initiated into the esoteric mysteries. The Arhat is one who has entered the best and highest path, and is thus emancipated from re-birth.
  • (FY) Arahats ( Lit. the worthy ones), the initiated holy men of the Buddhist and Jain faiths.
  • (SP) Arhat — literally worthy one, Buddhist term for one who has reached personal enlightenment.
  • (TG) Arani {Sans} . The female Arani is a name of the Vedic Aditi (esoterically, the womb of the world). Avani is a Swastika , a disc-like wooden vehicle, in which the Brahmins generated fire by friction with pramantha, a stick, the symbol of the male generator. A mystic ceremony with a world of secret meaning in it and very sacred, perverted into phallic significance by the materialism of the age.
  • (WG) Aranis, the two pieces of wood used in producing, by attrition, the sacred fire.
  • (TG) Aranyaka {Sans} . Holy hermits, sages who dwelt in ancient India in forests. Also a portion of the Vedas containing Upanishads, etc.
  • (VS) Aranyaka (II 14) [[p. 30]] A hermit who retires to the jungles and lives in a forest, when becoming a Yogi.
  • (FY) Aranyakas, holy sages dwelling in forests.
  • (SKv) Aranyaka, Aranyaka , Aranyaukas Aranyaka is a forest; Aranyaka a holy hermit or sage who dwelt in ancient India in forests. Aran-yaukas is also a forest-dweller or ‘one who makes the aranya or forest his okas or dwelling.’
  • (TG) Araritha {Hebr} . A very famous seven-lettered Kabbalistic wonder-word; its numeration is 813; its letters are collected by Notaricon from the sentence one principle of his unity, one beginning of his individuality, his change is unity. .
  • (TG) Arasa Maram {Sans} . The Hindu sacred tree of knowledge. In occult philosophy a mystic word.
  • (TG) Arba-il {Chald} . The Four Great Gods. Arba is Aramaic for four, and il is the same as Al or El. Three male deities, and a female who is virginal yet reproductive, form a very common ideal of Godhead.
  • (TG) Archaeus {Greek} . The Ancient. Used of the oldest manifested deity; a term employed in the Kabalah ; archaic, old, ancient.
  • (TG) Archangel {Greek} . Highest supreme angel. From the Greek arch, chief or primordial, and angelos, messenger.
  • (KT) Archangel. Highest, supreme angel. From the two Greek words, arch, first, and angelos, messenger.
  • (TG) Archetypal Universe The ideal universe upon which the objective world was built. [W.W.W.]
  • (TG) Archobiosis {Greek} . Primeval beginning of life.
  • (TG) Archons {Greek} . In profane and biblical language rulers and princes; in Occultism, primordial planetary spirits.
  • (TG) Archontes {Greek} . The archangels after becoming Ferouers or their own shadows, having mission on earth; a mystic ubiquity; implying a double life; a kind of hypostatic action, one of purity in a higher region, the other of terrestrial activity exercised on our plane. (See Iamblichus, De Mysterus II.,
  • (TG) Ardath {Hebr} . This word occurs in the Second Book of Esdras, ix., 26. The name has been given to one of the recent occult novels where much interest is excited by the visit of the hero to a field in the Holy Land so named; magical properties are attributed to it. In the Book of Esdras the prophet is sent to this field called Ardath where no house is builded and bidden eat there only the flowers of the field, taste no flesh, drink no wine, and pray unto the highest continually, and then will I come and talk with thee. [w.w.w.]
  • (SKv) Ardha-Matra The mystic syllable AUM is said to represent the Kala-hansa or ‘Swan of Time.’ The A represents the bird’s right wing, the U the left wing, and the M its tail. The Ardha-Matra, the ‘half-meter’ or that shifting tone which is made as one passes in tone from the A to the U, and from the U to the M, corresponds to the bird’s head, or the consciousness guiding the pronunciation, hence symbolizing the consciousness guiding the onward progress of the mystic flight of this Bird of Eternity.
  • (TG) Ardha-Nari {Sans} . Lit. , half-woman. Siva represented as Androgynous, as half male and half female, a type of male and female energies combined. (See occult diagram
  • (TG) Ardhanariswara {Sans} . Lit., the bi-sexual lord. Esoterically, the unpolarized states of cosmic energy symbolised by the Kabalistic Sephira, Adam Kadmon,
  • (FY) Ardhanariswara, ( Lit. the bi-sexual Lord); the unpolarized state of cosmic energy; the bi-sexual Sephira, Adam Kadmon.
  • (TG) Ares. The Greek name for Mars, god of war; also a term used by Paracelsus, the differentiated Force in Cosmos.
  • (TG) Argha {Chald} . The ark, the womb of Nature; the crescent moon, and a life-saving ship; also a cup for offerings, a vessel used for religious ceremonies.
  • (WG) Arghya, a libation to gods or saints, of rice, flowers, etc., with water, or of water only, in a small boat-shaped vessel.
  • (TG) Arghyanath {Sans} . Lit. , lord of libations.
  • (WG) Arghyanath, lord of libations, a title of the Maha-Chohan.
  • (WG) Arghya-varsha, the land of libations; the mystery name of the land whence the Kalki avatar is expected to come.
  • (IN) Arhat {Sans} High initiate; in Buddhism, those who have attained nirvana; more generally, an ascetic.
  • (VS) A New Arhan (III 36) [[p. 72]] Meaning that a new and additional Saviour of mankind is born, who will lead men to final Nirvana i.e., after the end of the life-cycle.
  • (KT) Arhat {Sans}, also pronounced and written Arahat, Arhan, Rahat, etc., the worthy one; a perfected Arya, one exempt from reincarnation; deserving Divine honours. This was the name first given to the Jain, and subsequently to the Buddhist holy men initiated into the esoteric mysteries. The Arhat is one who has entered the last and highest path, and is thus emancipated from rebirth.
  • (WG) Arhats, initiated holy men of the Buddhist and Jaina faiths; often used synonymously with Rishi, Mahatma, and Adept. (Literally, worthy ones
  • (SKv) Arhan, Aryahata The word Arhan is another form for Arhat. Hence a Buddha is often called an Arhan because of his superior wisdom and perfection. Aryahata is the Path of Arhatship or of that state of spiritual holiness leading to Nirvanic bliss.
  • (SP) Arhat — literally worthy one, Buddhist term for one who has reached personal enlightenment.
  • (TG) Arian. A follower of Arius, a presbyter of the Church in Alexandria in the fourth century. One who holds that Christ is a created and human being, inferior to God the Father, though a grand and noble man, a true adept versed in all the divine mysteries.
  • (KT) Arians. The followers of Arius, a presbyter of the Church in Alexandria in the fourth century. One who holds that Christ is a created and human being, inferior to God the Father, though a grand and noble man, a true adept, versed in all the divine mysteries.
  • (TG) Aristobulus {Greek} . An Alexandrian writer, and an obscure philosopher. A Jew who tried to prove that Aristotle explained the esoteric thoughts of Moses.
  • (KT) Aristobulus. An Alexandrian writer, and an obscure philosopher. A Jew who tried to prove that Aristotle explained the esoteric thoughts of Moses.
  • (TG) Arithmomancy {Greek} . The science of correspondences between gods, men, and numbers, as taught by Pythagoras. [W.W.W.]
  • (TG) Arjuna {Sans} . Lit. , the white. The third of the five Brothers Pandu or the reputed Sons of Indra (esoterically the same as Orpheus). A disciple of Krishna, who visited him and married Su-bhadra, his sister, besides many other wives, according to the allegory. During the fratricidal war between the Kauravas and the Pandavas, Krishna instructed him in the highest philosophy, while serving as his charioteer. (See Bhagavad Gita
  • (WG) Arjuna, a personality in the Bhagavat Gita, son and avatar of Indra, allegorically representing man; also spoken of as Nara. ( arjuna, silver white; mara, man, the primal man, a hero
  • (GH) Arjuna The hero of the Bhagavad-Gita depicted as the disciple of Krishna is one of the most interesting and lovable characters in the Mahabharata. He is the third of the Pandava brothers, the son of Indra by Pritha (or Kunti) — hence referred to throughout the poem as the son of Pritha, or again as the son of Kunti (in Sanskrit Partha and Kaunteya). His individual exploits are related at great length in the epic, each one being of interest. As the warrior-hero par excellence, his achievements are foremost in the martial line; thus Arjuna is represented as the favorite pupil of Drona , as being instructed in arms by the gods themselves (from whom he obtained celestial weapons as well as his remarkable bow, Gandiva, q.v. ). By means of his prowess in arms he was chosen by Draupadi as husband at her svayamvara (‘self-choice’). During a self-imposed exile, Arjuna traveled to Patala (the Antipodes, the name by which America was known in ancient Hindusthan) and there was wooed by the princess Ulupi who wedded him (see Secret Doctrine, II, p. 214). Arjuna is best known in his relationship with Krishna: the manner in which Krishna became Arjuna’s charioteer is related as follows. When it became apparent that a war was to be waged between the Kurus and the Pandavas, both Duryodhana and Arjuna hastened to Krishna in order to obtain his aid. Duryodhana arrived first, but Krishna was in bed asleep: he was still reposing when Arjuna reached the palace, so he stationed himself at the foot of Krishna’s bed, so that upon awaking his eyes rested on his brother-in-law (Arjuna was married to Krishna’s sister, Subhadra). Immediately each hero implored Krishna to aid his cause: but the latter declared that he would not fight in the coming battle, that he would act solely as an advisor; and as each was entitled to his help, Krishna gave his petitioners the choice of his splendidly equipped army to the one side, and to the other himself as advisor. Duryodhana having arrived first was given first choice, and he chose the army, whereupon Arjuna was overjoyed to accept Krishna as his advisor, and the latter agreed to act as his charioteer in the battle. Because of this Arjuna was victorious. Of especial interest is the fact that there is a second dialog between Krishna and Arjuna in the Mahabharata, known as the Anu-gita, which is even more philosophical and more occult than the first dialog, but as it is more difficult of comprehension and deals with more abstruse subjects it is not so well known. Arjuna, who was called Nara, was intended to represent the human monad. ( Notes on the Bhagavad-Gita, p. 11) Krishna is the seventh principle in man, and his gift of his sister in marriage to Arjuna typifies the union between the sixth and the fifth. ( Notes on the Bhagavad-Gita , p. 9) (Meaning of the word itself: white, clear; cf. rijra and (The following word is derived from the verbal root:) raj or (The following word is derived from the verbal root:) ranj, to redden, to glow, also illuminate. Bhagavad-Gita, W. Q. Judge, p. 2)
  • (SP) Arjuna — the third of the five sons of Pandu in the Mahabharata, and the hero with whom Krsna converses in the Bhagavad-gita .
  • (TG) Arka {Sans} . The Sun.
  • (FY) Arka, sun.
  • (TG) Arkites. The ancient priests who were attached to the Ark, whether of Isis, or the Hindu Argua , and who were seven in number, like the priests of the Egyptian Tat or any other cruciform symbol of the three and the four, the combination of which gives a male-female number. The Argha (or ark) was the four-fold female principle, and the flame burning over it the triple lingham .
  • (TG) Ark of Isis. At the great Egyptian annual ceremony, which took place in the month of Athyr, the boat of Isis was borne in procession by the priests, and Collyrian cakes or buns, marked with the sign of the cross (Tat), were eaten. This was in commemoration of the weeping of Isis for the loss of Osiris, the Athyr festival being very impressive. Plato refers to the melodies on the occasion as being very ancient, writes Mr. Bonwick (Eg. Belief and Mod. Thought) . The Miserere in Rome has been said to be similar to its melancholy cadence, and to be derived from it. Weeping, veiled virgins followed the ark. The Nornes, or veiled virgins, wept also for the loss of our Saxon forefathers’ god, the ill-fated but good Baldur.
  • (TG) Ark of the Covenant. Every ark-shrine, whether with the Egyptians, Hindus, Chaldeans or Mexicans, was a phallic shrine, the symbol of the yoni or womb of nature. The seket of the Egyptians, the ark, or sacred chest, stood on the ara — its pedestal. The ark of Osiris, with the sacred relics of the god, was of the same size as the Jewish ark, says S. Sharpe, the Egyptologist, carried by priests with staves passed through its rings in sacred procession, as the ark round which danced David, the King of Israel. Mexican gods also had their arks. Diana, Ceres, and other goddesses as well as gods had theirs. The ark was a boat — a vehicle in every case. Thebes had a sacred ark 300 cubits long, and the word Thebes is said to mean ark in Hebrew, which is but a natural recognition of the place to which the chosen people are indebted for their ark. Moreover, as Bauer writes, the Cherub was not first used by Moses. The winged Isis was the cherub or Arieh in Egypt, centuries before the arrival there of even Abram or Sarai. The external likeness of some of the Egyptian arks, surmounted by their two winged human figures, to the ark of the covenant, has often been noticed. (Bible Educator . ) And not only the external but the internal likeness and sameness are now known to all. The arks, whether of the covenant, or of honest, straightforward, Pagan symbolism, had originally and now have one and the same meaning. The chosen people appropriated the idea and forgot to acknowledge its source. It is the same as in the case of the Urim and Thummin . In Egypt, as shown by many Egyptologists, the two objects were the emblems of the Two Truths . Two figures of Re and Thmei were worn on the breast-plate of the Egyptian High Priest. Thme, plural thmin, meant truth in Hebrew. Wilkinson says the figure of Truth had closed eyes. Rosellini speaks of the Thmei being worn as a necklace. Diodorus gives such a necklace of gold and stones to the High Priest when delivering judgment. The Septuagint translates Thummin as Truth Belief
  • (TG) Aroueris {Greek} . The god Harsiesi, who was the elder Horus. He had a temple at Ambos. If we bear in mind the definition of the chief Egyptian gods by Plutarch, these myths will become more comprehensible; as he well says: Osiris represents the beginning and principle; Isis, that which receives; and Horus, the compound of both. Horus engendered between them, is not eternal nor incorruptible, but, being always in generation, he endeavours by vicissitudes of imitations, and by periodical passion (yearly re-awakening to life) to continue always young, as if he should never die. Thus, since Horus is the personified physical world, Aroueris, or the elder Horus, is the ideal Universe; and this accounts for the saying that he was begotten by Osiris and Isis when these were still in the bosom of their mother — Space. There is indeed, a good deal of mystery about this god, but the meaning of the symbol becomes clear once one has the key to it.
  • (TG) Artephius. — A great Hermetic philosopher, whose true name was never known and whose works are without dates, though it is known that he wrote his Secret Book in the 12th century. Legend has it that he was one thousand years old at that time. There is a book on dreams by him in the possession of an Alchemist, now in Bagdad, in which he gives out the secret of seeing the past, the present, and the future, in sleep, and of remembering the things seen. There are but two copies of this manuscript extant. The book on Dreams by the Jew Solomon Almulus, published in Hebrew at Amsterdam in 1642, has a few reminiscences from the former work of Artephius.
  • (TG) Artes {Egyp} . The Earth; the Egyptian god Mars.
  • (TG) Artufas. A generic name in South America and the islands for temples of nagalism or serpent worship.
  • (TG) Arundhati {Sans} . The Morning Star; Lucifer-Venus.
  • (TG) Arupa {Sans} . Bodiless, formless, as opposed to rupa, body, or form.
  • (WG) Arupa, formless, colorless. ( a , not; rupa, color, form
  • (OG) Arupa {Sans} A compound word meaning formless, but this word formless is not to be taken so strictly as to mean that there is no form of any kind whatsoever; it merely means that the forms in the spiritual worlds (the arupa-lokas) are of a spiritual type or character, and of course far more ethereal than are the forms of the rupa-lokas. Thus in the arupa-lokas, or the spiritual worlds or spheres or planes, the vehicle or body of an entity is to be conceived of rather as an enclosing sheath of energic substance. We can conceive of an entity whose form or body is entirely of electrical substance — as indeed our own bodies are in the last analysis of modern science. But such an entity with an electrical body, although distinctly belonging to the rupa worlds, and to one of the lowest rupa worlds, would merely, by comparison with our own gross physical bodies, seem to us to be bodiless or formless. ( See also Rupa, Loka)
  • (SKf) Arupa, Rupa Rupa is body or form. Arupa, a compound of a — not, and rupa — body, is applied to something without form or body. The three highest of the Lokas and Talas and the five higher Globes of the Planetary Chain are called Arupa, not because they have no material form, but because to our physical senses they would appear as formless. The four lower Lokas and Talas and the seven lower Globes are called Rupa worlds and Globes because their bodies are of a substantial nature more like unto our own.
  • (IN) Arupa {Sans} Formless, unmanifest.
  • (TG) Arvaksrotas {Sans} . The seventh creation, that of man, in the Vishnu Purana .
  • (TG) Arwaker {Nors} . Lit., early waker. The horse of the chariot of the Sun driven by the maiden Sol, in the Eddas .
  • (TG) Arya {Sans} . Lit. , the holy; originally the title of Rishis, those who had mastered the Aryasatyani and entered the Aryanimarga path to Nirvana or Moksha, the great four-fold path. But now the name has become the epithet of a race, and our Orientalists, depriving the Hindu Brahmans of their birth-right, have made Aryans of all Europeans. In esotericism, as the four paths, or stages, can be entered only owing to great spiritual development and growth in holiness, they are called the four fruits. The degrees of Arhatship, called respectively Srotapatti, Sakridagamin, Anagamin, and Arhat, or the four classes of Aryas, correspond to these four paths and truths.
  • (WG) Arya, a man of the Vedic Indian tribes, an Aryan. (Literally, one of the faithful
  • (GH) Arya A respectable, honorable, or faithful man; also an inhabitant of Aryavarta (or India). In later times the word is used as a title for the first three castes of ancient India. (The following word is derived from the verbal root:) ri to rise, to tend upwards. Bhagavad-Gita , W. Q. Judge, p. iii)
  • (SK)o Arya, Aryavarta , Hindu, Hindusthan The word Arya , meaning ‘worthy’ or ‘holy,’ was a title given to the wise and spiritual men of old India. Aryavarta, the ancient name of northern and central India, was the avarta or abode of the Aryas. Our word Aryan, now applied to a Race, is derived from Arya. A Hindu is a native Aryan of India. The name Hindu is also applied to one who follows one of India’s many popular religions, classified under the name of Hinduism.
  • The river Sindhu around which the early migrating Aryans settled was called by the Persians Hindhu. In time these Persians called their Aryan brethren Hindus , and they named the country into which they spread Hindusthan — the sthana or ‘abode’ of the Hindus.
  • (TG) Arya-Bhata {Sans} . The earliest Hindu algebraist and astronomer, with the exception of Asura Maya ; the author of a work called Arya Siddhanta, a system of Astronomy.
  • (TG) Arya-Dasa {Sans} . Lit. , Holy Teacher. A great sage and Arhat of the Mahasamghika school.
  • (TG) Aryahata {Sans} . The Path of Arhatship, or of holiness.
  • (VS) Aryahata Path [[p. 69]] From the Sanscrit Arhat or Arhan.
  • (GH) Aryaman The chief of the Pitris . Also the name of one of the Adityas . (Meaning of the word itself: a bosom friend. Bhagavad-Gita , W. Q. Judge, p. 75)
  • ARYAN — Aryan in the theosophical sense has nothing at all to do with ‘aryan’ as popularized during World War II, as evidenced by the descriptions below:
  • (KT) Aryan {Sans} Lit., the holy; those who had mastered the Aryasatyani and entered the Aryamarga path to Nirvana or Moksha, the great fourfold path. They were originally known as Rishis. But now the name has become the epithet of a race, and our Orientalists, depriving the Hindu Brahmans of their birthright, have made Aryans of all Europeans. Since, in esotericism the four paths or stages can only be entered through great spiritual development and growth in holiness, they are called the Aryamarga. The degrees of Arhatship, called respectively Srotapatti, Sakridagamin, Anagamin, and Arhat, or the four classes of Aryas, correspond to the four paths and truths.
  • (IN) Aryan Race fr arya {Sans} noble) Indo-European people who migrated into Northern India, Aryavarta; in theosophy applied to the 5th root-race (present humanity).
  • (GH) Aryana (see Aryaman)
  • (TG) Aryasangha {Sans} . The founder of the first Yogacharya School. This Arhat, a direct disciple of Gautama, the Buddha, is most unaccountably mixed up and confounded with a personage of the same name, who is said to have lived in Ayodhya (Oude) about the fifth or sixth century of our era, and taught Tantrika worship in addition to the Yogacharya system. Those who sought to make it popular, claimed that he was the same Aryasangha, that had been a follower of Sakyamuni, and that he was 1,000 years old. Internal evidence alone is sufficient to show that the works written by him and translated about the year 600 of our era, works full of Tantra worship, ritualism, and tenets followed now considerably by the red-cap sects in Sikkhim, Bhutan, and Little Tibet, cannot be the same as the lofty system of the early Yogacharya school of pure Buddhism, which is neither northern nor southern, but absolutely esoteric. Though none of the genuine Yogacharya books (the Narjol chodpa ) have ever been made public or marketable, yet one finds in the Yogacharya Bhumi Shastra of the pseudo -Aryasangha a great deal from the older system, into the tenets of which he may have been initiated. It is, however, so mixed up with Sivaism and Tantrika magic and superstitions, that the work defeats its own end, notwithstanding its remarkable dialectical subtilty. How unreliable are the conclusions at which our Orientalists arrive, and how contradictory the dates assigned by them, may be seen in the case in hand. While Csoma de Koros (who, by-the-bye, never became acquainted with the Gelukpa (yellow-caps), but got all his information from red-cap Lamas of the Borderland), places the pseudo Aryasangha in the seventh century of our era; Wassiljew, who passed most of his life in China, proves him to have lived much earlier; and Wilson (see Royal Asiatic Society Vol. VI., p. 240), speaking of the period when Aryasangha’s works, which are still extant in Sanskrit, were written, believes it now established, that they have been written at the latest, from a century and a half before, to as much after , the era of Christianity. At all events since it is beyond dispute that the Mahayana religious works were all written far before Aryasangha’s time — whether he lived in the second century B.C., or the seventh A.D. — and that these contain all and far more of the fundamental tenets of the Yogacharya system, so disfigured by the Ayodhyan imitator — the inference is that there must exist somewhere a genuine rendering free from popular Sivaism and left-hand magic.
  • (WG) Aryasangha, the whole body of the Aryans; name of the founder of the Yogachara (Yogakara) school of Buddhism.
  • (TG) Aryasatyani {Sans} . The four truths or the four dogmas, which are (1) Dukha , or that misery and pain are the unavoidable concomitants of sentient (esoterically, physical) existence; (2) Samudaya , the truism that suffering is intensified by human passions; (3) Nirodha, that the crushing out and extinction of all such feelings are possible for a man on the path; (4) Marga, the narrow way, or that path which leads to such a blessed result.
  • (TG) Aryavarta {Sans} . The land of the Aryas, or India. The ancient name for Northern India, where the Brahmanical invaders (from the Oxus say the Orientalists) first settled. It is erroneous to give this name to the whole of India, since Manu gives the name of the land of the Aryas only to the tract between the Himalaya and the Vindhya ranges, from the eastern to the western sea.
  • (FY) Aryavarta, the ancient name of Northern India where the Brahmanical invaders first settled.
  • (WG) Aryavarta, the sacred land of the Aryans; India.
  • (TG) Asakrit Samadhi {Sans} . A certain degree of ecstatic contemplation. A stage in Samadhi .
  • (WG) Asakti, disability.
  • (TG) Asana {Sans} . The third stage of Hatha Yoga, one of the prescribed postures of meditation.
  • (FY) Asana, the third stage of Hatha Yoga; the posture for meditation.
  • (WG) Asana, a posture of a devotee, the manner of sitting forming part of the eight-fold observances of ascetic; one of the eight means or stages of Yoga.
  • (OG) Asana {Sans} A word derived from the verbal root as, signifying to sit quietly. Asana, therefore, technically signifies one of the peculiar postures adopted by Hindu ascetics, mostly of the hatha yoga school. Five of these postures are usually enumerated, but nearly ninety have been noted by students of the subject. A great deal of quasi-magical and mystical literature may be found devoted to these various postures and collateral topics, and their supposed or actual psychological value when assumed by devotees; but, as a matter of fact, a great deal of this writing is superficial and has very little indeed to do with the actual occult and esoteric training of genuine occultists. One is instinctively reminded of other quasi-mystical practices, as, for instance, certain genuflections or postures followed in the worship of the Christian Church, to which particular values are sometimes ascribed by fanatic devotees. Providing that the position of the body be comfortable so that the mind is least distracted, genuine meditation and spiritual and actual introspection can be readily and successfully attained by any earnest student without the slightest attention being paid to these various postures. A man sitting quietly in his armchair, or lying in his bed at night, or sitting or lying on the grass in a forest, can more readily enter the inner worlds than by adopting and following any one or more of these various asanas, which at the best are physiological aids of relatively small value.
  • (SKv) Asana, Pranayama Asana, meaning ‘posture,’ is derived from the verb root as — to sit. Asana refers to certain bodily positions taken by some Yogins during meditation. Prana-yama is ‘control of the breath’; a compound of prana — breath, and ayama — restraint. Pranayama refers to certain exercises in breathcontrol which tend to temporarily quiet the mind of the Yogin and thus bring about certain states of consciousness. These two physical practices of Asana and Pranayama are fraught with much danger to body, mind, and soul, unless undergone under the direction of a spiritual teacher who first insists on purity and virtue of heart and mind. These two practices are used mostly by Hatha-Yogins, and rarely by Yogins of the higher orders, such as Raja-Yogins and Brahma-Yogins. Hatha-Yoga, which develops the body and the lower psychic powers, begins with the lower parts of man’s nature, with those parts which are the results of the activity of the desire-mental parts or the Kama-Manasic principles of our being. Hence it is a very slow and often deceptive path, an inverse, indirect, and misleading method of developing the physical and certain psychic faculties. Hatha-Yoga alone will never develop spiritual powers. Raja-Yoga or Self-discipline begins with the training of oneself — the actor within who thinks and desires; it goes at once to the causes which make for general well-being, and hence has little use for Asana and Pranayama outside of the simple rules which we all know induce health.
  • (TG) Asat {Sans} . A philosophical term meaning non-being, or rather non-be-ness . The incomprehensible nothingness. Sat , the immutable, eternal, ever-present, and the one real Be-ness (not Being) is spoken of as being born of Asat , and Asat begotten by Sat: The unreal, or Prakriti, objective nature regarded as an illusion. Nature, or the illusive shadow of its one true essence.
  • (FY) Asat, the unreal, Prakriti.
  • (WG) Asat, non-being.
  • (OG) Asat — {Sans} A term meaning the unreal or the manifested universe; in contrast with sat, the real. In another and even more mystical sense, asat means even beyond or higher than sat, and therefore asat — not sat. In this significance, which is profoundly occult and deeply mystical, asat really signifies the unevolved or rather unmanifested nature of parabrahman — far higher than sat, which is the reality of manifested existence.
  • (GH) Asat Not-being, non-being: applied in Hindu philosophy to the manifested universe as being illusory, unreal, false, in contradistinction to Sat — Be-ness, Reality. In this sense Asat is Nature, or the illusive shadow of its one true essence. ( Theosophical Glossary, H. P. Blavatsky, p. 33) (Compound a, not; sat, being, be-ness. Bhagavad-Gita, W. Q. Judge, p. 119)
  • (TG) Asathor {Nors} . The same as Thor. The god of storms and thunder, a hero who receives Miolnir, the storm-hammer, from its fabricators, the dwarfs. With it he conquers Alwin in a battle of words; breaks the head of the giant Hrungir, chastises Loki for his magic; destroys the whole race of giants in Thrymheim; and, as a good and benevolent god, sets up therewith land-marks, sanctifies marriage bonds, blesses law and order, and produces every good and terrific feat with its help. A god in the Eddas, who is almost as great as Odin. (See Miolnir and Thor’s Hammer Asato {Sans} ma {Sans} sad {Sans} gamaya {Sans} Tamaso {Sans} jyotir {Sans} gamaya {Sans} Mrityor {Sans} mritam. {Sans}
  • (TG) Asava Samkhaya (Pali) . The finality of the stream, one of the six Abhijnas . A phenomenal knowledge of the finality of the stream of life and the series of re-births.
  • (TG) Asburj. One of the legendary peaks in the Teneriffe range. A great mountain in the traditions of Iran which corresponds in its allegorical meaning to the World-mountain, Meru. Asburj is that mount at the foot of which the sun sets.
  • (OG) Ascending Arc or Luminous Arc — This term, as employed in theosophical occultism, signifies the passage of the life-waves or life-streams of evolving mon ads upwards along, on, and through the globes of the chain of any celestial body, the earth’s chain included. Every celestial body (including the earth) is one member in a limited series or group of globes. These globes exist on different kosmic planes in a rising series. The life-waves or life-streams during any manvantara of such a chain circle or cycle around these globes in periodical surges or impulses. The ascent from the physical globe upwards is called the ascending arc; the descent through the more spiritual and ethereal globes downwards to the physical globe is called the descending arc. ( See also Planetary Chain)
  • (TG) Asch Metzareph {Hebr} . The Cleansing Fire, a Kabalistic treatise, treating of Alchemy and the relation between the metals and the planets. [W.W.W.]
  • (TG) Ases {Nors} . The creators of the Dwarfs and Elves, the Elementals below men, in the Norse lays. They are the progeny of Odin; the same as the Aesir .
  • (MO) Ase {Nors} (aw-seh) [ as topmost roof beam of a house] An active god.
  • (TG) Asgard {Nors} . The kingdom and the habitat of the Norse gods, the Scandinavian Olympus; situated higher than the Home of the Light-Elves, but on the same plane as Jotunheim, the home of the Jotuns, the wicked giants versed in magic, with whom the gods are at eternal war. It is evident that the gods of Asgard are the same as the Indian Suras (gods) and the Jotuns as the Asuras, both representing the conflicting powers of nature — beneficent and maleficent. They are the prototypes also of the Greek gods and the Titans.
  • (MO) Asgard {Nors} (aws-gawrd) [ as god + gard court] Home of the Aesir
  • (TG) Ash {Hebr} . Fire, whether physical or symbolical fire; also found written in English as As, Aish and Esch .
  • (FY) Ashab and Langhan, ceremonies for casting out evil spirits, so called among the Kolarian tribes.
  • (TG) Ashen and Langhan (Kolarian) . Certain ceremonies for casting out evil spirits, akin to those of exorcism with the Christians, in use with the Kolarian tribes in India.
  • (TG) Asherah {Hebr} . A word, which occurs in the Old Testament, and is commonly translated groves referring to idolatrous worship, but it is probable that it really referred to ceremonies of sexual depravity; it is a feminine noun. [W.W.W.]
  • (TG) Ashmog {avesta} . The Dragon or Serpent, a monster with a camel’s neck in the Avesta ; a kind of allegorical Satan, who after the Fall, lost its nature and its name. Called in the old Hebrew (Kabbalistic) texts the flying camel; evidently a reminiscence or tradition in both cases of the prehistoric or antediluvian monsters, half bird, half reptile.
  • (TG) Ashtadisa {Sans} . The eight-faced space. An imaginary division of space represented as an octagon and at other times as a dodecahedron .
  • (TG) Ashtar Vidya {Sans} . The most ancient of the Hindu works on Magic. Though there is a claim that the entire work is in the hands of some Occultists, yet the Orientalists deem it lost. A very few fragments of it are now extant, and even these are very much disfigured.
  • (TG) Ashta Siddhis {Sans} . The eight consummations in the practice of Hatha Yoga.
  • (FY) Ashta Siddhis, the eight consummations of Hatha Yoga.
  • (WG) Ashwattha, same as asvatha.
  • (TG) Ash Yggdrasil {Nors} . The Mundane Tree, the Symbol of the World with the old Norsemen, the tree of the universe, of time and of life. It is ever green, for the Norns of Fate sprinkle it daily with the water of life from the fountain of Urd, which flows in Midgard. The dragon Nidhogg gnaws its roots incessantly, the dragon of Evil and Sin; but the Ash Yggdrasil cannot wither, until the Last Battle (the Seventh Race in the Seventh Round) is fought, when life, time, and the world will all vanish and disappear.
  • (TG) Asiras {Sans} . Elementals without heads; lit., headless; used also of the first two human races.
  • (TG) Asita {Sans} . A proper name; a son of Bharata; a Rishi and a Sage.
  • (GH) Asita One of the Vedic Rishis, a descendant of Kasyapa, closely associated with Devala . ( Bhagavad-Gita, W. Q. Judge, p. 72)
  • (TG) Ask {Nors} or Ash tree. The tree of Knowledge. Together with the Embla (alder) the Ask was the tree from which the gods of Asgard created the first man.
  • (TG) Aski-kataski-haix-tetrax-damnameneus-aision. Darkness, Light, Earth, Sun, and Truth, were, says Hesychius, engraved upon the zone or belt of the Diana of Ephesus. Plutarch says that the priests used to recite these words over persons who were possessed by devils. [W.W.W.]
  • (MO) Askungen {Nors} (ask-ung-en) [ ask ash + unge child] Ash child, Cinderella
  • (MO) Asmegir {Nors} (aws-may-gir) [godmaker] Potential god: the human soul
  • (WG) Asmita, egoism.
  • (TG) Asmodeus. The Persian Aeshma-dev , the Esham-dev of the Parsis, the evil Spirit of Concupiscence, according to Breal, whom the Jews appropriated under the name of Ashmedai, the Destroyer, the Talmud identifying the creature with Beelzebub and Azrael (Angel of Death), and calling him the King of the Devils.
  • (TG) Asmoneans. Priest-kings of Israel whose dynasty reigned over the Jews for 126 years. They promulgated the Canon of the Mosaic Testament in contradistinction to the Apocrypha or Secret Books of the Alexandrian Jews, the Kabbalists, and maintained the dead-letter meaning of the former. Till the time of John Hyrcanus, they were Ascedeans (Chasidim) and Pharisees; but later they became Sadducees or Zadokites, asserters of Sacerdotal rule as contradistinguished from Rabbinical.
  • (TG) Asoka {Sans} . A celebrated Indian king of the Morya dynasty which reigned at Magadha. There were two Asokas in reality, according to the chronicles of Northern Buddhism, though the first Asoka — the grandfather of the second, named by Prof. Max Muller the Constantine of India, was better known by his name of Chandragupta. It is the former who was called, Piadasi (Pali) the beautiful, and Devanam-piya the beloved of the gods, and also Kalasoka ; while the name of his grandson was Dharmasoka — the Asoka of the good law — on account of his devotion to Buddhism. Moreover, according to the same source, the second Asoka had never followed the Brahmanical faith, but was a Buddhist born. It was his grandsire who had been first converted to the new faith, after which he had a number of edicts inscribed on pillars and rocks, a custom followed also by his grandson. But it was the second Asoka who was the most zealous supporter of Buddhism; he, who maintained in his palace from 60 to 70,000 monks and priests, who erected 84,000 topes and stupas throughout India, reigned 36 years, and sent missions to Ceylon, and throughout the world. The inscriptions of various edicts published by him display most noble ethical sentiments, especially the edict at Allahabad, on the so-called Asoka’s column, in the Fort. The sentiments are lofty and poetical, breathing tenderness for animals as well as men, and a lofty view of a king’s mission with regard to his people, that might be followed with great success in the present age of cruel wars and barbarous vivisection.
  • (FY) Asoka (King), a celebrated conqueror, monarch of a large portion of India, who is called the Constantine of Buddhism, temp. circa 250 B.C.
  • (TG) Asomatous {Greek} . Lit. , without a material body, incorporeal; used of celestial Beings and Angels.
  • (KT) Aspect. The form ( rupa ) under which any principle in septenary man or nature manifests is called an aspect of that principle in Theosophy.
  • (TG) Asrama {Sans} . A sacred building, a monastery or hermitage for ascetic purposes. Every sect in India has its Ashrams .
  • (OG) Asrama — {Sans} A word derived from the root sram, signifying to make efforts, to strive; with the particle a, which in this case gives force to the verbal root sram . Asrama has at least two main significations. The first is that of a college or school or a hermitage, an abode of ascetics, etc.; whereas the second meaning signifies a period of effort or striving in the religious life or career of a Brahmana of olden days. These periods of life in ancient times in Hindustan were four in number: the first, that of the student or brahmacharin; second, the period of life called that of the grihastha or householder — the period of married existence when the Brahmana took his due part in the affairs of men, etc.; third, the vanaprastha, or period of monastic seclusion, usually passed in a vana, or wood or forest, for purposes of inner recollection and spiritual meditation; and fourth, that of the bhikshu or religious mendicant, meaning one who has completely renounced the distractions of worldly life and has turned his attention wholly to spiritual affairs.
  • Brahmasrama. In modern esoteric or occult literature, the compound term Brahmasrama is occasionally used to signify an initiation chamber or secret room or adytum where the initiant or neophyte is striving or making efforts to attain union with Brahman or the inner god.
  • (SKf) Asrama, Brahmasrama An Asrama is a hermitage or sacred and secluded abode for ascetics and sages; derived from the verb-root asram — to counsel or consult in private or to commune with the Self within. Brahmasrama (a compound of Brahman — the Universal Divinity, and Asrama ) is a holy temple or an ‘Esoteric Seat’ or an ‘Initiation Chamber’ wherein the sacred mystery-truths are revealed.
  • (SP) Asrama — a hermitage, or one of the four stages of Hindu religious life.
  • (TG) Assassins. A masonic and mystic order founded by Hassan Sabah in Persia, in the eleventh century. The word is a European perversion of Hassan, which forms the chief part of the name. They were simply Sufis and addicted, according to the tradition, to hascheesh-eating , in order to bring about celestial visions. As shown by our late brother, Kenneth Mackenzie, they were teachers of the secret doctrines of Islamism; they encouraged mathematics and philosophy, and produced many valuable works. The chief of the Order was called Sheik-el-Jebel, translated the ‘Old Man of the Mountains’ , and, as their Grand Master, he possessed power of life and death.
  • (TG) Assorus {Chald} . The third group of progeny (Kissan and Assorus) from the Babylonian Duad, Tauthe and Apason, according to the Theogonies of Damascius. From this last emanated three others, of which series the last, Aus, begat Belus — the fabricator of the World, the Demiurgus.
  • (TG) Assur {Chald} . A city in Assyria; the ancient seat of a library from which George Smith excavated the earliest known tablets, to which he assigns a date about 1500 B.C., called Assur Kileh Shergat .
  • (TG) Assurbanipal {Chald} . The Sardanapalus of the Greeks, the greatest of the Assyrian Sovereigns, far more memorable on account of his magnificent patronage of learning than of the greatness of his empire, writes the late G. Smith, and adds: Assurbanipal added more to the Assyrian royal library than all the kings who had gone before him . As the distinguished Assyriologist tells us in another place of his Babylonian and Assyrian Literature (Chald. Account of Genesis) that the majority of the texts preserved belong to the earlier period previous to B.C. 1600, and yet asserts that it is to tablets written in his (Assurbanipal’s) reign (B.C. 673) that we owe almost all our knowledge of the Babylonian early history, one is well justified in asking, How do you know?
  • (TG) Assyrian Holy Scriptures . Orientalists show seven such books: the Books of Mamit, of Worship, of Interpretations, of Going to Hades; two Prayer Books ( Kanmagarri and Kanmikri : Talbot) and the Kantolite, the lost Assyrian Psalter.
  • (TG) Assyrian Tree of Life Asherah . It is translated in the Bible by grove and occurs 30 times. It is called an idol; and Maachah, the grandmother of Asa, King of Jerusalem, is accused of having made for herself such an idol, which was a lingham . For centuries this was a religious rite in Judaea. But the original Asherah was a pillar with seven branches on each side surmounted by a globular flower with three projecting rays, and no phallic stone, as the Jews made of it, but a metaphysical symbol. Merciful One, who dead to life raises! was the prayer uttered before the Asherah, on the banks of the Euphrates. The Merciful One, was neither the personal god of the Jews who brought the grove from their captivity, nor any extra-cosmic god, but the higher triad in man symbolized by the globular flower with its three rays.
  • (TG) Asta-dasha {Sans} . Perfect, Supreme Wisdom; a title of Deity.
  • (TG) Aster’t {Hebr} . Astarte, the Syrian goddess, the consort of Adon, or Adonai.
  • (SKf) Astika, Nastika An Astika in exoteric and orthodox Hindu religions is one who believes in the existence of an anthropomorphic god or gods, who require propitiation and worship. Astika is derived from the verb-form asti meaning ‘there exists’ or ‘there is’; in other words, ‘One or God exists.’ Nastika, a compound of na — astika or ‘not an Astika,’ is therefore one who does not believe in the orthodox God or Gods. Theosophists as well as Occultists of every religion are Nastikas in this sense. Though they do believe in greater beings than man in ever higher ranges, they do not make idols of them and endow them with power over man’s destiny, for a student of true religion knows too well that man is the builder of his own destiny.
  • (TG) Astraea {Greek} . The ancient goddess of justice, whom the wickedness of men drove away from earth to heaven, wherein she now dwells as the constellation Virgo.
  • (TG) Astral Body, or Astral Double . The ethereal counterpart or shadow of man or animal. The Linga Sharira , the Doppelganger. The reader must not confuse it with the ASTRAL SOUL, another name for the lower Manas, or Kama-Manas so-called, the reflection of the HIGHER EGO.
  • (KT) Astral Body. The ethereal counterpart or double of any physical body — Doppelganger.
  • (WG) Astral Body #6nn, a term very loosely used in Theosophical literature to cover every kind of phantasmal or ethereal appearance of the human form. Its principal meanings are as follows: The term is used as the English equivalent of the Sanskrit linga-sarira, and then means the ethereal or subtle form round which the physical body is built up, a form which serves as the vehicle of prana or life, and constitutes the mould into and from which the atoms of gross matter are continually passing. The linga-sarira or astral body in this sense can exude or ooze out from the physical body and become perceptible to the physical senses. This frequently occurs in the case of spiritualistic mediums, many of whose phenomena, especially the so-called materializations, are produced through the agency of this astral body. But the linga-sarira can never go far from the physical body and disintegrates, as a rule, shortly after the death of the latter. The term astral body is also used to mean the mayavi-rupa or thought-form, or illusionary form. As its name implies, the latter is a form or body created by the power of thought, and it is this mayavi-rupa which is seen in cases of the apparitions of living persons at a distance from the physical body. The term astral body is also sometimes used in regard to the kama-rupa or body of desires, which remains in the astral world after the death of the physical body, and the disintegration of the linga-sarira proper, when it slowly fades out as the energy that it has derived from the true ego, the manas-buddhi, is dissipated.
  • (OG) Astral Body — This is the popular term for the model-body, the linga-sarira. It is but slightly less material than is the physical body, and is in fact the model or framework around which the physical body is builded, and from which, in a sense, the physical body flows or develops as growth proceeds. It is the vehicle of prana or life-energy, and is, therefore, the container of all the energies descending from the higher parts of the human constitution by means of the pranic stream. The astral body precedes in time the physical body, and is the pattern around which the physical body is slavishly molded, atom by atom. In one sense the physical body may be called the deposit or dregs or lees of the astral body; the astral body likewise in its turn is but a deposit from the auric egg.
  • (TG) Astral Light The invisible region that surrounds our globe, as it does every other, and corresponding as the second Principle of Kosmos (the third being Life, of which it is the vehicle) to the Linga Sharira or the Astral Double in man. A subtle Essence visible only to a clairvoyant eye, and the lowest but one ( viz ., the earth), of the Seven Akasic or Kosmic Principles. Eliphas Levi calls it the great Serpent and the Dragon from which radiates on Humanity every evil influence. This is so; but why not add that the Astral Light gives out nothing but what it has received; that it is the great terrestrial crucible, in which the vile emanations of the earth (moral and physical) upon which the Astral Light is fed, are all converted into their subtlest essence, and radiated back intensified, thus becoming epidemics — moral, psychic and physical. Finally, the Astral Light is the same as the Sidereal Light of Paracelsus and other Hermetic philosophers. Physically, it is the ether of modern science. Metaphysically, and in its spiritual, or occult sense, ether is a great deal more than is often imagined. In occult physics, and alchemy, it is well demonstrated to enclose within its shoreless waves not only Mr. Tyndall’s ‘ promise and potency of every quality of life’, but also the realization of the potency of every quality of spirit. Alchemists and Hermetists believe that their astral, or sidereal ether, besides the above properties of sulphur, and white and red magnesia, or magnes , is the anima mundi, the workshop of Nature and of all the Kosmos, spiritually, as well as physically. The ‘grand magisterium’ asserts itself in the phenomenon of mesmerism, in the ‘levitation’ of human and inert objects; and may be called the ether from its spiritual aspect. The designation astral is ancient, and was used by some of the Neo-platonists, although it is claimed by some that the word was coined by the Martinists. Porphyry describes the celestial body which is always joined with the soul as ‘immortal, luminous, and star-like’. The root of this word may be found, perhaps, in the Scythic Aist-aer — which means star, or the Assyrian Istar, which, according to Burnouf has the same sense. (Isis Unveiled . )
  • (IU) Astral Light. — The same as the sidereal light of Paracelsus and other Hermetic philosophers. Physically, it is the ether of modern science. Metaphysically, and in its spiritual, or occult sense, ether is a great deal more than is often imagined. In occult physics, and alchemy, it is well demonstrated to enclose within its shoreless waves not only Mr. Tyndall’s promise and potency of every quality of life, but also the realization of the potency of every quality of spirit. Alchemists and Hermetists believe that their astral, or sidereal ether, besides the above properties of sulphur, and white and red magnesia, or magnes , is the anima mundi, the workshop of Nature and of all the cosmos, spiritually, as well as physically. The grand magisterium asserts itself in the phenomenon of mesmerism, in the levitation of human and inert objects; and may be called the ether from its spiritual aspect. The designation astral is ancient, and was used by some of the Neo-platonists. Porphyry describes the celestial body which is always joined with the soul as immortal, luminous, and star-like. The root of this word may be found, perhaps, in the Scythic aist-aer — which means star, or the Assyrian Ishtar, which, according to Burnouf has the same sense. As the Rosicrucians regarded the real, as the direct opposite of the apparent, and taught that what seems light to matter, is darkness to spirit , they searched for the latter in the astral ocean of invisible fire which encompasses the world; and claim to have traced the equally invisible divine spirit, which overshadows every man and is erroneously called soul, to the very throne of the Invisible and Unknown God. As the great cause must always remain invisible and imponderable, they could prove their assertions merely by demonstration of its effects in this world of matter, by calling them forth from the unknowable down into the knowable universe of effects. That this astral light permeates the whole cosmos, lurking in its latent state even in the minutest particle of rock, they demonstrate by the phenomenon of the spark from flint and from every other stone, whose spirit when forcibly disturbed springs to sight spark-like, and immediately disappears in the realms of the unknowable. Paracelsus named it the sidereal light, taking the term from the Latin. He regarded the starry host (our earth included) as the condensed portions of the astral light which fell down into generation and matter, but whose magnetic or spiritual emanations kept constantly a never-ceasing intercommunication between themselves and the parent-fount of all — the astral light. The stars attract from us to themselves, and we again from them to us, he says. The body is wood and the life is fire, which comes like the light from the stars and from heaven. Magic is the philosophy of alchemy, he says again. [De Ente Spirituali, lib. iv.; de Ente Astrorum, book. i.; and opera omnia, vol. i., pp. 634 and 699.] Everything pertaining to the spiritual world must come to us through the stars, and if we are in friendship with them, we may attain the greatest magical effects. As fire passes through an iron stove, so do the stars pass through man with all their properties and go into him as the rain into the earth, which gives fruit out of that same rain. Now observe that the stars surround the whole earth, as a shell does the egg ; through the shell comes the air, and penetrates to the centre of the world. The human body is subjected as well as the earth, and planets, and stars, to a double law; it attracts and repels, for it is saturated through with double magnetism, the influx of the astral light. Everything is double in nature; magnetism is positive and negative, active and passive, male and female. Night rests humanity from the day’s activity, and restores the equilibrium of human as well as of cosmic nature. When the mesmerizer will have learned the grand secret of polarizing the action and endowing his fluid with a bisexual force he will have become the greatest magician living. Thus the astral light is androgyne, for equilibrium is the resultant of two opposing forces eternally reacting upon each other. The result of this is LIFE. When the two forces are expanded and remain so long inactive, as to equal one another and so come to a complete rest, the condition is DEATH. A human being can blow either cold or hot air. Every child knows how to regulate the temperature of his breath; but how to protect one’s self from either hot or cold air, no physiologist has yet learned with certainty. The astral light alone, as the chief agent in magic, can discover to us all secrets of nature. The astral light is identical with the Hindu akasa, a word which we will now explain. [[See akasa.]]
  • (FY) Astral Light, subtle form of existence forming the basis of our material universe.
  • (WG) Astral Light #6nn, the light derived from the stars; the lowest principle of akasa. This term has been so indiscriminately used as to be now synonymous with akasa and ether. Although called light, it is such as can only be perceived psychically. A tenuous medium, or ether, interpenetrating all space, and which cannot be properly understood unless the doctrine is fully admitted that the apparently solid world and material objects are all illusions or space made visible
  • (OG) Astral Light — The astral light corresponds in the case of our globe, and analogically in the case of our solar system, to what the linga-sarira is in the case of an individual man. Just as in man the linga-sarira or astral body is the vehicle or carrier of prana or life-energy, so is the astral light the carrier of the cosmic jiva or cosmic life-energy. To us humans it is an invisible region surrounding our earth, as H. P. Blavatsky expresses it, as indeed it surrounds every other physical globe; and among the seven kosmic principles it is the most material excepting one, our physical universe. The astral light therefore is, on the one hand, the storehouse or repository of all the energies of the kosmos on their way downwards to manifest in the material spheres — of our solar system in general as well as of our globe in particular; and, on the other hand, it is the receptacle or magazine of whatever passes out of the physical sphere on its upward way. Thirdly, it is a kosmic picture-gallery or indelible record of whatever takes place on the astral and physical planes; however, this last phase of the functions of the astral light is the least in importance and real interest. The astral light of our own globe, and analogically of any other physical globe, is the region of the kama-loka, at least as concerns the intermediate and lower parts of the kama-loka; and all entities that die pass through the astral light on their way upwards, and in the astral light throw off or shed the kama-rupa at the time of the second death. The solar system has its own astral light in general, just as every globe in the universal solar system has its astral light in particular, in each of these last cases being a thickening or materializing or concreting around the globe of the general astral substance forming the astral light of the solar system. The astral light, strictly speaking, is simply the lees or dregs of akasa and exists in steps or stages of increasing ethereality. The more closely it surrounds any globe, the grosser and more material it is. It is the receptacle of all the vile and horrible emanations from earth and earth beings, and is therefore in parts filled with earthly pollutions. There is a constant interchange, unceasing throughout the solar manvantara, between the astral light on the one hand, and our globe earth on the other, each giving and returning to the other. Finally, the astral light is with regard to the material realms of the solar system the copy or reflection of what the akasa is in the spiritual realms. The astral light is the mother of the physical, just as the spirit is the mother of the akasa; or, inversely, the physical is merely the concretion of the astral, just as the akasa is the veil or concretion of the highest spiritual. Indeed, the astral and physical are one, just as the akasic and the spiritual are one.
  • (VS) In it [[the Astral region]] thy Soul will find the blossoms of life, but under every flower a serpent coiled (I 18) [[p. 6]] The astral region, the Psychic World of supersensuous perceptions and of deceptive sights the world of Mediums. It is the great Astral Serpent of Eliphas Levi. No blossom plucked in those regions has ever yet been brought down on earth without its serpent coiled around the stem. It is the world of the Great Illusion .
  • (TG) Astrolatry {Greek} . Worship of the Stars.
  • (TG) Astrology {Greek} . The Science which defines the action of celestial bodies upon mundane affairs, and claims to foretell future events from the position of the stars. Its antiquity is such as to place it among the very earliest records of human learning. It remained for long ages a secret science in the East, and its final expression remains so to this day, its exoteric application having been brought to any degree of perfection in the West only during the period of time since Varaha Muhira wrote his book on Astrology some 1400 years ago. Claudius Ptolemy, the famous geographer and mathematician, wrote his treatise Tetrabiblos about 135 A.D., which is still the basis of modern astrology. The science of Horoscopy is studied now chiefly under four heads: viz ., (1) Mundane, in its application to meteorology, seismology, husbandry, etc. (2) State or civic , in regard to the fate of nations, kings and rulers. (3) Horary , in reference to the solving of doubts arising in the mind upon any subject. (4) Genethliacal, in its application to the fate of individuals from the moment of their birth to their death. The Egyptians and the Chaldees were among the most ancient votaries of Astrology, though their modes of reading the stars and the modern practices differ considerably. The former claimed that Belus, the Bel or Elu of the Chaldees, a scion of the divine Dynasty, or the Dynasty of the king-gods, had belonged to the land of Chemi, and had left it, to found a colony from Egypt on the banks of the Euphrates, where a temple ministered by priests in the service of the lords of the stars was built, the said priests adopting the name of Chaldees . Two things are known: (a) that Thebes (in Egypt) claimed the honour of the invention of Astrology; and (b) that it was the Chaldees who taught that science to the other nations. Now Thebes antedated considerably not only Ur of the Chaldees, but also Nipur, where Bel was first worshipped — Sin, his son (the moon), being the presiding deity of Ur, the land of the nativity of Terah, the Sabean and Astrolater, and of Abram, his son, the great Astrologer of biblical tradition. All tends, therefore, to corroborate the Egyptian claim. If later on the name of Astrologer fell into disrepute in Rome and elsewhere, it was owing to the fraud of those who wanted to make money by means of that which was part and parcel of the sacred Science of the Mysteries, and, ignorant of the latter, evolved a system based entirely upon mathematics, instead of on transcendental metaphysics and having the physical celestial bodies as its upadhi or material basis. Yet, all persecutions notwithstanding, the number of the adherents of Astrology among the most intellectual and scientific minds was always very great. If Cardan and Kepler were among its ardent supporters, then its later votaries have nothing to blush for, even in its now imperfect and distorted form. As said in Isis Unveiled (I. 259): Astrology is to exact astronomy what psychology is to exact physiology. In astrology and psychology one has to step beyond the visible world of matter, and enter into the domain of transcendent spirit. (See Astronomos
  • (KT) Astrology. The science which defines the action of celestial bodies upon mundane affairs, and claims to foretell future events from the positions of the stars. Its antiquity is such as to place it among the very earliest records of human learning. It remained for long ages a secret science in the East, and its final expression remains so to this day, its esoteric application only having been brought to any degree of perfection in the West during the lapse of time since Varaha Mihira wrote his book on Astrology, some 1400 years ago. Claudius Ptolemy, the famous geographer and mathematician who founded the system of Astronomy known under his name, wrote his Tetrabiblos, which is still the basis of modern Astrology, 135 A.D. The science of Horoscopy is studied now chiefly under four heads, viz.: (1). Mundane, in its application to meteorology, seismology, husbandry. (2). State or Civic, in regard to the future of nations, Kings, and rulers. (3). Horary, in reference to the solving of doubts arising in the mind upon any subject. (4). Genethliacal, in connection with the future of individuals from birth unto death. The Egyptians and the Chaldees were among the most ancient votaries of Astrology, though their modes of reading the stars and the modern methods differ considerably. The former claimed that Belus, the Bel or Elu of the Chaldees, a scion of the Divine Dynasty, or the dynasty of the King-gods, had belonged to the land of Chemi, and had left it to found a colony from Egypt on the banks of the Euphrates, where a temple, ministered by priests in the service of the lords of the stars, was built. As to the origin of the science, it is known on the one hand that Thebes claimed the honour of the invention of Astrology; whereas, on the other hand, all are agreed that it was the Chaldees who taught that science to the other nations. Now Thebes antedated considerably, not only Ur of the Chaldees, but also Nipur, where Bel was first worshipped — Sin, his son (the moon), being the presiding deity of Ur, the land of the nativity of Terah, the Sabean and Astrolater, and of Abram, his son, the great Astrologer of Biblical tradition. All tends, therefore, to corroborate the Egyptian claim. If later on the name of Astrologer fell into disrepute in Rome and elsewhere, it was owing to the frauds of those who wanted to make money of that which was part and parcel of the Sacred Science of the Mysteries, and who, ignorant of the latter, evolved a system based entirely on mathematics, instead of transcendental metaphysics with the physical celestial bodies as its upadhi or material basis. Yet, all persecutions notwithstanding, the number of adherents to Astrology among the most intellectual and scientific minds was always very great. If Cardan and Kepler were among its ardent supporters, then later votaries have nothing to blush for, even in its now imperfect and distorted form. As said in Isis Unveiled (I., 259), Astrology is to exact astronomy, what psychology is to exact physiology. In astrology and psychology one has to step beyond the visible world of matter and enter into the domain of transcendent spirit.
  • (OG) Astrology — The astrology of the ancients was indeed a great and noble science. It is a term which means the science of the celestial bodies. Modern astrology is but the tattered and rejected outer coating of real, ancient astrology; for that truly sublime science was the doctrine of the origin, of the nature, of the being, and of the destiny of the solar bodies, of the planetary bodies, and of the beings who dwell on them. It also taught the science of the relations of the parts of kosmic nature among themselves, and more particularly as applied to man and his destiny as forecast by the celestial orbs. From that great and noble science sprang up an exoteric pseudo-science, derived from the Mediterranean and Asian practice, eventuating in the modern scheme called astrology — a tattered remnant of ancient wisdom. In actual fact, genuine archaic astrology was one of the branches of the ancient Mysteries, and was studied to perfection in the ancient Mystery schools. It had throughout all ancient time the unqualified approval and devotion of the noblest men and of the greatest sages. Instead of limiting itself as modern so-called astrology does to a system based practically entirely upon certain branches of mathematics, in archaic days the main body of doctrine which astrology then contained was transcendental metaphysics, dealing with the greatest and most abstruse problems concerning the universe and man. The celestial bodies of the physical universe were considered in the archaic astrology to be not merely time markers, or to have vague relations of a psychomagnetic quality as among themselves — although indeed this is true — but to be the vehicles of starry spirits, bright and living gods, whose very existence and characteristics, individually as well as collectively, made them the governors and expositors of destiny.
  • (TG) Astronomos {Greek} . The title given to the Initiate in the Seventh Degree of the reception of the Mysteries. In days of old, Astronomy was synonymous with Astrology; and the great Astrological Initiation took place in Egypt at Thebes, where the priests perfected, if they did not wholly invent the science. Having passed through the degrees of Pastophoros, Neocoros, Melanophoros, Kistophoros, and Balahala (the degree of Chemistry of the Stars), the neophyte was taught the mystic signs of the Zodiac, in a circle dance representing the course of the planets (the dance of Krishna and the Gopis, celebrated to this day in Rajputana); after which he received a cross, the Tau (or Tat), becoming an Astronomos and a Healer. (See Isis Unveiled . Vol. II. 365) Astronomy and Chemistry were inseparable in these studies. Hippocrates had so lively a faith in the influence of the stars on animated beings, and on their diseases, that he expressly recommends not to trust to physicians who are ignorant of astronomy. Unfortunately the key to the final door of Astrology or Astronomy is lost by the modern Astrologer; and without it, how can he ever be able to answer the pertinent remark made by the author of Mazzaroth, who writes: people are said to be born under one sign, while in reality they are born under another, because the sun is now seen among different stars in the equinox? Nevertheless, even the few truths he does know brought to his science such eminent and scientific believers as Sir Isaac Newton, Bishops Jeremy and Hall, Archbishop Usher, Dryden, Flamstead, Ashmole, John Rilton, Steele, and a host of noted Rosicrucians.
  • (WG) Asu, vital spirit, vigorous life; the breath; spiritual life.
  • (TG) Asuramaya {Sans} . Known also as Mayasura . An Atlantean astronomer, considered as a great magician and sorcerer, well-known in Sanskrit works.
  • (FY) Asuramaya, an Atlantean astronomer, well known in Sanskrit writings.
  • (WG) Asura-maya, name of a great Atlantean magician, who is said to have been a great astronomer.
  • (TG) Asura Mazda {Sans} . In the Zend, Ahura Mazda . The same as Ormuzd or Mazdeo; the god of Zoroaster and the Parsis.
  • (TG) Asuras {Sans} . Exoterically, elementals and evil gods — considered maleficent; demons, and no gods. But esoterically — the reverse. For in the most ancient portions of the Rig Veda , the term is used for the Supreme Spirit, and therefore the Asuras are spiritual and divine. It is only in the last book of the Rig Veda, its latest part, and in the Atharva Veda , and the Brahmans, that the epithet, which had been given to Agni, the greatest Vedic Deity, to Indra and Varuna, has come to signify the reverse of gods. Asu means breath, and it is with his breath that Prajapati (Brahma) creates the Asuras. When ritualism and dogma got the better of the Wisdom religion, the initial letter a was adopted as a negative prefix, and the term ended by signifying not a god, and Sura only a deity. But in the Vedas the Suras have ever been connected with Surya, the sun, and regarded as inferior deities, devas.
  • (FY) Asuras, a class of elementals considered maleficent; demons.
  • (WG) Asura, a spiritual, divine being; (derived from asu, breath;) an evil spirit, a demon of the highest order in perpetual hostility with the gods; (incorrectly derived from a, not, and sura , god: a non-god, a demon
  • (GH) Asura Originally the word stood for the supreme spirit (being so used in the Rig-Veda), and equivalent to the Zoroastrian Ahura Mazda; then it became applied to deities, such as Indra, Agni and Varuna; later still it denoted a class of elemental beings evil in nature, and consequently Asuras are termed demons. The Taittiriya-Brahmana represents the Asuras as being created from the breath of Brahma-Prajapati likewise the Laws of Manu, but the Puranas indicate that they sprang from his thigh. Esoterically, the Asuras, transformed subsequently into evil Spirits and lower gods, who are eternally at war with the great deities — are the gods of the Secret Wisdom. . . . They are the sons of the primeval Creative Breath at the beginning of every new Mahakalpa, or Manvantara; . . . Evidently they have been degraded in Space and Time into opposing powers or demons by the ceremonialists, ( Secret Doctrine, II, pp. 500-1). (The following word is derived from the verbal root:) as, to breathe. Bhagavad-Gita, W. Q. Judge, p. 65)
  • (SKv) Asura Asura has two renderings: an ancient and esoteric one, and a later and exoteric one. The oldest meaning of Asura as used in the Rig-Veda is ‘a divine spirit,’ derived from asu — breath. The word Asura was also applied to those classes of beings now spoken of as Kumaras, Agnishwattas, and Manasaputras, those fallen angels, the fathers of our higher natures, who thus imbodied themselves in order to attain greater wisdom and a fuller awareness of their divine natures. Later when the keys to the mystery-teachings were lost and theological dogma arose among the Brahmanical sects, the Asuras, within or without man, who opposed the empty ritualism and sacrificial ceremonial of the time, were then called ‘elemental-gods’ or ‘demons’ by these followers of false gods and of exoteric form, and the derivation of the word was changed to a — not, and sura — god; and hence Asura soon became synonymous with ‘demon,’ and in most of the later literature of India Asuras are ‘demons,’ those who oppose the works of the gods.
  • (IN) Asura(s) {Sans} A not-god in post-Vedic period, demons or evil spirits hostile to the suras (gods); in the most ancient portions of the Rig Veda , divine beings, supreme spirit (possibly fr asu , breath); in theosophy, intellectual deities.
  • (TG) Aswamedha {Sans} . The Horse-sacrifice; an ancient Brahmanical ceremony.
  • (WG) Asvamedha, the horse-sacrifice, a ceremony of Vedic times.
  • (TG) Aswattha {Sans} . The Bo-tree , the tree of knowledge, ficus religiosa .
  • (WG) Asvatha, the holy fig tree, symbolizing the universe.
  • (GH) Asvattha The pippala, the sacred Indian fig-tree, ficus religiosa. In Buddhism called the Bodhi-tree — the tree under which the Buddha received full illumination. Mystically, the ‘Tree of Life,’ the great World Tree, symbolic both of the vital structure of the universe and of the cosmic hierarchies in all their various interrelations. The roots of the Asvattha represent the Supreme Being, or First Cause, the Logos; but one has to go beyond those roots to unite oneself with Krishna, . . . Its boughs are . . . the highest Dhyan Chohans or Devas. The Vedas are its leaves. He only who goes beyond the roots shall never return, i.e., shall reincarnate no more during this ‘age’ of Brahma. ( Secret Doctrine, (See Bhagavad-Gita (Meaning of the word itself: ‘under which horses stand asva, a horse; ttha from stha, to stand. Bhagavad-Gita
  • (OG) Asvattha @1179 The mystical tree of knowledge, the mystical tree of kosmical life and being, represented as growing in a reversed position: the branches extending downwards and the roots upwards. The branches typify the visible kosmical universe, the roots the invisible world of spirit. The universe among the ancients of many nations was portrayed or figurated under the symbol of a tree, of which the roots sprang from the divine heart of things, and the trunk and the branches and the branchlets and the leaves were the various planes and worlds and spheres of the kosmos. The fruit of this kosmic tree contained the seeds of future trees, being the entities which had attained through evolution the end of their evolutionary journey, such as men and the gods — themselves universes in the small, and destined in the future to become kosmic entities when the cycling wheel of time shall have turned through long aeons on its majestic round. In fact, every living thing, and so-called inanimate things also, are trees of life, with their roots above in the spiritual realms, with their trunks passing through the intermediate spheres, and their branches manifesting in the physical realms.
  • (SKs) Aswattha The Mystic Tree of Life, described in Hindu writings as the symbol of life and its illusive joys and pleasures. It is described by them as growing in a reversed position, the branches extending downward and the roots upward; the former typifying the external world of sense, i.e., the visible cosmical universe, and the latter the invisible world of spirit, because the roots have their genesis in the heavenly regions where, from the world’s creation, humanity has placed its invisible deity. — Isis Unveiled, I, 153
  • (IN) order to attain immortality, and thus free oneself from the endless rounds of life and death on this planet, one must destroy this tree of illusion with the ‘Sword of Knowledge.’ One must go beyond those roots to unite oneself with Krishna . . . the indestructible. . . ( op cit., I, 406) It was under this Aswattha tree, sometimes called the Bodhi-tree, that the Buddha conquered illusion. He delved within, and passing beyond the roots of the tree, attained enlightenment and visioned Reality.
  • (SP) Asvattha [aswattha] — the sacred fig tree. Symbolically, the Tree of Life.
  • (GH) Asvatthaman The son of Drona and Kripa (sister of Kripa, q.v. ): one of the generals in the army of the Kauravas. He was one of the three surviving warriors at the end of the war, and was then made commander. ( Bhagavad-Gita , W. Q. Judge, p. 3)
  • (GH) Asvins (or more correctly Asvinau, the word itself meaning ‘the two horsemen’). Two Vedic deities represented as twin horsemen, harbingers of Ushas, the dawn. They appear in the sky in a chariot drawn by golden horses, or again by birds. Their attributes pertain to youth and beauty. They are regarded as the physicians of the gods, and avert from mankind sickness and misfortune; hence many Vedic hymns are addressed to them. Yaska, the celebrated commentator of the Vedas, referring to the ‘twin horsemen’ as precursors of light and the dawn, held that they represent the transition from darkness to light, and the intermingling of both produces that inseparable duality which is expressed by the twin nature of the Asvinau. H. P. Blavatsky remarks: . . . these twins are, in the esoteric philosophy, the Kumara-Egos, the reincarnating ‘Principles’ in this Manvantara. ( Theosophical Glossary, H. P. Blavatsky, p. 41) ( Bhagavad-Gita , W. Q. Judge, p. 78)
  • (FY) Aswini, the divine charioteers; mystically they correspond to Hermes, who is looked upon as his equal. They represent the internal organ by which knowledge is conveyed from the soul to the body.
  • (TG) Aswins {Sans}, or Aswinau , dual; or again, Aswini-Kumarau, are the most mysterious and occult deities of all; who have puzzled the oldest commentators. Literally, they are the Horsemen, the divine charioteers, as they ride in a golden car drawn by horses or birds or animals, and are possessed of many forms . They are two Vedic deities, the twin sons of the sun and the sky, which becomes the nymph Aswini. In mythological symbolism they are the bright harbingers of Ushas, the dawn, who are ever young and handsome, bright, agile, swift as falcons, who prepare the way for the brilliant dawn to those who have patiently awaited through the night. They are also called the physicians of Swarga (or Devachan), inasmuch as they heal every pain and suffering, and cure all diseases. Astronomically, they are asterisms. They were enthusiastically worshipped, as their epithets show. They are the Ocean-born ( i.e ., space born) or Abdhijau, crowned with lotuses or Pushkara-srajam, etc., etc. Yaska, the commentator in the Nirukta, thinks that the Aswins represent the transition from darkness to light — cosmically, and we may add, metaphysically, also. But Muir and Goldstucker are inclined to see in them ancient horsemen of great renown, because, forsooth, of the legend that the gods refused the Aswins admittance to a sacrifice on the ground that they had been on too familiar terms with men . Just so, because as explained by the same Yaska they are identified with heaven and earth, only for quite a different reason. Truly they are like the Ribhus, originally renowned mortals (but also non-renowned occasionally) who in the course of time are translated into the companionship of gods; and they show a negative character, the result of the alliance of light with darkness, simply because these twins are, in the esoteric philosophy, the Kumara-Egos , the reincarnating Principles in this Manvantara.
  • (MO) Asynja {Nors} (aw-sin-ya) [goddess, f. of Ase] Active deity
  • (MO) Asynjor {Nors} (aw-sin-yore) [pl. of Asynja, f. of Aesir] Goddesses
  • (TG) Atala {Sans} . One of the regions in the Hindu lokas, and one of the seven mountains; but esoterically Atala is on an astral plane, and was, once on a time, a real island upon this earth.
  • (TG) Atalanta Fugiens {Latin} . A famous treatise by the eminent Rosicrucian Michael Maier; it has many beautiful engravings of Alchemic symbolism: here is to be found the original of the picture of a man and woman within a circle, a triangle around it, then a square: the inscription is, From the first ens proceed two contraries, thence come the three principles, and from them the four elementary states; if you separate the pure from the impure you will have the stone of the Philosophers.
  • (TG) Atarpi {Chald}, or Atarpi-nisi , the man. A personage who was pious to the gods; and who prayed the god Hea to remove the evil of drought and other things before the Deluge is sent. The story is found on one of the most ancient Babylonian tablets, and relates to the sin of the world. In the words of G. Smith the god Elu or Bel calls together an assembly of the gods, his sons, and relates to them that he is angry at the sin of the world; and in the fragmentary phrases of the tablet: . . . . I made them . . . . Their wickedness I am angry at, their punishment shall not be small . . . . let food be exhausted, above let Vul drink up his rain, etc., etc. In answer to Atarpi’s prayer the god Hea announces his resolve to destroy the people he created, which he does finally by a deluge.
  • (TG) Atash Behram {avesta} . The sacred fire of the Parsis, preserved perpetually in their fire-temples.
  • (TG) Atef {Egyp} or Crown of Horus. It consisted of a tall white cap with ram’s horns, and the uraeus in front. Its two feathers represent the two truths — life and death .
  • (TG) Athamaz {Hebr} . The same as Adonis with the Greeks, the Jews having borrowed all their gods.
  • (TG) Athanor astral fluid of the Alchemists, their Archimedean lever; exoterically, the furnace of the Alchemist.
  • (TG) Atharva Veda {Sans} . The fourth Veda; lit., magic incantation containing aphorisms, incantations and magic formulae. One of the most ancient and revered Books of the Brahmans.
  • (FY) Atharva Veda, one of the four most ancient and revered books of the ancient Brahmans.
  • (WG) Atharva-veda, the fourth of the Vedas.
  • (TG) Athenagoras {Greek} . A Platonic philosopher of Athens, who wrote a Greek Apology for the Christians in A.D. 177, addressed to the Emperor Marcus Aurelius, to prove that the accusations brought against them, namely that they were incestuous and ate murdered children, were untrue.
  • (KT) Athenagoras. A Platonic Philosopher of Athens, who wrote an apology for the Christians in 177 A. D., addressed to Marcus Aurelius, to prove that the accusations brought against them, viz., that they were incestuous and ate murdered children, were untrue.
  • (TG) Athor {Egyp} . Mother Night. Primeval Chaos, in the Egyptian cosmogony. The goddess of night.
  • (TG) Ativahikas {Sans} . With the Visishtadwaitees, these are the Pitris, or Devas , who help the disembodied soul or Jiva in its transit from its dead body to Paramapadha .
  • (TG) Atlantidae {Greek} . The ancestors of the Pharaohs and the forefathers of the Egyptians, according to some, and as the Esoteric Science teaches. (See Sec. Doct ., Vol. II., and Esoteric Buddhism Plato heard of this highly civilized people, the last remnant of which was submerged 9,000 years before his day, from Solon, who had it from the High Priests of Egypt. Voltaire, the eternal scoffer, was right in stating that the Atlantidae (our fourth Root Race) made their appearance in Egypt. . . . . It was in Syria and in Phrygia, as well as Egypt, that they established the worship of the Sun. Occult philosophy teaches that the Egyptians were a remnant of the last Aryan Atlantidae.
  • (TG) Atlantis {Greek} . The continent that was submerged in the Atlantic and the Pacific Oceans according to the secret teachings and Plato.
  • (FY) Atlantis, the continent that was submerged in the Southern and Pacific Oceans.
  • (WG) Atlantis, a former continent which was submerged long ago during the cataclysms which overtook other races. A part of it was on the Atlantic floor, and hence the name of that ocean as well as Mount Atlas. But it included much more, and probably the Americas among other lands.
  • (TG) Atma (or Atman ) {Sans} . The Universal Spirit, the divine Monad, the 7th Principle, so-called, in the septenary constitution of man. The Supreme Soul.
  • (KT) Atman, or Atma {Sans} The Universal Spirit, the divine monad, the seventh Principle, so called, in the exoteric septenary classification of man. The Supreme Soul.
  • (FY) Atma, the spirit; the divine monad; the seventh principle of the septenary human constitution.
  • (WG) Atma, the spirit of the universe; spirit; soul; the animating spiritual breath; the permanent Self; the highest principle of life in the universe; in one sense Brahma, the supreme deity and soul of the universe.
  • (WG) Atman, the same as Atma , which see.
  • (OG) Atman — {Sans} The root of atman is hardly known; its origin is uncertain, but the general meaning is that of self. The highest part of man — self, pure consciousness per se. The essential and radical power or faculty in man which gives to him, and indeed to every other entity or thing, its knowledge or sentient consciousness of selfhood. This is not the ego. This principle (atman) is a universal one; but during incarnations its lowest parts take on attributes, because it is linked with the buddhi, as the buddhi is linked with the manas, as the manas is linked to the kama, and so on down the scale. Atman is also sometimes used of the universal self or spirit which is called in the Sanskrit writings Brahman (neuter), and the Brahman or universal spirit is also called the paramatman. Man is rooted in the kosmos surrounding him by three principles, which can hardly be said to be above the first or atman, but are, so to say, that same atman’s highest and most glorious parts. The inmost link with the Unutterable was called in ancient India by the term self, which has often been mistranslated soul. The Sanskrit word is atman and applies, in psychology, to the human entity. The upper end of the link, so to speak, was called paramatman, or the self beyond, i.e., the permanent SELF — words which describe neatly and clearly to those who have studied this wonderful philosophy, somewhat of the nature and essence of the being which man is, and the source from which, in beginningless and endless duration, he sprang. Child of earth and child of heaven, he contains both in himself. We say that the atman is universal, and so it is. It is the universal selfhood, that feeling or consciousness of selfhood which is the same in every human being, and even in all the inferior beings of the hierarchy, even in those of the beast kingdom under us, and dimly perceptible in the plant world, and which is latent even in the minerals. This is the pure cognition, the abstract idea, of self. It differs not at all throughout the hierarchy, except in degree of self-recognition. Though universal, it belongs (so far as we are concerned in our present stage of evolution) to the fourth kosmic plane, though it is our seventh principle counting upwards.
  • (SK)o Atman The SELF; the Divinity or Highest Principle of man; pure consciousness. Atman is that universal SELF of man which is the same in every living being and which links each and all with Brahman, the SELF of the Universe. The root of the word Atman is uncertain, but it is very likely from a verb-root meaning ‘to breathe.’ WW Atman [A] Sanskrit word which means nothing but the Self; but upon a proper understanding of this word hinges a proper conception of Hindu philosophy. It is the keyword of all, or nearly all, the oriental philosophies. There are six of these: the Shad – darsana, from shash , six, and darsana, from the root dris , to look at, to see, hence those six things (or systems) which are ‘seen’ or studied. They regard a system of philosophy as that which the inner eye sees. What sees it, finally, what is the inner eye? The Atman, principally and first of all the Self. You have often heard the phrase in Patanjali, The universe exists for the purpose of the Soul That can mean: The Self exists for the purpose of the universe. Now this word Atman is sometimes translated soul . It is a mistake. There are other words used for Soul, but Atman is the root-self, the Spirit. The difference between spirit and souls may be likened to a sun and the rays of the sun. Thus, Atman is the source and center of consciousness; in each of us a Sun [[Symbol of a circle with one dot at the center]]. This is the Atman, and these are the rays without number. Light may be conceived as proceeding from the sun as a flood. We may also conceive it as in rays, which is the usual way, and it is as rays that the ancient philosophers seem to have preferred to consider it. You will find it in the old Egyptian paintings and carvings, where you sometimes will also see a sun with its rays, each ray ending in a hand. But now each ray may be considered as a soul. The soul, psychologically speaking, is that aspect of the human individuality which incarnates. Atman does not incarnate. There is no need for Atman to incarnate; it does not learn, it has no need to learn. Mind you, I speak of our own universe. In other universes Atman may be but a soul to a higher Atman, and Atman the Self may be as it were lower than a soul; it may be but an atom, insignificant; but that is beyond us now. When questioned on this point the Lord Buddha is said to have kept silence, not because he did not know, but because he did not think it necessary to touch upon it, because it is beyond our power to properly conceive it. It is because the Christians overestimated their faculties in the pride of their hearts and dragged down this glorious conception of the divine sun in man, that they made of their God one thing, of their church another, and of their Jesus a third, separate, yet united to the first. A mystery to them, explainable only by Theosophy. Consider the sun Atman, each ray a soul. As the soul passes through matter it reaches the earth, and as it goes through the spiritual and psychic atmosphere it loses a large part of its divine glory, of its illuminating power; not that it loses in itself its faculty of light, but the deeper it sinks into matter it loses more and more of its individuality, it falls asleep, because weaker, spiritually flaccid. Now Atman is immortal, boundless, beyond knowledge, possessing all things, instant in its action. The soul is not. If the soul can struggle through life’s shadow by gathering itself into itself — to use a beautiful figure in the Hebrew Bible, as a mother will gather her little child in her arms — in the same way the diviner part will gather the lower part into Itself. How is this done? Through struggle, through suffering, age after age, through different deaths; and as the soul gathers itself it gets a little higher, if there is no falling back, until finally it proceeds in glory and reaches its Atman, itself, its god, and god within. I and my Father are one, said Jesus, I was the soul struggling below; the Father was the Atman, the self.
  • (IN) Atman {Sans} Self, universal spirit, the highest consciousness in all entities, including man.
  • (SP) Atman — soul or self jivatman — the living or individual self paramatman — the supreme or universal self sutratman — the thread self of individuality in successive incarnations. LINGA-SARIRA, STHULA-SARIRA, PLANES
  • (TG) Atma-bhu {Sans} . Soul-existence, or existing as soul
  • (TG) Atmabodha {Sans} Self-knowledge; the title of a Vedantic treatise by Sankaracharya.
  • (FY) Atmabodha ( Lit. self-knowledge the title of a Vedantic treatise by Sankara-charya.
  • (TG) Atma-jnani {Sans} . The Knower of the World-Soul, or Soul in general.
  • (SKv) Atma-jnanin, Tattva-jnanin Atma-jnanin is ‘the Divine Self-knower’; a com pound of Atman , the divinity of man, and jnanin , the knower, from the verb-root jna — to know. One who has realized or met face to face the Divinity within him is an Atma-jnanin. Tattva-jnanin is one who knows and understands the abstract cosmic essences or principles from which all in this Universe spring. Tattva literally means the ‘that-ness’ of a thing, from tat — that, and tva, a noun suffix.
  • (TG) Atma-matrasu {Sans} . To enter into the elements of the One-Self (See Sec. Atmamatra is the spiritual atom, as contrasted with, and opposed to, the elementary differentiated atom or molecule.
  • (FY) Atman
  • (TG) Atma Vidya {Sans} . The highest form of spiritual knowledge Soul-knowledge.
  • (WG) Atma-vidya, knowledge of soul or the Supreme Spirit.
  • (OG) Atom — This word comes to us from the ancient Greek philosophers Democritus, Leucippus, and Epicurus, and the hundreds of great men who followed their lead in this respect and who were therefore also atomists — such, for instance, as the two Latin poets Ennius and Lucretius. This school taught that atoms were the foundation-bricks of the universe, for atom in the original etymological sense of the word means something that cannot be cut or divided, and therefore as being equivalent to particles of what theosophists call homogeneous substance. But modern scientists do not use the word atom in that sense any longer. Some time ago the orthodox scientific doctrine concerning the atom was basically that enunciated by Dalton, to the general effect that physical atoms were hard little particles of matter, ultimate particles of matter, and therefore indivisible and indestructible. But modern science [1933] has a totally new view of the physical atom, for it knows now that the atom is not such, but is composite, builded of particles still more minute, called electrons or charges of negative electricity, and of other particles called protons or charges of positive electricity, which protons are supposed to form the nucleus or core of the atomic structure. A frequent picture of atomic structure is that of an atomic solar system, the protons being the atomic sun and the electrons being its planets, the latter in extremely rapid revolution around the central sun. This conception is purely theosophical in idea, and adumbrates what occultism teaches, though occultism goes much farther than does modern science. One of the fundamental postulates of the teachings of theosophy is that the ultimates of nature are atoms on the material side and monads on the energy side. These two are respectively material and spiritual primates or ultimates, the spiritual ones or monads being indivisibles, and the atoms being divisibles — things that can be divided into composite parts. It becomes obvious from what precedes that the philosophical idea which formed the core of the teaching of the ancient initiated atomists was that their atoms or indivisibles are pretty close to what theosophical occultism calls monads; and this is what Democritus and Leucippus and others of their school had in mind. These monads, as is obvious, are therefore divine-spiritual life-atoms, and are actually beings living and evolving on their own planes. Rays from them are the highest parts of the constitution of beings in the material realms.
  • (TG) Atri, Sons of {Sans} . A class of Pitris, the ancestors of man, or the so-called Prajapati, progenitors; one of the seven Rishis who form the constellation of the Great Bear.
  • (WG) Atri, a famous Rishi, author of a number of Vedic hymns.
  • (TG) Attavada (Pali) . The sin of personality.
  • (FY) Attavada, the sin of personality ( Pali ).
  • (TG) Atyantika {Sans} . One of the four kinds of pralaya or dissolution. The absolute pralaya.
  • (WG) Atyantika Pralaya, absolute dissolution or obscuration, as, for instance, of a whole planetary chain.
  • (SKs) Atyantika-Pralaya, Naimittika-Pralaya Atyantika is a compound of ati — beyond, and anta — end, hence in combination meaning ‘endless.’ The Atyantika-Pralaya or ‘Endless Dissolution’ is enjoyed by an individual who attains Nirvana before the close of the Planetary Manvantara or ‘Planetary Manifestation.’ Such a god-man is called a Jivanmukta or ‘freed Monad,’ and because his Nirvana or period of peace and rest is so much longer than the long Nirvana period enjoyed by all beings between Manvantaras, this Pralayic time is considered Atyantika or eternal. However, this is only a metaphorical phrase, because no Pralaya or Nirvana lasts forever.
  • Naimittika means ‘occasional,’ the opposite of Nitya or ‘constant.’ The Naimittika-Pralaya is one which takes place at rare intervals of time, and can therefore be applied to a Planetary or Solar or Universal Pralaya.
  • (TG) Atziluth {Hebr} . The highest of the Four Worlds of the Kabbalah referred only to the pure Spirit of God. See Aziluth for another interpretation.
  • (TG) Audlang {Nors} . The second Heaven made by Deity above the field of Ida, in the Norse legends.
  • (TG) Audumla {Nors} . The symbol of nature in the Norse mythology; the cow who licks the salt rock, whence the divine Buri is born, before man’s creation.
  • (TG) Audumla {Nors} . The Cow of Creation, the nourisher, from which poured four streams of milk which fed the giant Ymir or Orgelmir (matter in ebullition) and his sons, the Hrimthurses (Frost-giants), before the appearance of gods or men. Having nothing to graze upon she licked the salt of the ice-rocks and thus produced Buri, the Producer in his turn, who had a son Bor (the born) who married a daughter of the Frost Giants, and had three sons, Odin (Spirit), Wili (Will), and We (Holy). The meaning of the allegory is evident. It is the precosmic union of the elements, of Spirit, or the creative Force, with Matter, cooled and still seething, which it forms in accordance with universal Will. Then the Ases, the pillars and supports of the World (Cosmocratores), step in and create as All-father wills them.
  • (MO) Audhumla {Nors} (a-ood-hum-la) [mythic cow] Symbol of fertility
  • (TG) Augiras. One of the Prajapatis. A son of Daksha; a lawyer, etc., etc.
  • (TG) Augoeides {Greek} . Bulwer Lytton calls it the Luminous Self, or our Higher Ego. But Occultism makes of it something distinct from this. It is a mystery. The Augoeides is the luminous divine radiation of the EGO which, when incarnated, is but its shadow — pure as it is yet. This is explained in the Amshaspends and their Ferouers .
  • (WG) Augoeides (Greek, literally meaning the self -luminous or shining one), a term applied by the Neo-Platonists to the Higher Ego or Individuality of man, as contradistinguished from his lower self or personality. In the Secret Doctrine the hints given in Isis Unveiled are explained by the statement that the Augoeides, the Father in Heaven, the Higher Ego, are synonymous terms referring to the Manasa-Dhyani, who incarnated in or overshadowed the mindless men of the third race, and thus conferred on them the potency of divine, conscious immortality.
  • (TG) Aum {Sans} . The sacred syllable; the triple-lettered unit; hence the trinity in one.
  • (VS) Aum (I 10) [[p. 5]] Kala Hamsa , the Bird or Swan ( Vide No. 11). Says the Nada-Bindu Upanishad (Rig Veda) translated by the Kumbakonum Theos. Society The syllable A is considered to be its (the bird Hamsa’s) right wing, U, its left, M, its tail, and the Ardha-matra (half metre) is said to be its head.
  • (FY) Aum, the sacred syllable in Sanskrit representing the trinity.
  • (WG) Aum, the same as Om, which see.
  • (AUPAPADUKA)
  • (TG) Anupadaka {Sans} . Anupapadaka, also Aupapaduka; means parentless, self-existing, born without any parents or progenitors. A term applied to certain self-created gods, and the Dhyani Buddhas.
  • (WG) Anupadaka, without progenitors; a name applied to celestial beings generally, and also to the highest Adepts.
  • (OG) Aupapaduka — {Sans} A compound term meaning self-produced, spontaneously generated. It is a term applied in Buddhism to a class of celestial beings called dhyani-buddhas; and because these dhyani-buddhas are conceived of as issuing forth from the bosom of Adi-buddhi or the kosmic mahat without intermediary agency, are they mystically said to be, as H. P. Blavatsky puts it, parentless or self-existing, i.e., born without any parents or progenitors. They are therefore the originants or root from which the hierarchy of buddhas of various grades flows forth in mystical procession or emanation or evolution. There are variants of this word in Sanskrit literature, but they all have the same meaning. The term aupapaduka is actually a key word, opening a doctrine which is extremely difficult to set forth; but the doctrine itself is inexpressibly sublime. Indeed, not only are there aupapaduka divinities of the solar system, but also of every organic entity, because the core of the core of any organic entity is such an aupapaduka divinity. It is, in fact, a very mystical way of stating the doctrine of the inner god. [NOTE: Later research shows that anupapadaka , as found in Monier-Williams’ Sanskrit-English Dictionary , is a misreading of aupapaduka . Cf. Franklin Edgerton, Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Grammar and Dictionary , Yale University Press, New Haven, 1953, 2:162. — PUBLISHER]
  • (SKs) Anupapadaka One who is self-born; from an — not, upa — according to, and the causative form of the verb-root pad — to proceed; hence Anupapadaka means ‘one who does not cause to proceed according to regular succession,’ ‘parentless.’ A Buddha or any other human being who so purifies his intermediate nature that it may become a channel for his inner divinity is called an Anupapadaka Avatara. (See Avatara in [[SKo]]). His divinity is born or becomes manifest because of the man’s own efforts, it is self-evolved. Thus all the beings or gods of the Hierarchy of Compassion are known as Anupapadaka.
  • (SP) Anupapadaka — having no progenitor, parentless, name of a class of celestial beings.
  • (IN) Anupapadaka {Sans} Parentless, self-born or -existing; applied in Buddhism to certain self-created gods and dhyani-buddhas.
  • (TG) Aura {Greek} A subtle invisible essence or fluid that emanates from human and animal bodies and even things. It is a psychic effluvium, partaking of both the mind and the body, as it is the electro-vital, and at the same time an electro-mental aura; called in Theosophy the akasic or magnetic aura.
  • (KT) Aura {Latin} A subtile invisible essence or fluid that emanates from human, animal, and other bodies. It is a psychic effluvium partaking of both the mind and the body, as there is both an electro-vital and at the same time an electro-mental aura; called in Theosophy the Akasic or magnetic aura. In R. C. Martyrology, a Saint.
  • (OG) Aura — An extremely subtle and therefore invisible essence or fluid that emanates from and surrounds not only human beings and beasts, but as a matter of fact plants and minerals also. It is one of the aspects of the auric egg and therefore the human aura partakes of all the qualities that the human constitution contains. It is at once magneto-mental and electrovital, suffused with the energies of mind and spirit — the quality in each case coming from an organ or center of the human constitution whence it flows. It is the source of the sympathies and antipathies that we are conscious of. Under the control of the human will it can be both life-giving and healing, or death-dealing; and when the human will is passive the aura has an action of its own which is automatic and follows the laws of character and latent impulses of the being from whom it emanates. Sensitives have frequently described it in more or less vague terms as a light flowing from the eyes or the heart or the tips of the fingers or from other parts of the body. Sometimes this fluid, instead of being colorless light, manifests itself by flashing and scintillating changes of color — the color or colors in each case depending not only upon the varying moods of the human individual, but also possessing a background equivalent to the character or nature of the individual. Animals are extremely sensitive to auras, and some beasts even descry the human being surrounded with the aura as with a cloud or veil. In fact, everything has its aura surrounding it with a light or play of color, and especially is this the case with so-called animated beings. The essential nature of the aura usually seen is astral and electrovital. The magnificent phenomena of radiation that astronomers can discern at times of eclipse, long streamers with rosy and other colored light flashing forth from the body of the sun, are not flames nor anything of the sort, but are simply the electrovital aura of the solar body — a manifestation of solar vitality, for the sun in occultism is a living being, as indeed everything else is.
  • (OG) Auric Egg — A term which appertains solely to the more recondite teachings of occultism, of the esoteric philosophy. Little can be said here about it except to state that it is the source of the human aura as well as of everything else that the human septenary constitution contains. It is usually of an oviform or egg-shaped appearance, whence its name. It ranges from the divine to the astral-physical, and is the seat of all the monadic, spiritual, intellectual, mental, passional, and vital energies and faculties of the human septiform constitution. In its essence it is eternal, and endures throughout the pralayas as well as during the manvantaras, but necessarily in greatly varying fashion in these two great periods of kosmic life.
  • (TG) Aurnavabha {Sans} . An ancient Sanskrit commentator.
  • (TG) Aurva {Sans} . The Sage who is credited with the invention of the fiery weapon called Agneyastra .
  • (TG) Ava-bodha {Sans} . Mother of Knowledge. A title of Aditi.
  • (WG) Avabodha, waking, perception, discrimination, knowledge.
  • (TG) Avaivartika {Sans} . An epithet of every Buddha: lit., one who turns no more back; who goes straight to Nirvana.
  • (TG) Avalokiteswara {Sans} . The on-looking Lord. In the exoteric interpretation, he is Padmapani (the lotus bearer and the lotus-born) in Tibet, the first divine ancestor of the Tibetans, the complete incarnation or Avatar of Avalokiteswara; but in esoteric philosophy Avaloki, the on-looker, is the Higher Self, while Padmapani is the Higher Ego or Manas. The mystic formula Om mani padme hum is specially used to invoke their joint help. While popular fancy claims for Avalokiteswara many incarnations on earth, and sees in him, not very wrongly, the spiritual guide of every believer, the esoteric interpretation sees in him the LOGOS, both celestial and human. Therefore, when the Yogacharya School has declared Avalokiteswara as Padmapani to be the Dhyani Bodhisattva of Amitabha Buddha, it is indeed, because the former is the spiritual reflex in the world of forms of the latter, both being one — one in heaven, the other on earth.
  • (FY) Avalokitesvara, manifested wisdom, or the Divine Spirit in man.
  • (WG) Avalokitesvara, a Bhodhisattva; the manifested Logos, the synthesis of the seven Dhyani-Buddhas or Dhyan-Chohanic hosts. ( avalokita, seen; isvara, lord: the lord who is manifest [to the Self]. Rhys Davids renders it, the lord who looks down from on high
  • (OG) Avalokitesvara — {Sans} A compound word: avalokita, perceived, seen; Isvara, lord; hence the Lord who is perceived or cognized, i.e., the spiritual entity, whether in the kosmos or in the human being, whose influence is perceived and felt; the higher self. This is a term commonly employed in Buddhism, and concerning which a number of intricate and not easily understood teachings exist. The esoteric or occult interpretation, however, sees in Avalokitesvara what Occidental philosophy calls the Third Logos, both celestial and human. In the solar system it is the Third Logos thereof; and in the human being it is the higher self, a direct and active ray of the divine monad. Technically Avalokitesvara is the dhyani-bodhisattva of Amitabha-Buddha — Amitabha-Buddha is the kosmic divine monad of which the dhyani-bodhisattva is the individualized spiritual ray, and of this latter again the manushya-buddha or human buddha is a ray or offspring.
  • (SP) Avalokitesvara — in Mahayana Buddhism, the Bodhisattva who especially embodies compassion: Tibetan Chenrezi, Chinese Kuan-yin , and Japanese Kannon .
  • (WG) Avarana-sakti, the power that makes one thing appear as another.
  • (WG) Avarana-sakti, centripetal force or power.
  • (TG) Avarasaila Sangharama {Sans} . Lit., the School of the Dwellers on the western mountain. A celebrated Vihara (monastery) in Dhanakstchaka, according to Eitel, built 600 B.C., and deserted A.D. 600.
  • (TG) Avastan {Sans} . An ancient name for Arabia.
  • (TG) Avasthas {Sans} . States, conditions, positions.
  • (FY) Avasthas, states, conditions, positions.
  • (WG) Avastha, state, condition.
  • (SKv) Avastha, Jagrat , Svapna, Sushupti, Turiya Avastha is a state or condition of consciousness; derived from the verb-root stha — to stand, to be, and ava — down. There are four Avasthas or states of conscious ness: Jagrat is ‘the waking state,’ that condition of consciousness in which a man normally acts while awake; from the verb-root jagri — to be awake. Svapna is ‘the sleeping-dreaming state,’ that condition of sleeping-dreaming consciousness which a man undergoes while passing through the astral realms either in reverie, in sleep, or after death; derived from the verb-root svap — to sleep, to dream. Sushupti is ‘the deep-sleeping state,’ a state of self-oblivion and utter unconsciousness for the Human Ego, but a conscious state for the Higher Mind. Dr. de Purucker says: It is a consciousness so intense, so keen, so spiritual, with reaches so vast, that the poor limited brain . . . cannot hold it or record it. [ The Theosophical Forum , April, 1936, p. 252] This state of Sushupti is enjoyed by a man’s Higher Ego (often called the Reimbodying Ego or Manasaputric Ego) during deep sleep, and after death in the higher degrees of Devachan, and during spiritual Initiations. Turiya is ‘the fourth state of consciousness,’ that of pure divine-spiritual consciousness or Samadhi. Turiya is a derived form of chatur meaning ‘four.’ This state, often called Turiya-Samadhi, is attained by Buddhas and Christs in their moments of enlightened self-realization. When the Spirit within man returns to its parent-source during sleep and after death it enjoys Turiya-Samadhi. It is also the state into which a man enters who has become at one with the Cosmic Divinity, the Hierarch of our Solar Universe.
  • (SP) Avastha — a state of consciousness, of which there are four: jagrat — ordinary waking consciousness svapna [swapna] — dreaming sleep susupti [sushupti] — dreamless sleep turiya — literally the fourth, spiritual consciousness.
  • (WG) Avastha-traya, the three states of the soul, according to Vedanta philosophy, known to uninitiated humanity, namely: jagrata, waking state; svapna, dreaming state; and sushupti, dreamless sleep. (See also Turiya
  • (TG) Avatara {Sans} . Divine incarnation. The descent of a god or some exalted Being, who has progressed beyond the necessity of Rebirths, into the body of a simple mortal. Krishna was an avatar of Vishnu. The Dalai Lama is regarded as an avatar of Avalokiteswara, and the Teschu Lama as one of Tson-kha-pa, or Amitabha. There are two kinds of avatars: those born from woman, and the parentless, the anupapadaka .
  • (KT) Avatara {Sans} Divine incarnation. The descent of a god or some exalted Being who has progressed beyond the necessity for rebirth, into the body of a simple mortal. Krishna was an Avatar of Vishnu. The Dalai-Lama is regarded as an Avatar of Avalokiteswara and the Teschu-Lama as one of Tson-Kha-pa, or Amitabba. These are two kinds of Avatars: one born from woman and the other parentless — Anupadaka.
  • (FY) Avatar, the incarnation of an exalted being, so called among the Hindus.
  • (WG) Avatara, an avatar, the appearance of any deity upon earth, but more particularly the incarnations of Vishnu in his ten principal forms, namely: the fish, tortoise, boar, man-lion, dwarf, the two Ramas, Krishna, Buddha, and Kalki, the last yet to come, and which will take place at the end of the four yugas.
  • (OG) Avatara — {Sans} The noun-form derived from a compound of two words: ava , prepositional prefix meaning down, and tri , verb-root meaning to cross over, to pass; thus, avatri — to pass down, or to descend. Hence the word signifies the passing down of a celestial energy or of an individualized complex of celestial energies, which is equivalent to saying a celestial being, in order to overshadow and illuminate some human being — but a human being who, at the time of such connection of heaven with earth, of divinity with matter, possesses no karmically intermediate or connecting link between the overshadowing entity and the physical body: in other words, no human soul karmically destined to be the inner master of the body thus born. The intermediate link necessary, so that the human being-to-be may have the human intermediate or psychological apparatus fit to express the invisible splendor of this celestial descent, is supplied by the deliberate and voluntary entrance into the unborn child — and coincidently with the overshadowing of the celestial power — of the psychological or intermediate principle of one of the Greater Ones, who thus completes what is to be the pure and lofty human channel through which the descending divinity may manifest, this divinity finding in this high psychological principle a sufficiently evolved link enabling it to express itself in human form upon earth. Hence an avatara is one who has a combination of three elements in his being: an inspiring divinity; a highly evolved intermediate nature or soul, which is loaned to him and is the channel of that inspiring divinity; and a pure, clean, physical body. WW Avatara Now let us examine Avatara. This comes from a Sanskrit verb avatari . Now ava is a particle meaning down, tri means to pass over, to go over, as to pass over a river, to cross. The sense in which it is used in the word avatara, is the passing or crossing down of a divinity from the gods’ natural state into the life of man, to incarnate in human body. For instance, Krishno – vatarati , Krishna incarnates, Krishna comes down, crosses down. Avatara, in other words, is the incarnation or passing into human flesh, of a divine being. There are other meanings applied to this, but they are subtle, and they are beyond our present purpose. So for the present we can remember that avatara is practically the same as incarnation; incarnation you will remember meaning in-fleshing. The incarnation, according to the Christian theory, was thus an avatara or the second person of the Trinity; a very, very old conception indeed in its elements. Greek mythological story is full of the incarnations of gods and goddesses, and so are the religions of Hindustan.
  • (SK)o Avatara An Avatara is a descent of a Divinity from the divine spheres into our human world. The word is derived from the preposition ava — down, and the verb-root tri — to pass. An Avatara is a spiritual event brought about by White Magic in order to effect some spiritual work among men. This Avatara or god in human form is a temporary combination of three elements: an inspiring divinity from the realms of the gods, a highly evolved soul loaned by a Buddha or Bodhisattva, and a physical body which is found to be clean and pure.
  • (SP) Avatara — a descent or incarnation of divine energy, an avatar.
  • (TG) Avebury or Abury . In Wiltshire are the remains of an ancient megalithic Serpent temple: according to the eminent antiquarian Stukeley, 1740, there are traces of two circles of stones and two avenues; the whole has formed the representation of a serpent.
  • (TG) Avesta {avesta} . Lit. , the Law. From the old Persian Abasta , the law. The sacred Scriptures of the Zoroastrians. Zend means in the Zend-Avesta — a commentary or interpretation. It is an error to regard Zend as a language, as it was applied only to explanatory texts, to the translations of the Avesta (Darmsteter).
  • (FY) Avesta, the sacred books of the Zoroastrians.
  • (TG) Avicenna. The latinized name of Abu-Ali al Hoseen ben Abdallah Ibn Sina; a Persian philosopher, born 980 A.D., though generally referred to as an Arabian doctor. On account of his surprising learning he was called the Famous, and was the author of the best and the first alchemical works known in Europe, All the Spirits of the Elements were subject to him, so says the legend, and it further tells us that owing to his knowledge of the Elixir of Life, he still lives, as an adept who will disclose himself to the profane at the end of a certain cycle.
  • (TG) Avitchi {Sans} . A state: not necessarily after death only or between two births, for it can take place on earth as well. Lit., uninterrupted hell. The last of the eight hells we are told, where the culprits die and are reborn without interruption — yet not without hope of final redemption. This is because Avitchi is another name for Myalba (our earth) and also a state to which some soulless men are condemned on this physical plane.
  • (WG) Avitchi, a state of the soul. The place or time for this state is not always after death, for it may be in life and on this very earth. It is called the last of the eight hells, and is commonly thought of as a state after death of the body.
  • (OG) Avichi — {Sans} A word, the general meaning of which is waveless, having no waves or movement, suggesting the stagnation of life and being in immobility; it also means without happiness or without repose. A generalized term for places of evil realizations, but not of punishment in the Christian sense; where the will for evil, and the unsatisfied evil longings for pure selfishness, find their chance for expansion — and final extinction of the entity itself. Avichi has many degrees or grades. Nature has all things in her; if she has heavens where good and true men find rest and peace and bliss, so has she other spheres and states where gravitate those who must find an outlet for the evil passions burning within. They, at the end of their avichi, go to pieces and are ground over and over, and vanish away finally like a shadow before the sunlight in the air — ground over in nature’s laboratory. ( See also Eighth Sphere)
  • (SK)o Avichi An after-death state of evil realizations of many degrees, experienced by those who have lived lives of wickedness, sensuality, avarice, and deceit, etc. The word Avichi is a compound of a — not, and vichi — waves, or pleasure; hence having no movement of life, stagnation, or a place without pleasure. Unless a man can rise from this state, drawn upwards by some flash of the divine nature’s having expressed itself during life, he will after long misery and suffering finally enter the Eighth Sphere or Planet of Death, and having there been ground over in nature’s laboratory, will vanish from this sphere.
  • (SP) Avici [avichi] — the lowest hell, literally the waveless.
  • (TG) Avidya {Sans} . Opposed to Vidya, Knowledge. Ignorance which proceeds from, and is produced by the illusion of the Senses or Viparyaya .
  • (WG) Avidya, Without knowledge, ignorance, illusion; personified illusion, or Maya, in Buddhism, ignorance together with non-existence. ( a, not, without; vidya, knowledge
  • (OG) Avidya {Sans} A compound word: a, not; vidya , knowledge; hence nonknowledge, ignorance — perhaps a better translation would be nescience — ignorance or rather lack of knowledge of reality, produced by illusion or maya.
  • (SP) Avidya — ignorance.
  • (TG) Avikara {Sans} . Free from degeneration; changeless — used of Deity.
  • (WG) Avikara, changeless, undifferentiating.
  • (TG) Avyakta {Sans} . The unrevealed cause; indiscrete or undifferentiated; the opposite of Vyakta , the differentiated. The former is used of the unmanifested, and the latter of the manifested Deity, or of Brahma
  • (FY) Avyakta, the unrevealed cause.
  • (WG) Avyakta, indiscrete or undifferentiated matter, the primordial principle whence the phenomenal world is produced; mulaprakriti; the all-soul
  • (TG) Axieros {Greek} the Kabiri.
  • (TG) Axiocersa, {Greek} of the Kabiri.
  • (TG) Axiocersus {Greek} of the Kabiri.
  • (TG) Ayana {Sans} . A period of time; two Ayanas complete a year, one being the period of the Sun’s progress northward, and the other southward in the ecliptic.
  • (TG) Ayin {Hebr} . Lit. , Nothing, whence the name of Ain-Soph
  • (TG) Aymar, Jacques. A famous Frenchman who had great success in the use of the Divining Rod about the end of the 17th century; he was often employed in detecting criminals; two M.D’s of the University of Paris, Chauvin and Garnier reported on the reality of his powers. See Colquhoun on Magic . [W. W. W]
  • (TG) Ayur Veda {Sans} . Lit., the Veda of Life.
  • (TG) Ayuta {Sans} . 100 Koti, or a sum equal to 1,000,000,000.
  • (TG) Azareksh {avesta} . A place celebrated for a fire-temple of the Zoroastrians and Magi during the time of Alexander the Great.
  • (TG) Azazel {Hebr} . God of Victory; the scape-goat for the sins of Israel. He who comprehends the mystery of Azazel, says Aben-Ezra, will learn the mystery of God’s name, and truly. See Typhon and the scape-goat made sacred to him in ancient Egypt.
  • (TG) Azhi-Dahaka {avesta} . One of the Serpents or Dragons in the legends of Iran and the Avesta Scriptures, the allegorical destroying Serpent or Satan.
  • (TG) Aziluth {Hebr} . The name for the world of the Sephiroth, called the world of Emanations Olam Aziluth . It is the great and the highest prototype of the other worlds. Atzeelooth is the Great Sacred Seal by means of which all the worlds are copied which have impressed on themselves the image on the Seal; and as this Great Seal comprehends three stages, which are three zures (prototypes) of Nephesh (the vital Spirit or Soul), Ruach (the moral and reasoning Spirit), and the Neshamah (the Highest Soul of man), so the Sealed have also received three zures , namely Breeah, Yetzeerah, and Aseeyah, and these three zures are only one in the Seal (Myer’s Qabbalah ). The globes A, Z, of our terrestial chain are in Aziluth. (See Secret
  • (TG) Azoth {Hebr} . The creative principle in Nature, the grosser portion of which is stored in the Astral Light. It is symbolized by a figure which is a cross (See Eliphas Levi), the four limbs of which bear each one letter of the word Taro, which can be read also Rota, Ator, and in many other combinations, each of which has an occult meaning.
  • (TG) B. — The second letter in almost all the alphabets, also the second in the Hebrew. Its symbol is a house, the form of Beth, the letter itself indicating a dwelling, a shed or a shelter. As a compound of a root, it is constantly used for the purpose of showing that it had to do with stone; when stones at Beth-el are set up, for instance. The Hebrew value as a numeral is two. Joined with its predecessor, it forms the word Ab, the root of ‘father’, Master, one in authority, and it has the Kabalistical distinction of being the first letter in the Sacred Volume of the Law. The divine name connected with this letter is Bakhour.
  • (TG) Baal {Chald} Baal {Hebr} or Adon (Adonai) was a phallic god. Who shall ascend unto the hill (the high place) of the Lord; who shall stand in the place of his Kadushu ? (Psalms The circle-dance performed by King David round the ark, was the dance prescribed by the Amazons in the Mysteries, the dance of the daughters of Shiloh (Judges and the same as the leaping of the prophets of Baal (I. Kings 18). He was named Baal-Tzephon, or god of the crypt (Exodus) and Seth, or the pillar (phallus), because he was the same as Ammon (or Baal-Hammon) of Egypt, called the hidden god. Typhon, called Set, who was a great god in Egypt during the early dynasties, is an aspect of Baal and Ammon as also of Siva, Jehovah and other gods. Baal is the all-devouring Sun, in one sense, the fiery Moloch.
  • (TG) Babil Mound {Chald}
  • (TG) Babil Mound {Hebr} site of the Temple of Bel at Babylon.
  • (PV) Bacabs The four cosmic bearers of the Mayas. The four world pillars whose foundations are in the underworld. During the Third Age, the four primeval giants (Vukup Cakix, his wife, and their two sons) are transformed into these world pillars.
  • (TG) Bacchus {Greek}. Exoterically and superficially the god of wine and the vintage, and of licentiousness and joy; but the esoteric meaning of this personification is more abstruse and philosophical. He is the Osiris of Egypt, and his life and significance belong to the same group as the other solar deities, all sin-bearing, killed and resurrected; e.g., as Dionysos or Atys of Phrygia (Adonis, or the Syrian Tammuz), as Ausonius, Baldur, , All these were put to death, mourned for, and restored to life. The rejoicings for Atys took place at the Hilaria on the pagan Easter, March 15th. Ausonius, a form of Bacchus, was slain at the vernal equinox, March 21st, and rose in three days. Tammuz, the double of Adonis and Atys, was mourned by the women at the grove of his name over Bethlehem, where the infant Jesus cried, says St. Jerome. Bacchus is murdered and his mother collects the fragments of his lacerated body as Isis does those of Osiris, and so on. Dionysos Iacchus, torn to shreds by the Titans, Osiris, Krishna, all descended into Hades and returned again. Astronomically, they all represent the Sun; psychically they are all emblems of the ever-resurrecting Soul (the Ego in its re-incarnation); spiritually, all the innocent scape-goats, atoning for the sins of mortals, their own earthly envelopes, and in truth, the poeticized image of DIVINE MAN, the form of clay informed by its God.
  • (TG) Bacon, Roger. A Franciscan monk, famous as an adept in Alchemy and Magic Arts. Lived in the thirteenth century in England. He believed in the philosopher’s stone in the way all the adepts of Occultism believe in it; and also in philosophical astrology. He is accused of having made a head of bronze which having an acoustic apparatus hidden in it, seemed to utter oracles which were words spoken by Bacon himself in another room. He was a wonderful physicist and chemist, and credited with having invented gunpowder, though he said he had the secret from Asian (Chinese) wise men.
  • (TG) Baddha {Sans}. Bound, conditioned; as is every mortal who has not made himself free through Nirvana.
  • (FY) Baddha, bound or conditioned; the state of an ordinary human being who has not attained Nirvana.
  • (TG) Bagavadam {Sans}. A Tamil Scripture on Astronomy and other matters.
  • (TG) Bagh-bog {slav} a Slavonian name for the Greek Bacchus, whose name became the prototype of the name God or Bagh and bog or bogh; the Russian for God.
  • (TG) Bahak-Zivo {Gnos}. The father of the Genii in the Codex Nazaraeus. The Nazarenes were an early semi-Christian sect.
  • (FY) Bahihpragna, the present state of consciousness.
  • (TG) Bal {Hebr}. Commonly translated Lord, but also Bel, the Chaldean god, and Baal, an idol.
  • (TG) Bala {Sans}, or Panchabalani. The five powers to be acquired in Yoga practice; full trust or faith; energy; memory; meditation; wisdom.
  • (TG) Baldur {Nors}. The Giver of all Good. The bright God who is the best and all mankind are loud in his praise; so fair and dazzling is he in form and features, that rays of light seem to issue from him. (Edda). Such was the birth-song chanted to Baldur who resurrects as Wali, the spring Sun. Baldur is called the well-beloved the Holy one, who alone is without sin. He is the God of Goodness, who shall be born again, when a new and purer world will have arisen from the ashes of the old, sin-laden world (Asgard). He is killed by the crafty Loki, because Frigga, the mother of the gods, while entreating all creatures and all lifeless things to swear that they will not injure the well-beloved, forgets to mention the weak mistletoe bough, just as the mother of Achilles forgot her son’s heel. A dart is made of it by Loki and he places it in the hands of blind Hodur who kills with it the sunny-hearted god of light. The Christmas mistletoe is probably a reminiscence of the mistletoe that killed the Northern God of Goodness.
  • (MO) Balder {Nors} (bahl-der) An Ase: the sun-god
  • (TG) Bal-ilu {Chald} One of the many titles of the Sun.
  • (TG) Bamboo Books. Most ancient and certainly pre-historic works in Chinese containing the antediluvian records of the Annals of China. They were found in the tomb of King Seang of Wai, who died 295 B.C., and claim to go back many centuries.
  • (TG) Bandha {Sans}. Bondage; life on this earth; from the same root as Baddha.
  • (WG) Bandha, fettering; bondage, as opposed to moksha or emancipation.
  • (FY) Baodhas, consciousness; the fifth principle of man.
  • (TG) Baphomet {Greek}. The androgyne goat of Mendes. (See Secret Doctrine, I. 253). According to the Western, and especially the French Kabalists, the Templars were accused of worshipping Baphomet, and Jacques de Molay, the Grand Master of the Templars, with all his brother-Masons, suffered death in consequence. But esoterically, and philologically, the word never meant goat, nor even anything so objective as an idol. The term means according to Von Hammer, baptism or initiation into Wisdom, from the Greek words baphe and metis, and from the relation of Baphometus to Pan. Von Hammer must be right. It was a Hermetico-Kabalistic symbol, but the whole story as invented by the Clergy was false
  • (TG) Baptism {Greek}. The rite of purification performed during the ceremony of initiation in the sacred tanks of India, and also the later identical rite established by John the Baptist and practised by his disciples and followers, who were not Christians. This rite was hoary with age when it was adopted by the Chrestians of the earliest centuries. Baptism belonged to the earliest Chaldeo-Akkadian theurgy; was religiously practised in the nocturnal ceremonies in the Pyramids where we see to this day the font in the shape of the sarcophagus; was known to take place during the Eleusinian mysteries in the sacred temple lakes, and is practised even now by the descendants of the ancient Sabians. The Mendaeans (the El Mogtasila of the Arabs) are, notwithstanding their deceptive name of St. John Christians, less Christians than are the Orthodox Mussulman Arabs around them. They are pure Sabians; and this is very naturally explained when one remembers that the great Semitic scholar Renan has shown in his Vie de Jesus that the Aramean verb seba, the origin of the name Sabian, is a synonym of the Greek bapitizo . The modern Sabians, the Mendaeans, whose vigils and religious rites, face to face with the silent stars, have been described by several travellers, have still preserved the theurgic, baptismal rites of their distant and nigh-forgotten forefathers, the Chaldean Initiates. Their religion is one of multiplied baptisms, of seven purifications in the name of the seven planetary rulers, the seven Angels of the Presence of the Roman Catholic Church. The Protestant Baptists are but the pale imitators of the El Mogtasila or Nazareans who practise their Gnostic rites in the deserts of Asia Minor
  • (TG) Bardesanes or Bardaisan. A Syrian Gnostic, erroneously regarded as a Christian theologian, born at Edessa (Edessene Chronicle) in 155 of our era (Assemani Bibl. Orient. i. 389). He was a great astrologer following the Eastern Occult System. According to Porphyry (who calls him the Babylonian, probably on account of his Chaldeeism or astrology), Bardesanes . . . . held intercourse with the Indians that had been sent to the Caesar with Damadamis at their head (De Abst. iv. 17), and had his information from the Indian gymnosophists. The fact is that most of his teachings, however much they may have been altered by his numerous Gnostic followers, can be traced to Indian philosophy, and still more to the Occult teachings of the Secret System. Thus in his Hymns he speaks of the creative Deity as Father-Mother, and elsewhere of Astral Destiny (Karma) of Minds of Fire (the Agni-Devas) He connected the Soul (the personal Manas) with the Seven Stars, deriving its origin from the Higher Beings (the divine Ego); and therefore admitted spiritual resurrection but denied the resurrection of the body, as charged with by the Church Fathers. Ephraim shows him preaching the signs of the Zodiac, the importance of the birth-hours and proclaiming the seven. Calling the Sun the Father of Life and the Moon the Mother of Life, he shows the latter laying aside her garment of light (principles) for the renewal of the Earth. Photius cannot understand how, while accepting the Soul free from the power of genesis (destiny of birth) and possessing free will, he still placed the body under the rule of birth (genesis). For they (the Bardesanists) say, that wealth and poverty and sickness and health and death and all things not within our control are works of destiny (Bibl. Cod. 223, p. 221-f). This is Karma, most evidently, which does not preclude at all free-will. Hippolytus makes him a representative of the Eastern School. Speaking of Baptism, Bardesanes is made to say It is not however the Bath alone which makes us free, but the Knowledge of who we are, what we are become, where we were before, whither we are hastening, whence we are redeemed; what is generation (birth), what is re-generation (re-birth). This points plainly to the doctrine of re-incarnation. His conversation (Dialogue) with Awida and Barjamina on Destiny and Free Will shows it. What is called Destiny, is an order of outflow given to the Rulers (Gods) and the Elements, according to which order the Intelligences (Spirit-Egos) are changed by their descent into the Soul, and the Soul by its descent into the body. (See Treatise, found in its Syriac original, and published with English translation British Museum
  • (TG) Bardesanian (System). The Codex of the Nazarenes, a system worked out by one Bardesanes. It is called by some a Kabala within the Kabala; a religion or sect the esotericism of which is given out in names and allegories entirely sui-generis. A very old Gnostic system. This codex has been translated into Latin. Whether it is right to call the Sabeanism of the Mendaites (miscalled St. John’s Christians), contained in the Nazarene Codex, the Bardesanian system, as some do, is doubtful; for the doctrines of the Codex and the names of the Good and Evil Powers therein, are older than Bardaisan. Yet the names are identical in the two systems.
  • (TG) Baresma (Zend). A plant used by Mobeds (Parsi priests) in the fire-temples, wherein consecrated bundles of it are kept.
  • (MO) Bargalmer, Bergelmir {Nors} (bare-vell-meer) [a titan] Fruitage of a universal lifetime
  • (FY) Barhaspatyamanam, a method of calculating time prevalent during the later Hindu period in North-eastern India.
  • (TG) Barhishad {Sans}. A class of the lunar Pitris or Ancestors, Fathers, who are believed in popular superstition to have kept up in their past incarnations the household sacred flame and made fire-offerings. Esoterically the Pitris who evolved their shadows or chhayas to make therewith the first man. (See Secret Doctrine,
  • (WG) Barhishad, a class of lunar pitris who are creators of physical man. ( baris, sacrificial grass, kusa; sad, seated: seated on the kusa grass
  • (MO) Barre {Nors} (bar-reh) [ barr pine needle] The sacred grove of peace. Snorri speaks of the ash as having barr, having never seen a tree. There were none in Iceland.
  • (TG) Basildean ( System ). Named after Basilides; the Founder of one of the most philosophical gnostic sects. Clement the Alexandrian speaks of Basilides, the Gnostic, as a philosopher devoted to the contemplation of divine things. While he claimed that he had all his doctrines from the Apostle Matthew and from Peter through Glaucus, Irenaeus reviled him, Tertullian stormed at him, and the Church Fathers had not sufficient words of obloquy against the heretic. And yet on the authority of St. Jerome himself, who describes with indignation what he had found in the only genuine Hebrew copy of the Gospel of Matthew (See Isis Unv., ii., 181) which he got from the Nazarenes, the statement of Basilides becomes more than credible, and if accepted would solve a great and perplexing problem. His 24 vols. of Interpretation of the Gospels, were, as Eusebius tells us, burnt. Useless to say that these gospels were not our present Gospels. Thus, truth was ever crushed.
  • (TG) Basileus {Greek}. The Archon or Chief who had the outer supervision during the Eleusinian Mysteries. While the latter was an initiated layman, and magistrate at Athens, the Basileus of the inner Temple was of the staff of the great Hierophant, and as such was one of the chief Mystae and belonged to the inner mysteries.
  • (TG) Bassantin, James. A Scotch astrologer. He lived in the 16th century and is said to have predicted to Sir Robert Melville, in 1562, the death and all the events connected therewith of Mary, the unfortunate Queen of Scots.
  • (TG) Bath {Hebr}. Daughter.
  • (TG) Bath Kol {Hebr}. Daughter of the Voice: the Divine afflatus, or inspiration, by which the prophets of Israel were inspired as by a voice from Heaven and the Mercy-Seat. In Latin Filia Vocis. An analogous ideal is found in Hindu exoteric theology named Vach, the voice, the female essence, an aspect of Aditi, the mother of the gods and primeval Light; a mystery.
  • (TG) Batoo {Egyp}. The first man in Egyptian folk-lore. Noum, the heavenly artist, creates a beautiful girl — the original of the Grecian Pandora — and sends her to Batoo, after which the happiness of the first man is destroyed.
  • (TG) Batria {Egyp}. According to tradition, the wife of the Pharaoh and the teacher of Moses.
  • (TG) Beel-Zebub {Hebr}. The disfigured Baal of the Temples, and more correctly Beel-Zebul. Beel-Zebub means literally god of flies; the derisory epithet used by the Jews, and the incorrect and confused rendering of the god of the sacred scarabaei, the divinities watching the mummies, and symbols of transformation, regeneration and immortality. Beel-Zeboul means properly the God of the Dwelling and is spoken of in this sense in Matthew x. 25. As Apollo, originally not a Greek but a Phoenician god, was the healing god, Paian, or physician, as well as the god of oracles, he became gradually transformed as such into the Lord of Dwelling, a household deity, and thus was called Beel-Zeboul. He was also, in a sense, a psychopompic god, taking care of the souls as did Anubis. Beelzebub was always the oracle god, and was only confused and identified with Apollo latter on.
  • (TG) Bel {Chald}. The oldest and mightiest god of Babylonia, one of the earliest trinities, — Anu ; Bel, Lord of the World, father of the gods, Creator, and Lord of the City of Nipur; and Hea, maker of fate, Lord of the Deep, God of Wisdom and esoteric Knowledge, and Lord of the City of Eridu. The wife of Bel, or his female aspect (Sakti), was Belat, or Beltis, the mother of the great gods, and the Lady of the City of Nipur. The original Bel was also called Enu, Elu and Kaptu (see Chaldean account of Genesis, by G. Smith). His eldest son was the Moon God Sin (whose names were also Ur, Agu and Itu), who was the presiding deity of the city of Ur, called in his honour by one of his names. Now Ur was the place of nativity of Abram (see Astrology). In the early Babylonian religion the Moon was, like Soma in India, a male, and the Sun a female deity. And this led almost every nation to great fratricidal wars between the lunar and the solar worshippers — e.g ., the contests between the Lunar and the Solar Dynasties, the Chandra and Suryavansa in ancient Aryavarta. Thus we find the same on a smaller scale between the Semitic tribes. Abram and his father Terah are shown migrating from Ur and carrying their lunar god (or its scion) with them; for Jehovah Elohim or El — another form of Elu — has ever been connected with the moon. It is the Jewish lunar chronology which has led the European civilized nations into the greatest blunders and mistakes. Merodach, the son of Hea, became the later Bel and was worshipped at Babylon. His other title, Belas, has a number of symbolical meanings.
  • (TG) Bela-Shemesh {Hebr}
  • (TG) Bela-Shemesh {Chald} Lord of the Sun, the name of the Moon during that period when the Jews became in turn solar and lunar worshippers and when the Moon was a male, and the Sun a female deity. This period embraced the time between the allegorical expulsion of Adam and Eve from Eden down to the no less allegorical Noachian flood. (See Secret
  • (MO) Bele’s bane {Nors} (bay-leh) The sword of Frey
  • (TG) Bembo, Tablet of; or Mensa Isiaca. A brazen tablet inlaid with designs in Mosaic (now in the Museum at Turin) which once belonged to the famous Cardinal Bembo. Its origin and date are unknown. It is covered with Egyptian figures and hieroglyphics, and is supposed to have been an ornament in an ancient Temple of Isis. The learned Jesuit Kircher wrote a description of it, and Montfaucon has a chapter devoted to it. The only English work on the Isiac Tablet is by Dr. W. Wynn Westcott, who gives a photogravure in addition to its history, description, and occult significance.
  • (TG) Ben {Hebr}. A son; a common prefix in proper names to denote the son of so-and-so, e.g ., Ben Solomon, Ben Ishmael, etc.
  • (TG) Be-ness. A term coined by Theosophists to render more accurately the essential meaning of the untranslatable word Sat. The latter word does not mean Being, for it presupposes a sentient feeling or some consciousness of existence. But, as the term Sat is applied solely to the absolute Principle, the universal, unknown, and ever unknowable Presence, which philosophical Pantheism postulates in Kosmos, calling it the basic root of Kosmos, and Kosmos itself — Being was no fit word to express it. Indeed, the latter is not even, as translated by some Orientalists, the incomprehensible Entity; for it is no more an Entity than a non-Entity, but both. It is, as said, absolute Be-ness, not Being, the one secondless, undivided, and indivisible All — the root of all Nature visible and invisible, objective and subjective, to be sensed by the highest spiritual intuition, but never to be fully comprehended.
  • (KT) Beness. A term coined by Theosophists to render more accurately the essential meaning of the untranslatable word Sat. The latter word does not mean Being, for the term Being presupposes a sentient consciousness of existence. But as the term Sat is applied solely to the absolute principle, that universal, unknown, and ever unknowable principle which philosophical Pantheism postulates, calling it the basic root of Kosmos and Kosmos itself, it could not be translated by the simple term Being. Sat, indeed, is not even, as translated by some Orientalists, the incomprehensible Entity; for it is no more an Entity than a non-entity, but both. It is as said absolute BENESS, not Being; the one, secondless, undivided and indivisible ALL — the root of nature both visible and invisible, objective and subjective, comprehensible and — never to be fully comprehended.
  • (TG) Ben Shamesh {Hebr}. The children or the Sons of the Sun. The term belongs to the period when the Jews were divided into sun and moon worshippers — Elites and Belites
  • (TG) Benoo {Egyp}. A word applied to two symbols, both taken to mean Phoenix . One was the Shen-shen (the heron), and the other a nondescript bird, called the Rech (the red one), and both were sacred to Osiris. It was the latter that was the regular Phoenix of the great Mysteries, the typical symbol of self-creation and resurrection through death — a type of the Solar Osiris and of the divine Ego in man. Yet both the Heron and the Rech were symbols of cycles; the former, of the Solar year of 365 days; the latter of the tropical year or a period covering almost 26,000 years. In both cases the cycles were the types of the return of light from darkness, the yearly and great cyclic return of the sun-god to his birth-place, or — his Resurrection. The Rech-Benoo is described by Macrobius as living 660 years and then dying; while others stretched its life as long as 1,460 years. Pliny, the Naturalist, describes the Rech as a large bird with gold and purple wings, and a long blue tail. As every reader is aware, the Phoenix on feeling its end approaching, according to tradition, builds for itself a funeral pile on the top of the sacrificial altar, and then proceeds to consume himself thereon as a burnt-offering. Then a worm appears in the ashes, which grows and developes rapidly into a new Phoenix, resurrected from the ashes of its predecessor.
  • (TG) Berasit {Hebr}. The first word of the book of Genesis. The English established version translates this as In the beginning, but this rendering is disputed by many scholars. Tertullian approved of In power; Grotius When first; but the authors of the Targum of Jerusalem who ought to have known Hebrew if anyone did, translated it In Wisdom. Godfrey Higgins, in his Anacalypsis, insists on Berasit being the sign of the ablative case, meaning in and ras, rasit, an ancient word for Chokmah, wisdom. [w.w.w.]
  • (TG) Berasit or Berasheth is a mystic word among the Kabbalists of Asia Minor.
  • (TG) Bergelmir {Nors}. The one giant who escaped in a boat the general slaughter of his brothers, the giant Ymir’s children, drowned in the blood of their raging Father. He is the Scandinavian Noah, as he, too, becomes the father of giants after the Deluge. The lays of the Norsemen show the grandsons of the divine Buri — Odin, Wili, and We — conquering and killing the terrible giant Ymir, and creating the world out of his body.
  • (TG) Berosus {Chald}. A priest of the Temple of Beltis who wrote for Alexander the Great the history of the Cosmogony, as taught in the Temples, from the astronomical and chronological records preserved in that temple. The fragments we have in the soi-disant translations of Eusebius are certainly as untrustworthy as the biographer of the Emperor Constantine — of whom he made a saint (!!) — could make them. The only guide to this Cosmogony may now be found in the fragments of the Assyrian tablets, evidently copied almost bodily from the earlier Babylonian records; which, say what the Orientalists may, are undeniably the originals of the Mosaic Genesis, of the Flood, the tower of Babel, of baby Moses set afloat on the waters, and of other events. For, if the fragments from the Cosmogony of Berosus, so carefully re-edited and probably mutilated and added to by Eusebius, are no great proof of the antiquity of these records in Babylonia — seeing that this priest of Belus lived three hundred years after the Jews were carried captive to Babylon, and they may have been borrowed by the Assyrians from them — later discoveries have made such a consoling hypothesis impossible. It is now fully ascertained by Oriental scholars that not only Assyria borrowed its civilization and written characters from Babylonia, but the Assyrians copied their literature from Babylonian sources. Moreover, in his first Hibbert lecture, Professor Sayce shows the culture both of Babylonia itself and of the city of Eridu to have been of foreign importation; and, according to this scholar, the city of Eridu stood already 6,000 years ago on the shores of the Persian gulf, i.e ., about the very time when Genesis shows the Elohim creating the world, sun, and stars out of nothing.
  • (TG) Bes {Egyp}. A phallic god, the god of concupiscence and pleasure. He is represented standing on a lotus ready to devour his own progeny (Abydos). A rather modern deity of foreign origin.
  • (TG) Bestla {Nors}. The daughter of the Frost giants, the sons of Ymir; married to Burl, and the mother of Odin and his brothers (Edda).
  • (TG) Beth {Hebr}. House, dwelling.
  • (TG) Beth Elohim {Hebr}. A Kabbalistic treatise treating of the angels, souls of men, and demons. The name means House of the Gods.
  • (TG) Betyles {Phoen}. Magical stones. The ancient writers call them the animated stones; oracular stones, believed in and used both by Gentiles and Christians. (See Sect. Doct. II. p. 342).
  • (TG) Bhadayat {Sans}. A title of the Buddha and of Krishna. The Lord literally.
  • (TG) Bhadrakalpa {Sans}. Lit., The Kalpa of the Sages. Our present period is a Bhadra Kalpa, and the exoteric reaching makes it last 236 million years. It is so called because 1,000 Buddhas or sages appear in the course of it (Sanskrit Chinese have already appeared it adds; but as out of the 236 millions, over 151 Million years have already elapsed, it does seem a rather uneven distribution of Buddhas. This is the way exoteric or popular religions confuse everything. Esoteric philosophy teaches us that every Root-race has its chief Buddha or Reformer, who appears also in the seven sub-races as a Bodhisattva . Gautama Sakyamuni was the fourth, and also the fifth Buddha: the fifth, because we are the fifth root-race; the fourth, as the chief Buddha in this fourth Round. The Bhadra Kalpa, or the period of stability, is the name of our present Round, esoterically — its duration applying, of course, only to our globe (D), the 1,000 Buddhas being thus in reality limited to but forty-nine in all.
  • (TG) Bhadrasena {Sans}. A Buddhist king of Magadha.
  • (FY) Bhadrasena, a Buddhist king of Magadha.
  • (TG) Bhadra Vihara {Sans}. Lit., the Monastery of the Sages or Bodhisattvas. A certain Vihara or Matham in Kanyakubdja.
  • (TG) Bhagats {Sans}. Also called Sokka and Sivnath by the Hindus; one who exorcises evil spirits.
  • (FY) Bhagats (or called Sokha and Sivnath by the Hindus), one who exorcises and evil spirit.
  • BHAGAVAD-GITA
  • Favorite Quotations from the Bhagavad-Gita , from The Gods and Heroes of the Bhagavad-Gita
  • The Song Celestial, or The Bhagavad Gita by Sir Edwin Arnold
  • William Q. Judge’s recension of the Bhagavad Gita including his Essays on the Gita (on another site)
  • (TG) Bhagavad-gita {Sans}. Lit., the Lord’s Song. A portion of the Mahabharata, the great epic poem of India. It contains a dialogue wherein Khrishna — the Charioteer — and Arjuna, his Chela, have a discussion upon the highest spiritual philosophy. The work is pre-eminently occult or esoteric.
  • (KT) Bhagavat-Gita {Sans} Lit. , the Lord’s Song, a portion of the Mahabharata, the great epic poem of India. It contains a dialogue wherein Krishna — the Charioteer and Arjuna his chela have a discussion upon the highest spiritual philosophy. The work is pre-eminently occult or esoteric.
  • (FY) Bhagavad Gita ( lit. The Lord’s Song), an episode of the Maha-Bharata, the great epic poem of India. It contains a dialogue between Krishna and Arjuna on Spiritual Philosophy.
  • (WG) Bhagavad-Gita, an epic in the Mahabharata, consisting of a dialogue between Krishna and Arjuna, which is carried on in a chariot drawn up between two opposing armies. The chariot means, esoterically, the body; Arjuna is the Ego; Krishna is the Supreme Spirit, and the opposing hosts of Kauravas and Pandavas are the higher and lower natures of man; the horses may be called the mind, which draws the body. The poem has been translated by Burnouf into French, by Lassen into Latin, by Stanislav Gotti into Italian, by Galanos into Greek, by Wilkins, Davies, Thompson, Kasinath Telang, Chintamon, Mohini, Arnold and others into English. ( bhagavat, having happiness, blessed; gita, song: song of the blessed one
  • (GH) Bhagavad-Gita literally Krishna’s song (or divine song). The philosophical discourse between Arjuna and Krishna, the latter being represented as the Avatara of Vishnu, but acting as Arjuna’s charioteer. It is cast in the traditional form of question and answer between disciple and teacher in verses of metrical prose termed slokas. The meter is called Anu-shtubh and consists of four padas or quarter verses of eight syllables each, or two lines of sixteen syllables each. The dialog is placed in the sixth book of the Mahabharata entitled the Bhishma-parva (the book of Bhishma) slokas 830-1532 thereof. The work is pre-eminently occult or esoteric, writes H. P. Blavatsky in Theosophical Glossary, p. 56, and also states in The Secret Doctrine, that there is a secret sense contained in the Bhagavad-Gita. (II, p. 139)
  • The main object of the Bhagavad Gita — which is one of the main sources of Hindu philosophy — is to explain the higher principles that operate in the cosmos, which are omnipresent and permanent and which are common to all the solar systems. ( Notes on the Bhagavad-Gita, p. 108) (Compound bhagavat, holy, divine; also a name of Krishna
  • (SP) Bhagavad-gita — the famous Hindu text, literally the Lord’s Song.
  • (WG) Bhakti, devotion, a thing apportioned or set apart, portion.
  • (SK)o Bhakti Devotion, faith, or love; derived from the verb-root bhaj -to serve, to honor.
  • (WG) Bhakti-yoga, systematized devotion for the attainment of union with Parabrahmam, prescribed in the Visishtadvaita Catechism as the contemplation of Parabrahmam, with its various attributes and qualities, without any interruption whatever, throughout one’s whole life, and at the same time discharging one’s duties to the best of one’s ability, or true devotion. (See also the Bhagavad-Gita for prescription of and insistence upon attainment of devotion, conjoined with strict performance of duty
  • (OG) Bhakti {Sans} A word derived from the verbal root bhaj . In connection with yoga and as being one of the recognized forms of it, the general signification of bhakti yoga is devotion, affectionate attachment
  • (TG) Bhao {Sans}. A ceremony of divination among the Kolarian tribes of Central India.
  • (FY) Bhao, ceremony of divination among the Kolarian tribes of Central India.
  • (WG) Bharata, the one supported, an epithet of Agni as being maintained or kept alive by men; the true consciousness, of which the consciousness of the interior faculties is a reflection; an epithet given Arjuna in the Bhagavad-Gita to signify his intimate relation with his race and nation.
  • (GH) Bharata The name of a great number of kings and heroes. The one referred to in the Bhagavad-Gita is of the Puru branch (or Pauravas) of the Chandravansa (Lunar Race), the son of Dushyanta and Sakuntala. The ninth king in descent from Bharata was Kuru, and the seventeenth from Kuru was Yudhishthira and his four brothers, i.e. , the Pandavas. ( Bhagavad-Gita, W. Q. Judge, p. 11
  • (GH) Bharata A descendant of Bharata: referable to either the Kauravas or the Pandavas, but most often applied solely to the latter. Arjuna is often referred to as ‘son of Bharata’ or ‘best of the Bharatas.’ ( Bhagavad-Gita, W. Q. Judge, p. 11)
  • (TG) Bharata Yarsha {Sans}. The land of Bharata, an ancient name of India.
  • (WG) Bharata-varsha, India.
  • (TG) Bhargayas {Sans}. An ancient race in India; from the name of Bhrigu, the Rishi.
  • (TG) Bhashya (Sk). A commentary.
  • (FY) Bhashya, commentary.
  • (IN) Bhashya {Sans} A treatise or commentary.
  • (TG) Bhaskara {Sans}. One of the titles of Surya, the Sun; meaning life-giver and light-maker.
  • (TG) Bhaya {Sans}. Being, or state of being; the world, a birth, and also a name of Siva.
  • (TG) Bhikshu {Sans}. In Pali Bikkhu. The name given to the first followers of Sakyamuni Buddha. Lit., mendicant scholar. The Sanskrit Chinese Dictionary, explains the term correctly by dividing Bhikshus into two classes of Sramanas (Buddhist monks and priests), viz ., esoteric mendicants who control their nature by the (religious) law, and exoteric mendicants who control their nature by diet; and it adds, less correctly: every true Bhikshu is supposed to work miracles.
  • (WG) Bhikshus, religious mendicants, or mendicant scholars among the Buddhists. There are two sorts, those who control themselves by religion and those who control themselves by the nature of their foods. At one time they were supposed to be wonder-workers.
  • (SKs) Bhikshu, Bhikshuni A Bhikshu is one who has renounced the world of desire and illusion and who devotes his life entirely to things of a spiritual and lofty nature. A Buddhist Bhikshu is one who follows a stricter code of precepts than does the Upasaka.
  • The object of this chapter is not to cover all the Sanskrit words found in The Secret Doctrine, but to clarify and explain those which are the most important, because the most current in Theosophical literature. Bhikshuni is the feminine form of Bhikshu. Both words are derived from the verb-root bhiksh — to wish to share, or to partake, to beg.
  • (WG) Bhima, son of Vayu the god of the wind; presiding deity of the air, allegorically representing power; a Vidarbhan king; the higher nature of man. (Literally, terrible
  • (GH) Bhima The second son of Kunti by the god of the wind, Vayu. All through the Mahabharata the remarkable achievements of Bhima provide entertaining reading: his feats of valor and strength are unsurpassable, especially those performed with his enormous club. He shared with Arjuna the honors of valorous exploits in the great conflict, in which the Pandavas were finally victorious. (Meaning of the word itself: the terrible. Bhagavad-Gita, W. Q. Judge, p. 3)
  • (WG) Bhishma, the grandsire (grandfather’s step-brother) of both the Kauravas and the Pandavas, allegorically representing the lower nature of man. (Literally, horrible
  • (GH) Bhishma The son of king Santanu and the river-goddess Ganga. Although the rightful heir to the throne of the Kurus, he relinquished the kingdom so that the children of his father’s second wife, Satyavati might rule instead, but he remained the protector to the throne. Thus he was the ancestor of both the Kauravas and the Pandavas (referred to in the text as the grandsire of the Kurus). He was persuaded to side with the sons of Dhritarashtra and was made the commander-in-chief. He was mortally wounded on the tenth day of the conflict, but as he had been granted the boon to terminate his life whenever he wished, Bhishma remained alive for 58 days and instructed Yudhishthira in the duties of a king. (Meaning of the word itself: the terrible. Bhagavad-Gita, W. Q. Judge, p. 2)
  • (WG) Bhoga, fruition, enjoyment.
  • (WG) Bhokta, the consciousness pervading the Buddhi, and which appears as conscious beings.
  • (TG) Bhons {Tibe}. The followers of the old religion of the Aborigines of Tibet; of pre-buddhistic temples and ritualism; the same as Dugpas, red caps, though the latter appellation usually applies only to sorcerers.
  • (FY) Bhon, religion of the aborigines of Tibet.
  • (TG) Bhrantidarsanatah {Sans}. Lit., false comprehension or apprehension something conceived of on false appearances as a mayavic, illusionary form.
  • (WG) Bhrantidarsanatah, false perception, the perception of one who moves (or thinks) unsteadily, without aim.
  • (TG) Bhrigu {Sans}. One of the great Vedic Rishis. He is called Son by Manu, who confides to him his Institutes. He is one of the Seven Prajapatis, or progenitors of mankind, which is equivalent to identifying him with one of the creative gods, placed by the Puranas in Krita Yug, or the first age, that of purity. Dr. Wynn Westcott reminds us of the fact that the late and very erudite Dr. Kenealy (who spelt the name Byighoo), made of this Muni (Saint) the fourth, out of his twelve, divine messengers to the World, adding that he appeared in Tibet, A.N. 4800 and that his religion spread to Britain, where his followers raised the mega Lit hic temple of Stonehenge. This, of course, is a hypothesis, based merely on Dr. Kenealy’s personal speculations.
  • (WG) Bhrigu, the planet Venus; a race of beings described in the Rig-Veda as cherishing fire brought to them by the wind, or as kindling fire from the aranis; that one of the ten Maharshis from whom these beings descended. It in some sense gives a clue to the use and function of Venus in relation to our earth.
  • (GH) Bhrigu One of the most celebrated of the Vedic Rishis or Sages, regarded as the ancestor of the Bhargavas (in which race Parasu-Rama was born). He is known as one of the ten Prajapatis (or mind-born sons of Brahma — regarded as the fathers of the human race). He is also regarded as one of the nine great Rishis (in the Vishnu-Purana). The Laws of Manu were confided to Bhrigu, and Manu called him his son. Some hymns in the Rig-Veda are attributed to the Rishi. ( Bhagavad-Gita, W. Q. Judge, p. 74)
  • (WG) Bhuh, the world.
  • (TG) Bhumi {Sans}. The earth, called also Prithivi.
  • (WG) Bhumi, the earth. See also Bhuh.
  • (TG) Bhuranyu {Sans}. The rapid or the swift. Used of a missile — an equivalent also of the Greek Phoroneus.
  • (TG) Bhur-Bhuya {Sans}. A mystic incantation, as Om, Bhur, Bhuva, Sway, meaning Om, earth, sky, heaven This is the exoteric explanation.
  • (TG) Bhur-loka {Sans}. One of the 14 lokas or worlds in Hindu Pantheism; our Earth.
  • (WG) Bhurloka, the place of earth, the terrestrial world.
  • (WG) Bhuta, an element; created being, elemental, ghost, goblin, imp, demon, phantom, elementary.
  • (OG) Bhuta(s) — {Sans} The past participle of the verb-root bhu, meaning to be, or to become; hence bhutas literally means has beens — entities that have lived and passed on. The bhutas are shells from which all that is spiritual and intellectual has fled: all that was the real entity has fled from this shell, and naught is left but a decaying astral corpse. The bhutas are the spooks, ghosts, simulacra, reliquiae, of dead men; in other words, the astral dregs and remnants of human beings. They are the shades of the ancients, the pale and ghostly phantoms living in the astral world, or the astral copies of the men that were; and the distinction between the bhuta and the kama-rupa is very slight.
  • Bereft of all that pertains to the real entity, the genuine man, the bhuta is as much a corpse in the astral realms as is the decaying physical body left behind at physical death; and consequently, astral or psychical intercourse of any kind with these shells is productive only of evil. The bhutas, although belonging in the astral world, are magnetically attracted to physical localities similar in type to the remnants of impulses still inhering in them. The bhuta of a drunkard is attracted to wine cellars and taverns; the bhuta of one who has lived a lewd life is attracted to localities sympathetic to it; the thin and tenuous bhuta of a good man is similarly attracted to less obnoxious and evil places. All over the ancient world and throughout most of even the modern world these eidola or images of dead men have been feared and dreaded, and relations of any kind with them have been consistently and universally avoided. ( See also Eidolon)
  • (GH) Bhutas The decaying remnants of corpses in the astral world — the real part of man having dropped off these grossest portions of its former vehicle; hence phantoms or ‘shells’, the eidola or shades of the ancients. They are popularly believed to haunt burial places, etc., for these remnants, although in the astral world (and invisible), are still attracted to the localities of their former physical associations. (The following word is derived from the verbal root:) bhu, to become; literally ‘has-beens’, i.e. , entities that formerly lived and have passed on. Bhagavad-Gita , W. Q. Judge, p. 68)
  • (IN) Bhuta {Sans} A has-been; ghost or astral shell of a deceased person minus soul and spirit.
  • (SP) Bhuta — ghost, shade or astral shell of the dead, literally has been; also cosmic element.
  • (WG) Bhuta-dak, a spirit-medium; one who holds communion with elementals. (A mongrel word, dak usually meaning carriage
  • (TG) Bhutadi {Sans}. Elementary substances, the origin and the germinal essence of the elements.
  • (TG) Bhutan. A country of heretical Buddhists and Lamaists beyond Sikkhim, where rules the Dharma Raja, a nominal vassal of the Dalai Lama.
  • (TG) Bhuta-sarga {Sans}. Elemental or incipient Creation, i.e ., when matter was several degrees less material than it is now.
  • (WG) Bhutatma, the vital soul, or elemental self, as opposed to Kshetrajna. ( bhuta , elemental; atma, self,
  • (TG) Bhuhta-vidya {Sans}. The art of exorcising, of treating and curing demoniac possession. Literally, Demon or Ghost-knowledge.
  • (TG) Bhutesa {Sans}, or Bhuleswara; lit., Lord of beings or of existent lives. A name applied to Vishnu, to Brahma and Krishna.
  • (TG) Bhuts {Sans}. Bhuta: Ghosts, phantoms. To call them demons, as do the Orientalists, is incorrect. For, if on the one hand, a Bhuta is a malignant spirit which haunts cemeteries, lurks in trees, animates dead bodies, and deludes and devours human beings, in popular fancy, in India in Tibet and China, by Bhutas are also meant heretics who besmear their bodies with ashes, or Shaiva ascetics (Siva being held in India for the King of Bhutas).
  • (WG) Bhuvah, sky.
  • (TG) Bhuya-loka {Sans}. One of the 14 worlds.
  • (TG) Bhuyana {Sans}. A name of Rudra or Siva, one of the Indian Trimurti (Trinity). WW Biblical Translation When we come to the study of cosmogony, later, after we have finished our definitions, it will be very interesting to point out the meaning of the words employed here, and how they can be used in their different senses. Ancient Hebrew, like all old languages, was written without any vowels. The ‘points’ by which the words are now read, by which the sense is given, are of far later development, and arose because the ancient Hebrew, with the passage of time, became a dead language and some means was needed to fix the pronunciation and division of the letters into words. For instance, take this, being the first words in the English translation of Genesis: nthbggnnnggdcrtdthhvnndtrth As ancient Hebrew was written in an exactly similar fashion, you see the need of some means of distinguishing what this tremendous file of letters might mean. So what did they do? According to tradition, according to the learned men of the day, they began to set forth, found, a school of commentators, a school of critics, and they began to ‘point’ these letters. They are called the Masoretic points, from the system called Massorah, or the literary efforts of these early commentators of the Hebrew scriptures. The Massorah was probably only fully completed between the 5th and 9th centuries after the reputed birth of Jesus. One of the principal things to remember here is: how did they know that their interpretation was always right? Considering a row of letters like that above, the Hebrew records were practically endless, going on and on, line after line, throughout the scrolls, and almost any reading might have been put in by changing the vowel points. So when we come to study the question of the cosmogony of the book of Genesis, as set forth in the Hebrew, we will see that there are different ways of reading these words, and that different constructions and different meanings may be drawn from them, by changing the vowel points. If one construction is good, with the consonants, another construction is good, and providing it is consistent, and coherent with the text, and is not offensive to good sense nor any faculty of judgment we have, there is as much reason to adopt it as there is to adopt that which is not consonant with good sense, and which degrades our conception of the Deity. It is a monstrous idea, at least I so consider it, to think that man was made after the pattern and image of, the Ineffable, imperfect as man is. But consider that a hierarchy is his pattern, and that he is made after the image of those which are above him, as those creatures which are below him are made after his image, and thus a man could truly say: Let us make the lower things in our image, etc. By his life and thought, man does ‘make’ the beings below him. Another favorite method of expression of the Hebrew Bible is that God ‘said’ this and God ‘said’ that. What man believes that God spoke, that God said so and so? No sane man. It was a mode of expression common in ancient times. It is so in Homer, in the Chaldean, Egyptian, and Hindu sacred writings. What man ever believed that Aphrodite fled weeping to her Olympian mansion from the plains of Troy, her white hand stained with the immortal ichor from her veins? Or that Ares, the God of War, was wounded in his fight with Diomed, and bellowed with rage and pain like ten thousand men? (Iliad, v, 330, 860). As poetry, as symbols, as a way of expression, knowing that those who read would probably have the key, and would understand, it is as good a method as any; far better than most, because the graphic figure remains in the mind. For instance, the story of woman being made from the rib of a man — as a story itself, this is grotesque. So seriously was that taken that at one time the medical men of Europe searched for the place of the missing rib and could not find it. Now take the ancient story of the hermaphroditic race as related by Plato in his Symposium, 190, that original man was bisexual, and for their sins Zeus cut them in two, as you will divide an egg with a hair, and that then Apollo closed up the back side. And the ancients, with great logic and consistency pointed to the remnants of physiological organs in us, such as the rudimentary mammae or breasts of man, which through the ages have not disappeared. The principal thing, I believe to keep fixed in the memory is the fact that a hierarchy — and we came to that conclusion in our last study — is not composed of orders of beings one order above another like stairs, but they interpenetrate very much like concentric spheres, qualifying that with the understanding that it is these spheres which interpenetrate — not concentric circles, but concentric spheres. Every order of the hierarchy has its individuality and its personality; in other words is composed of individuals or persons, not necessarily men, but unitary entities. Each works with each, harmoniously, and although the subject is far beyond our present study and we have no time to develop a matter of such magnitude and importance, nevertheless, this thing may be alluded to: the origin of evil. Now you commonly hear the phrase the origin of evil is a matter which has taxed the mightiest intellects of the race. That is a well-formed rhetorical flourish, and it is principally said by those to whom the origin is an abstruse mystery. It was not so considered by the ancients. To the ancients the origin of evil was no more abstruse than the origin of good; but as Christian philosophers, so-called, and Christian theologians could find no explanation for the origin of evil except in God’s will or the devil’s, and the devil’s will ultimately depending from the will of God, they are between the horns of a dilemma. Which shall they choose? If they say that evil exists in the world through the devil, and the devil being ultimately a creature of God, God is then the primal author of evil, and they consider that monstrous. If they say evil comes from God, they come to the same conclusion, and so they are constantly see-sawing back and forth from one to the other, finding either seat very uneasy. Remember that when we refer to the Deity, we say It; we ascribe no sex to our Deity. It is natural that they should say evil and its origin are unexplainable, and that they have taxed the mightiest intellects of humanity.
  • Now in all discussions certain things must be taken for granted. In all mathematical problems there must be axioms, there must be certain mathematical postulates; otherwise we arrive nowhere. For instance, in trigonometry certain axioms of geometry are laid down which prove themselves by their inherent reasonableness. Working on those axioms, the relations of lines to each other and of lines to curves are dealt with; but we could do nothing, in the only really exact science that we have, unless there were certain principles, axioms, first accepted. In the same way we cannot consider anything with precision in any of our studies unless we have certain axioms upon which all agree. For instance, that a thing which is endless cannot have one end and have no other end; that the ultimate tribunal of proof is in man, that it is not in dogmatic authority, that it is not in prejudice nor in theories, but that each must ultimately settle within his own mind what he will accept. The principle holds even with the most bigoted and rigid Roman Catholic. He must accept as a matter of faith and belief that the Pope is the vicegerent of God on earth, but he uses his judgment in deciding. Despite himself he uses the same faculty as the man who rejects the Church and the Pope and the whole scheme of Christian theology. It is simply a matter of degree. Consequently in examining anything like our present subject we must take for granted that the world exists; later we will examine whether it is illusion or reality. We must take for granted that in the world there is heterogeneity. We see it around us. Therefore as the world is one, but diverse in its manifestations; and as we find that humanity is one, but multiple in its manifestations; as we find that man is one, but dual or triple or sextuple [septuple?] in his nature, here we come to the origin of discord which men commonly call evil. What causes evil or discord between man and man? Usually misunderstanding. What causes evil in the Universe? For instance, two spheres will meet, and two worlds will crumble into incandescent dust. Shall we say it is a fault in the celestial mechanics? Shall we ascribe it to the Deity, say the Deity is at fault, or say the origin of evil is in God? I think not. We may talk about the law of gravitation, but we know there is some logical cause for those spheres meeting. We also know that when two men meet and quarrel there is some cause, and the ultimate cause is in the will and intelligence. I think it was Col. Robert Ingersoll who spoke of the native cruelties of the world; as he expressed it, every mouth a slaughterhouse, and every stomach a tomb. It is a graphic expression of the way nature preys on itself, and it expresses the same idea that I think Tennyson does when he speaks of the red fangs of nature — nature red in tooth and claw. A sensitive heart feels it, but we do not like to think about it, and we turn away. But it has to be faced, and these problems and the truths of Theosophy are as capable of exact explanation or demonstration as are the problems of mathematics.
  • (TG) Bifrost {Nors}. A bridge built by the gods to protect Asgard. On it the third Sword-god, known as Heimdal or Riger, stands night and day girded with his sword, for he is the watchman selected to protect Asgard, the abode of gods. Heimdal is the Scandinavian Cherubim with the flaming sword, which turned every way to keep the way of the tree of life.
  • (MO) Bifrost, Bafrast, Bilrast {Nors} (bee-frost, bayv-rast, beel-rast) The rainbow bridge between men and gods
  • (TG) Bihar Gyalpo {Tibe}. A king deified by the Dugpas. A patron over all their religious buildings.
  • (OG) Bija (sometimes Vija) — {Sans} This word signifies seed or life-germ, whether of animals or of plants. But esoterically its signification is far wider and incomparably more abstruse, and therefore difficult to understand without proper study. The term is used in esotericism to designate the original or causal source and vahana or vehicle of the mystic impulse or urge of life, or of lives, to express itself or themselves when the time for such self-expression arrives after a pralaya, or after an obscuration, or again, indeed, during manvantara. Whether it be a kosmos or universe, or the reappearance of god, deva, man, animal, plant, mineral, or elemental, the seed or life-germ from and out of which any one of these arises is technically called bija, and the reference here is almost as much to the life-germ or vehicle itself as it is to the self-urge for manifestation working through the seed or life-germ. Mystically and psychologically, the appearance of an avatara, for instance, is due to an impulse arising in Maha-Siva, or in Maha-Vishnu (according to circumstances), to manifest a portion of the divine essence, in either case, when the appropriate world period arrives for the appearance of an avatara. Or again, when from the chela is born the initiate during the dread trials of initiation, the newly-arisen Master is said to have been born from the mystic bija or seed within his own being. The doctrine connected with this word bija in its occult and esoteric aspects is far too profound to receive more than a cursory and superficial treatment.
  • (SKs) Bija A seed or life-germ. All the entities of the kingdoms of Nature arise from a Bija. In Occultism an Avatara is said to be born from the mystic Bija or compassionate seed or impulse which arises in the heart of one of the gods who watch over the spiritual welfare of humanity. An Initiate may also be said to be born from the divine Bija within his own being.
  • (SP) Bija — seed, or life-germ.
  • (FY) Bikshu, a religious mendicant and ascetic who suppresses all desire and is constantly occupied in devotion; a Buddhist monk.
  • (MO) Bilskirner {Nors} (beel-sheer-ner) [flashing, shining] Valhalla’s shelf
  • (TG) Binah {Hebr}. Understanding. The third of the 10 Sephiroth, the third of the Supernal Triad; a female potency, corresponding to the letter he of the Tetragrammaton IHVH. Binah is called AIMA, the Supernal Mother, and the great Sea. [w.w.w.]
  • (WG) Binah {Hebr}, understanding. The third of the ten Sephiroth of the Kabalah. The third of the supernal triad. A female potency.
  • (VS) Bird of Life (I 12) [[p. 5]] Says the same Nada-Bindu, A Yogi who bestrides the Hamsa (thus contemplates on Aum) is not affected by Karmic influences or crores of sins.
  • (TG) Birs Nimrud {Chald}. Believed by the Orientalists to be the site of the Tower of Babel. The great pile of Birs Nimrud is near Babylon. Sir H. Rawlinson and several Assyriologists examined the excavated ruins and found that the tower consisted of seven stages of brick-work, each stage of a different colour, which shows that the temple was devoted to the seven planets. Even with its three higher stages or floors in ruins, it still rises now 154 feet above the level of the plain
  • (PV) Bitol {quiche-maya} One of six hypostases of Cabahuil or god-Seven. More especially associated with the three other hypostases: Tzakol, Alom, and Cajolom; these four are regent gods of the 4 cosmic angles; their mediation produces light. A class of builder gods.
  • (TG) Black Dwarfs . The name of the Elves of Darkness, who creep about in the dark caverns of the earth and fabricate weapons and utensils for their divine fathers, the Aesir or Ases. Called also Black Elves.
  • (TG) Black Fire A Kabbalistic term for Absolute Light and Wisdom — black because it is incomprehensible to our finite intellects.
  • (TG) Black Magic Sorcery; necromancy, or the raising of the dead, and other selfish abuses of abnormal powers. This abuse may be unintentional; yet it is still — black magic whenever anything is produced phenomenally simply for one’s own gratification.
  • (KT) Black Magic. Sorcery; necromancy, or the raising of the dead and other selfish abuses of abnormal powers. This abuse may be unintentional; still it has to remain black magic whenever anything is produced phenomenally simply for one’s own gratification.
  • (WG) Black Magic, sorcery, necromancy, calling back of the dead, selfish use of occult power of any sort. For instance, the use of hypnotism, magnetism, mesmerism, or the like for any purpose for one’s own ends, whether those ends be apparently good or evil, partakes of the nature of black magic. The development of telepathic suggestion will lead to black magic, inasmuch as it can be used for the personal ends of the operator.
  • Blavatsky, Helena P. — see biography and books on this site
  • (MO) Bleknabb {Nors} (blayk-neb) [pale beak] Eagle, the giant Rasvalg
  • (VS) midnight Blossom of Buddha (I 33) [[p. 13]] Adeptship the blossom of Bodhisattva.
  • (VS) they Blossom forth (III 21) [[p. 63]] A reference to human passions and sins which are slaughtered during the trials of the novitiate, and serve as well-fertilized soil in which holy germs or seeds of transcendental virtues may germinate. Pre-existing or innate virtues, talents or gifts are regarded as having been acquired in a previous birth. Genius is without exception a talent or aptitude brought from another birth.
  • (TG) B ‘ ne Alhim. or Beni Elohim {Hebr}. Sons of God, literally or more correctly Sons of the gods, as Elohim is the plural of Eloah. A group of angelic powers referable by analogy to the Sephira Hod. [w.w.w.]
  • (TG) Boat of the Sun. This sacred solar boat was called Sekti, and it was steered by the dead. With the Egyptians the highest exaltation of the Sun was in Aries and the depression in Libya. See Pharaoh, A blue light — which is the Sun’s Son — is seen streaming from the bark. The ancient Egyptians taught that the real colour of the Sun was blue, and Macrobius also states that his colour is of a pure blue before he reaches the horizon and after he disappears below. It is curious to note in this relation the fact that it is only since 1881 that physicists and astronomers discovered that our Sun is really blue. Professor Langley devoted many years to ascertaining the fact. Helped in this by the magnificent scientific apparatus of physical science, he has succeeded finally in proving that the apparent yellow-orange colour of the Sun is due only to the effect of absorption exerted by its atmosphere of vapours, chiefly metallic; but that in sober truth and reality, it is not a white Sun but a blue one, i.e ., something which the Egyptian priests had discovered without any known scientific instruments, many thousands of years ago!
  • (TG) Boaz {Hebr}. The great-grandfather of David. The word is from B, meaning in, and oz strength, a symbolic name of one of the pillars at the porch of King Solomon’s temple. [w.w.w.]
  • (TG) Bodha-Bodhi {Sans}. Wisdom-knowledge.
  • (SKv) Bodha, Bodhi Bodha is innate understanding and intelligence, the capacity of spiritual perception; derived from the verb-root budh — to awaken, to enlighten. Bodhi, derived from the same root, is ‘illumination,’ ‘perfect wisdom.’ The Bodhi-tree, under which legend says the Buddha attained perfect enlightenment, is mystically that source of wisdom which a man who meditates on the divinity within may attain. In India this Bodhi-tree or Tree of Wisdom is symbolized by the sacred fig-tree ( Ficus religiosa ) .
  • (TG) Bodhi or Sambodhi {Sans}. Receptive intelligence, in contradistinction to Buddhi, which is the potentiality of intelligence.
  • (VS) Bodhi [[p. 29]] True, divine Wisdom.
  • (OG) Bodhi — {Sans} This word comes from the root budh, meaning to awaken. It is the state when man has so emptied his mind that it is filled only with the self itself, with the selfless selfhood of the eternal. Then he realizes the ineffable visions of reality, of pure truth. The man who reaches this state is called a buddha, and the organ in and by which it is manifested, is termed buddhi.
  • (SP) Bodhi — awakening or enlightenment.
  • (TG) Bodhidharma {Sans}. Wisdom-religion; or the wisdom contained in Dharma (ethics). Also the name of a great Arhat Kshatriya (one of the warrior-caste), the son of a king. It was Panyatara, his guru, who gave him the name Bodhidharma to mark his understanding (bodhi) of the Law (dharma Bodhidharma, who flourished in the sixth century, travelled to China, whereto he brought a precious relic, namely, the almsbowl of the Lord Buddha.
  • (SKv) Bodhi-dharma, Bodhisattva Bodhi-dharma is ‘wisdom-religion,’ or the spiritual ethics and laws and truths that have existed throughout eternity. Theosophy may be called Bodhi-dharma. The original source of all the great religions and philosophies of the world is Bodhi-dharma. A Bodhi-sattva is ‘one whose very essence or sattva has become an incarnation of wisdom or Bodhi ,’ in other words, a human Ego who has become fully conscious of its inner divinity. In exoteric Buddhism a Bodhisattva stands one step below a Buddha.
  • (TG) Bodhi Druma {Sans}. The Bo or Bodhi tree; the tree of knowledge, the Pippala or ficus religiosa in botany. It is the tree under which Sakyamuni meditated for seven years and then reached Buddhaship. It was originally 400 feet high, it is claimed; but when Hiouen-Tsang saw it, about the year 640 of our era, it was only 50 feet high. Its cuttings have been carried all over the Buddhist world and are planted in front of almost every Vihara or temple of fame in China, Siam, Ceylon, and Tibet.
  • (TG) Bodhisattva {Sans}. Lit., he, whose essence (sattva) has become intelligence (bodhi) ; those who need but one more incarnation to become perfect Buddhas, i.e ., to be entitled to Nirvana. This, as applied to Manushi (terrestrial) Buddhas. In the metaphysical sense, Bodhisattva is a title given to the sons of the celestial Dhyani Buddhas.
  • (VS) Bodhisattva (III 33) [[p. 71]] A Bodhisattva is, in the hierarchy, less than a perfect Buddha. In the exoteric parlance these two are very much confused. Yet the innate and right popular perception, owing to that self-sacrifice, has placed a Bodhisattva higher in its reverence than a Buddha.
  • (VS) Bodhisattvas twain (III 26) [[p. 66]] In the Northern Buddhist symbology, Amitabha or Boundless Space (Parabrahm) is said to have in his paradise two Bodhisattvas Kwan-shi-yin and Tashishi who ever radiate light over the three worlds where they lived, including our own (vide 27), in order to help with this light (of knowledge) in the instruction of Yogis, who will, in their turn, save men. Their exalted position in Amitabha’s realm is due to deeds of mercy performed by the two, as such Yogis, when on earth, says the allegory.
  • (FY) Boddhisatwas, Egos evolving towards Buddhahood.
  • (WG) Bodhisattva, one who has perfect wisdom as his essence, and who will attain in only one or a certain number of births to the state of a Buddha; the terrestrial correspondent of a Dhyani-Buddha, a human Buddha.
  • (OG) Bodhisattva — {Sans} A compound word: literally he whose essence (sattva) has become intelligence (bodhi). As explained exoterically, a bodhisattva means one who in another incarnation or in a few more incarnations will become a buddha. A bodhisattva from the standpoint of the occult teachings is more than that. When a man, a human being, has reached the state where his ego becomes conscious, fully so, of its inner divinity, becomes clothed with the buddhic ray — where, so to say, the personal man has put on the garments of inner immortality in actuality, on this earth, here and now — that man is a bodhisattva. His higher principles have nearly reached nirvana. When they do so finally, such a man is a buddha, a human buddha, a manushya-buddha. Obviously, if such a bodhisattva were to reincarnate, in the next incarnation or in a very few future incarnations thereafter, he would be a manushya-buddha. A buddha, in the esoteric teaching, is one whose higher principles can learn nothing more. They have reached nirvana and remain there; but the spiritually awakened personal man, the bodhisattva, the person made semi-divine to use popular language, instead of choosing his reward in the nirvana of a less degree, remains on earth out of pity and compassion for inferior beings, and becomes what is called a nirmanakaya. In a very mystical part of the esoteric philosophy, a bodhisattva is the representative on earth of a dhyani-buddha or celestial buddha — in other words, one who has become an incarnation or expression of his own divine monad.
  • (SP) Bodhisattva — a being on the path to enlightenment or buddhahood.
  • (TG) Bodhyanga {Sans}. Lit., the seven branches of knowledge or understanding. One of the 37 categories of the Bodhi pakchika dharma, comprehending seven degrees of intelligence (esoterically, seven states of consciousness), and these are (1) Smriti, memory (2) Dharma pravitchaya, correct understanding or discrimination of the Law; (3) Virya, energy (4) Priti, spiritual joy (5) Prasrabdhi, tranquillity or quietude; (6) Samadhi, ecstatic contemplation and (7) Upeksha absolute indifference.
  • (MO) Bodvild {Nors} (beud-vild) Daughter of King Nidud
  • (VS) lunar Body (I 29) [[p. 11]] The astral form produced by the Kamic principle, the Kama rupa or body of desire.
  • (VS) mind- Body (I 30) [[p. 11]] Manasa rupa . The first refers to the astral or personal Self; the second to the individuality or the reincarnating Ego whose consciousness on our plane or the lower Manas has to be paralyzed.
  • (TG) Boehme (Jacob). A great mystic philosopher, one of the most prominent Theosophists of the mediaeval ages. He was born about 1575 at Old Seidenburg, some two miles from Gorlitz (Silesia), and died in 1624, at nearly fifty years of age. In his boyhood he was a common shepherd, and, after learning to read and write in a village school, became an apprentice to a poor shoemaker at Gorlitz. He was a natural clairvoyant of most wonderful powers. With no education or acquaintance with science he wrote works which are now proved to be full of scientific truths; but then, as he says himself, what he wrote upon, he saw it as in a great Deep in the Eternal. He had a thorough view of the universe, as in a chaos, which yet opened itself in him, from time to time, as in a young plant. He was a thorough born Mystic, and evidently of a constitution which is most rare; one of those fine natures whose material envelope impedes in no way the direct, even if only occasional, intercommunion between the intellectual and the spiritual Ego. It is this Ego which Jacob Boehme, like so many other untrained mystics, mistook for God; Man must acknowledge, he writes, that his knowledge is not his own, but from God, who manifests the Ideas of Wisdom to the Soul of Man, in what measure he pleases. Had this great Theosophist mastered Eastern Occultism he might have expressed it otherwise. He would have known then that the god who spoke through his poor uncultured and untrained brain, was his own divine Ego, the omniscient Deity within himself, and that what that Deity gave out was not in what measure he pleased, but in the measure of the capacities of the mortal and temporary dwelling IT informed.
  • (KT) Boehme (Jacob). A mystic and great philosopher, one of the most prominent Theosophists of the mediaeval ages. He was born about 1575 at Old Diedenberg, some two miles from Gorlitz (Silesia), and died in 1624,being nearly fifty years old. When a boy he was a common shepherd, and, after learning to read and write in a village school, became an apprentice to a poor shoemaker at Gorlitz. He was a natural clairvoyant of the most wonderful power. With no education or acquaintance with science he wrote works which are now proved to be full of scientific truths; but these, as he himself says of what he wrote, he saw as in a Great Deep in the Eternal. He had a thorough view of the universe, as in chaos, which yet opened itself in him, from time to time, as in a young planet, he says. He was a thorough born mystic, and evidently of a constitution which is most rare; one of those fine natures whose material envelope impedes in no way the direct, even if only occasional, intercommunication between the intellectual and spiritual Ego. It is this Ego which Jacob Boehme, as so many other untrained mystics, mistook for God. Man must acknowledge, he writes, that his knowledge is not his own, but from God, who manifests the Ideas of Wisdom to the Soul of Man in what measure he pleases. Had this great Theosophist been born 300 years later he might have expressed it otherwise. He would have known that the God who spoke through his poor uncultured and untrained brain was his own Divine Ego, the omniscient Deity within himself, and that what that Deity gave out was not what measure he pleased, but in the measure of the capacities of the mortal and temporary dwelling IT informed.
  • (PV) Bolon ti ku {quiche-maya} The god-Nine, the Nine Lords of the Night, who cooperate with god-Thirteen (Oxlahunoc) in cosmic work. The Nine Lords of the Night are headed by the old Fire god, the oldest in the Maya pantheon, who is the divine nahual of Vucup Hunahpu, or the Seven Ahpu.
  • (TG) Bona-Oma, or Bona Dea. A Roman goddess, the patroness of female Initiates and Occultists. Called also Fauna after her father Faunus. She was worshipped as a prophetic and chaste divinity, and her cult was confined solely to women, men not being allowed to even pronounce her name. She revealed her oracles only to women, and the ceremonies of her Sanctuary (a grotto in the Aventine) were conducted by the Vestals, every 1st of May. Her aversion to Men was so great that no male person was permitted to approach the house of the consuls where her festival was sometimes held, and even the portraits and the busts of men were carried out for the time from the building. Clodius, who once profaned such a sacred festival by entering the house of Caesar where it was held, in a female disguise, brought grief upon himself. Flowers and foliage decorated her temple and women made libations from a vessel (mellarium) full of milk. It is not true that the mellarium contained wine, as asserted by some writers, who being men thus tried to revenge themselves.
  • (TG) Bonati, Guido. A Franciscan monk, born at Florence in the 13th century and died in 1306. He became an astrologer and alchemist, but failed as a Rosicrucian adept. He returned after this to his monastery.
  • (TG) Bono, Peter. A Lombardian; a great adept in the Hermetic Science, who travelled to Persia to study Alchemy. Returning from his voyage fie settled in Istria in 1330, and became famous as a Rosicrucian. A Calabrian monk named Lacinius is credited with having published in 1702 a condensed version of Bono’s works on the transmutation of metals. There is, however, more of Lacinius than of Bono in the work. Bono was a genuine adept and an Initiate; and such do not leave their secrets behind them in MSS.
  • (TG) Boodhasp {Chald}. An alleged Chaldean; but in esoteric reaching it Buddhist (a Bodhisattva), from the East, who was the founder of the esoteric school of Neo-Sabeism, and whose secret rite of baptism passed bodily into the Christian rite of the same name. For almost three centuries before our era, Buddhist monks overran the whole country of Syria, made their way into the Mesopotamian valley and visited even Ireland. the name Feyho and Faho of the Codex Nazaraeus is but a corruption of Fho, Fo and Pho, the name which the Chinese, Tibetans and even Nepaulese often give to Buddha.
  • (TG) Book of the Dead. An ancient Egyptian ritualistic and occult work attributed to Thot-Hemnes. Found ill the coffins of ancient mummies
  • (WG) Book of the Dead, an Egyptian ritualistic work found on mummies, and parts of which are given in Egyptian paintings. It represents in great part the supposed trial of the soul after the death of the body, and in fact refers to the imperishable records of a man’s life in the Astral Light, and the effects in nature of his thoughts and acts, by all of which he is self-judged.
  • (TG) Book of the Keys. An ancient Kabbalistic work.
  • (KT) Book of the Keys. An ancient Kabalistic work. The original is no longer extant, though there may be spurious and disfigured copies and forgeries of it.
  • (TG) Borj {Pers}. The Mundane Mountain, a volcano or fire-mountain; the same as the Indian Meru.
  • (TG) Borri, Joseph Francis. A great Hermetic philosopher, born at Milan in the 17th century. He was an adept, an alchemist and a devoted occultist. He knew too much and was, therefore, condemned to death for heresy, in January, 1661, after the death of Pope Innocent X. He escaped and lived many years after, when finally he was recognised by a monk in a Turkish Village, denounced, claimed by the Papal Nuncio, taken back to Rome and imprisoned, August 10th, 1675. But facts show that he escaped from his prison in a way no one could account for.
  • (TG) Borsippa {Chald}. The planet-tower, wherein Bel was worshipped in the days when astrolaters were the greatest astronomers. It was dedicated to Nebo, god of Wisdom.
  • (TG) Both-al (Irish). The Both-al of the Irish is the descendant and copy of the Greek Batylos and the Beth-el of Canaan, the house of God .
  • (TG) Bragadini, Marco Antonio. A Venetian Rosicrucian of great achievements, an Occultist and Kabbalist who was decapitated in 1595 in Bavaria, for making gold.
  • (TG) Bragi {Nors}. The god of New Life, of the re-incarnation of nature and man. He is called “the divine singer” without spot or blemish. He is represented as gliding in the ship of the Dwarfs of Death during the death of nature (pralaya), lying asleep on the deck with his golden stringed harp near him and dreaming the dream of life. When the vessel crosses the threshold of Nain, the Dwarf of Death, Bragi awakes and sweeping the strings of his harp, sings a song that echoes over all the Worlds, a song describing the rapture of existence, and awakens dumb, sleeping nature out of her long death-like sleep.
  • (MO) Brage, Bragi {Nors} (brah-geh) An Ase: poetic inspiration, wisdom
  • (TG) Brahma {Sans}. The student must distinguish between Brahma the neuter, and Brahma, the male creator of the Indian Pantheon. The former, Brahma or Brahman, is the impersonal, supreme and uncognizable Principle of the Universe from the essence of which all emanates, and into which all returns, which is incorporeal, immaterial, unborn, eternal, beginningless and endless. It is all-pervading, animating the highest god as well as the smallest mineral atom. Brahma, on the other hand, the male and the alleged Creator, exists periodically in his manifestation only, and then again goes into pralaya, i.e., disappears and is annihilated.
  • (KT) Brahm {Sans} The student must distinguish between the neuter Brahma, and the male Creator of the Indian Pantheon, Brahma. The former Brahma or Brahman is the impersonal, Supreme, and uncognizable Soul of the Universe, from the essence of which all emanates, and into which all returns; which is incorporeal, immaterial, unborn, eternal, beginningless and endless. It is all-pervading, animating the highest god as well as the smallest mineral atom. Brahma, on the other hand, the male and the alleged Creator, exists in his manifestation periodically only, and passes into pralaya, i. e., disappears and is annihilated as periodically.
  • (FY) Brahma, the Hinduc Deity which personifies the active cosmic energy.
  • (WG) Brahma, the Absolute, Parabrahmam.
  • (WG) Brahma, the creator; the impersonal universe-pervading spirit personified under this name; the lord or ruler over a Brahmanda, at the end of whose “life” that system is resolved into its final elements and reabsorbed by Parabrahmam.
  • (OG) Brahma — {Sans} A word of which the root, brih, means “expansion.” It stands for the spiritual energy-consciousness side of our solar universe, i.e., our solar system, and the Egg of Brahma is that solar system.
  • A Day of Brahma or a maha-manvantara is composed of seven rounds, a period of 4,320,000,000 terrestrial years; this period is also called a kalpa. A Night of Brahma, the planetary rest period, which is also called the parinirvanic period, is of equal length.
  • Seven Days of Brahma make one solar kalpa; or, in other words, seven planetary cycles, each cycle consisting of seven rounds (or seven planetary manvantaras), form one solar manvantara.
  • One Year of Brahma consists of 360 Divine Days, each day being the duration of a planet’s life, i.e., of a planetary chain of seven globes. The Life of Brahma (or the life of the universal system) consists of one hundred Divine Years, i.e., 4,320,000,000 years times 36,000 x 2.
  • The Life of Brahma is half ended: that is, fifty of his years are gone — a period of 155,520,000,000,000 of our years have passed away since our solar system, with its sun, first began its manvantaric course. There remain, therefore, fifty more such Years of Brahma before the system sinks into rest or pralaya. As only half of the evolutionary journey is accomplished, we are, therefore, at the bottom of the kosmic cycle, i.e., on the lowest plane.
  • (GH) Brahma The first aspect of the Hindu Trimurti (or triad), the emanator or ‘creator’ — the other two being Vishnu, the ‘preserver,’ and Siva, the ‘destroyer,’ or rather the ‘regenerator.’ The idea of the Trimurti is not found in the Vedas, nor does the name Brahma occur; the active creator is therein known as Hiranyagarbha, or Prajapati: in later times the term Prajapati was bestowed on Brahma (meaning ‘the Progenitor’). In The Laws of Manu (Manava-Dharma-Sastra) it is said that the supreme soul, the selfexistent lord created the waters and deposited in them a seed, which seed became a golden egg (Hiranyagarbha) in which he himself was born as Brahma, the progenitor of all the worlds. The idea of the Trimurti is of course present in the epic poems: Brahma is represented as springing from the lotus which arose from the navel of Vishnu. From Brahma then rise the mind-born sons (the Prajapatis) who people the world. In the Puranas (especially in Vishnu-Purana), Vishnu becomes more prominent than Brahma: the latter is represented as being in its totality the aspect of Prakriti, both evolved and unevolved (Mulaprakriti), and also the aspect of Spirit, and the aspect of Time.
  • Brahma is in fact the vehicle or sheath of Brahman: the spiritual evolving or developing energy-consciousness of a solar system, i.e., the Logos, deriving from Brahman. It should be pointed out that the Sanskrit word Brahman is both masculine and neuter, and therefore has two meanings: in order to distinguish these, in Theosophical literature the masculine is spelled Brahma (the nominative form), whereas the neuter is spelled Brahman .
  • “Brahma, as ‘the germ of unknown Darkness,’ is the material from which all evolves and develops ‘as the web from the spider, as foam from the water,’ etc. . . . Brahma ‘expands’ and becomes the Universe woven out of his own substance.” ( Secret Doctrine, I, p. 83). (The following word is derived from the verbal root:) brih, to expand, to grow, also meaning to fructify Judge, p. 56 — where it should be spelled Brahman. See
  • (SK)o Brahma (masculine), Brahmanda Brahma is the Self or Hierarch of a Solar System. The Solar System or imbodiment of Brahma is often spoken of as ‘the Egg of Brahma’ or Brahmanda (a compound of Brahma and anda — egg). ‘A Day of Brahma’ consists of seven Rounds of the planetary chain, or what is called a Planetary Manvantara, a period of 4,320,000,000 terrestrial years. ‘A Night of Brahma’ is of equal duration. ‘A Week of Brahma’ or seven Planetary Manvantaras make one Solar Manvantara. ‘One Year of Brahma’ equals 360 Divine Days or Planetary Manvantaras. The ‘Life of Brahma’ consists of 100 Divine Years or Solar Manvantaras, a period of 311,040,000,000,000 terrestrial years. There are as many Brahmas as there are solar systems.
  • (SKs) Brahma, Vach, Viraj The ancient Hindu scriptures tell us in their poetic manner that the Universe was sung into being by the inspiration arising in the divine mind of Brahma, the Father of the Universe. This Divine Thought in Brahma’s mind was carried by Vach, the Mother of the Universe, or the Divine Voice, or Mystic Sound, and gave rise to Viraj, the Son, or the Divine Word, or the manifested Universe of harmony.
  • Vach literally means ‘speech’ or ‘word.’ It is often used synonymously with Svara, the ‘Divine Sound,’ and is verily ‘the music of the spheres’ spoken of by Pythagoras, who himself studied in, India. Viraj literally means ‘sovereign,’ ‘splendid,’ derived from the verb-root viraj — to be illustrious, to shine forth. [From Sanskrit Keys to the Wisdom Religion, p. 7 — H. P. Blavatsky tells us that Sanskrit has never been known nor spoken in its true systematized form except by the Initiated Brahmans. This form of Sanskrit was called, as well as by other names, Vach, the mystic speech, signifying the pulsating or vibratory tones that lie latent in its syllables and words. These tones, arranged in a Mantra, are a power in the hands of one who is familiar with the correlations of sounds, numbers, colors, and hierarchies in the Cosmos.]
  • (IN) Brahma {Sans} Hindu creator god; individualized, periodical generative aspect of Brahman; hierarch of a universe.
  • (SP) Brahma — the individual or personified aspect of brahman.
  • (TG) Brahma ‘ s Day. A period of 2,160,000,000 years during which Brahma having emerged out of his golden egg (Hiranyagarbha), creates and fashions the material world (being simply the fertilizing and creative force in Nature). After this period, the worlds being destroyed in turn, by fire and water, he vanishes with objective nature, and then comes Brahma’s Night.
  • (KT) Brahma’s Day. A period of 2,160,000,000 years, during which Brahma, having emerged out of his Golden Egg (Hiranya Garbha), creates and fashions the material world (for he is simply the fertilizing and creative force in Nature). After this period the worlds being destroyed in turn by fire and water, he vanishes with objective nature; and then comes [[Brahma’s Night.]]
  • Brahmaivedam Sarvam God is verily all This (the manifested universe)
  • (WG) Brahma-kalpa, a “day of Brahma,” embracing a period of fourteen manvantaras, together with the sandhis intervening between two Manus, equal in all to 1,000 mahayugas, or 4,320,000,000 solar years.
  • (TG) Brahma ‘ s Night. A period of equal duration, during which Brahma is said to be asleep. Upon awakening he recommences the process, and this goes on for an AGE of Brahrna composed of alternate “Days”, and “Nights”, and lasting 100 years (of 2,160,000,000 years each). It requires fifteen figures to express the duration of such an age; after the expiration of which the Mahapralaya or the Great Dissolution sets in, and lasts in its turn for the same space of fifteen figures.
  • (KT) Brahma’s Night. A period of equal duration, in which Brahma is said to be asleep. Upon awakening he recommences the process, and this goes on for an AGE of Brahma composed of alternate “Days” and “Nights,” and lasting for 100 years of 2,160,000,000 each. It requires fifteen figures to express the duration of such an age, after the expiration of which the Mahapralaya or Great Dissolution sets in, and lasts in its turn for the same space of fifteen figures.
  • (TG) Brahma Prajapati {Sans}. “Brahma, the Progenitor”, literally the “Lord of Creatures”. In this aspect Brahma is the synthesis of the Prajapati or creative Forces.
  • (TG) Brahmapuri {Sans}. Lit., “the City of Brahma”.
  • (WG) Brahma-pura, a Vedic term for the heart, also for the body. ( brahma, Brahma; pura, city: city of Brahma
  • (TG) Brahmaputras {Sans}. The Sons of Brahma.
  • (WG) Brahma-putras, sons of Brahma.
  • (WG) Brahma-samadhi, abstract meditation upon Brahma, perfect absorption in thought upon the Supreme Spirit.
  • (TG) Brahma Vach {Sans}. Male and female Brahma. Vach is also sometimes called the female logos; for Vach means Speech, literally, (See Manu, Book I., and Vishnu Purana
  • (WG) Brahma Vach, the speech of Brahma, and hence Brahma male and female.
  • (TG) Brahma Vidya {Sans}. The knowledge, the esoteric science, about the two Brahmas and their true nature.
  • (KT) Brahm-Vidya {Sans} The knowledge or Esoteric Science about the true nature of the two Brahmas.
  • (WG) Brahma Vidya, the knowledge of or about Brahman; true knowledge — not literally, but in the sense that if of Brahman it must be true.
  • (TG) Brahma Viraj. {Sans}. The same: Brahma separating his body into two halves, male and female, creates in them Vach and Viraj. In plainer terms and esoterically, Brahma, the Universe, differentiating, produced thereby material nature, Viraj, and spiritual intelligent Nature, Vach — which is the Logos of Deity or the manifested expression of the eternal divine Ideation.
  • (WG) Brahma Viraj, almost the same as Brahma Vach ; it is Brahman differentiated into material unintelligent nature and into spiritual intelligent nature.
  • (TG) Brahmachari {Sans}. A Brahman ascetic; one vowed to celibacy, a monk, virtually, or a religious student.
  • (FY) Brahmachari, a Brahman ascetic.
  • (WG) Brahmacharin, an ascetic mendicant who lives under the direction of a spiritual Master and is vowed to celibacy and mendicancy.
  • (SKs) Brahmacharin One who follows a life of sacred study, a devotee of divine wisdom and learning. Brahmacharin is a compound of brahma — cosmic divinity, or divine wisdom; and charin — ‘one performing,’ derived from the verb-root char — to go along, to perform.
  • (WG) Brahmacharya, life of religious studentship and holiness.
  • (GH) Brahmacharya Following a life of philosophic and religious training — usually applicable to the first stage in the life of a Brahmana of ancient times, signifying the state of an unmarried religious student of the Vedas. (Compound Brahman, the Cosmic Spirit — in some cases meaning ‘spiritual wisdom’; charya, conduct). The person following this mode of life is called a Brahmacharin. ( Bhagavad-Gita, W. Q. Judge, p. 46)
  • (SKv) Brahmaivedam sarvam. Verily, all the Universe is Brahman. (Brahmaivedam is a compound of Brahma — the Universal Divinity, eva — verily, and idam — this, the manifested Universe; sarvam means ‘all.’)
  • (FY) Brahmagnani, one possessed of complete illumination.
  • (TG) Brahmajnani {Sans}. One possessed of complete Knowledge; an Illuminatus in esoteric parlance.
  • (TG) Brahman {Sans}. The highest of the four castes in India, one supposed or rather fancying himself, as high among, men, as Brahman, the ABSOLUTE of the Vedantins, is high among, or above the gods.
  • (FY) Brahman, the highest caste in India; Brahman, the absolute of the Vedantins.
  • (WG) Brahman, religious devotion, prayer; one who prays, a priest.
  • (OG) Brahman — {Sans} A word of which the root, brih, means “expansion.” It is that part of the celestial being which first initiates manifestation through the various Brahmas, the expansion of the one into the many. It is what is called the unmanifest Logos. It may also be called the impersonal and uncognizable principle of the universe, and must be sharply distinguished from the masculine Brahma of which there are many in a universe.
  • Note: In early theosophical literature, as well as in translations of the Hindu writings, Brahman is sometimes spelled Brahma or even Brahm; but this should not be confused with Brahma. ( See also Parabrahman, Brahma)
  • (GH) Brahman The impersonal and uncognizable Principle of the Universe, implying both the aspect of essential consciousness and that of substance: thus it represents the spiritual background of the Universe, the Cause of all Causes. “The student must distinguish between Brahma the neuter, and Brahma, the male creator of the Indian Pantheon. The former, Brahma or Brahman, is the impersonal, supreme and uncognizable Principle of the Universe from the essence of which all emanates, and into which all returns, which is incorporeal, immaterial, unborn, eternal, beginningless and endless. It is all-pervading, animating the highest god as well as the smallest mineral atom. Brahma, on the other hand, the male and the alleged Creator, exists periodically in his manifestation only, and then again goes into pralaya, i.e., disappears and is annihilated.” ( Theosophical Glossary, H. P. Blavatsky, p. 62)
  • (GH) Brahman is what is called in Theosophy the Unmanifest Logos: through and from It, therefore, arises Brahma . (The following word is derived from the verbal root:) brih, to expand, to grow. Bhagavad-Gita, W. Q. Judge, p. 58)
  • (SK)o Brahman (neuter) The loftiest Hierarch or Divinity of our Kosmos; the SELF, or the summit or the Absolute of this Galactic Universe. There are as many Brahmans or Divine Kosmic Hierarchs as there are Universes in Boundless Infinitude. Brahman is to the Universe what Atman or ‘the Divine Self’ is to man. When Brahman breathes forth, the manifold Brahmas or Selves or Hierarchs of the Solar Systems come into being. Brahman is derived from the verb-root brih — to expand; hence Brahman implies ‘expansion.’
  • (IN) Brahma(n) {Sans} The impersonal, absolute, ultimate reality; the unmanifest Logos.
  • (SP) Brahman — the impersonal absolute, or ultimate reality.
  • (TG) Brahmanas {Sans}. Hindu Sacred Books. Works composed by, and for Brahmans. Commentaries on those portions of the Vedas which were intended for the ritualistic use and guidance of the “twice-born” (Dwija) or Brahmans.
  • (WG) Brahmana, a class of prose works appended to the Vedas, as the Rig-Veda has the Aitareya-Brahmana and the Kaushitaka-Brahmana; the White Yajur-Veda has the Satapatha-Brahmana; the Black Yajur-Veda has the Taittiriya-Brahmana; the Sama-Veda has eight Brahmanas; and the Atharva-Veda has the Gopatha-Brahmana. They are esoteric keys to the ceremonial magic of the Vedas.
  • (OG) Brahmana — {Sans} A word having several meanings in Hindu sacred literature. Brahmana is both noun and adjective, as noun signifying a member of the first of the four Vedic classes, and as adjective signifying what belongs to a Brahmana or what is Brahmanical. Secondly, it signifies one of the portions of the Vedic literature, containing rules for the proper usage of the mantras or hymns at sacrifices, explanations in detail of what these sacrifices are, illustrated by legends and old stories.
  • Another adjective with closely similar meaning is Brahma. An old-fashioned English way of spelling Brahmana is Brahmin.
  • (GH) Brahmana (often Anglicized as BRAHMAN or BRAHMIN) The highest of the four castes into which the social classes of Hindusthan were divided in post-Vedic times. Originally a Brahmana was one who had been twice-born ( i.e., a dvija, or an initiate), but in decadent times the term came to be used simply as a hereditary prerogative, and hence applied to the members of the priestly caste. ( Bhagavad-Gita, W. Q. Judge, p. 127)
  • (SK)o Brahmana, Kshatriya, Vaisya, Sudra The Brahmanas, Kshatriyas, Vaisyas, and Sudras were the four castes of the early civilization of India. The Brahmanas are the priest-philosophers; the Kshatriyas, the warriors and ruling class; the Vaisyas, the agriculturists, merchants, and business men; the Sudras, the servants and laborers. In archaic times a man became a Brahmana, or verily a devotee of Brahman, by self-conquest, rather than by hereditary right as is the case today. Originally the caste-system referred to different disciplines followed by various types of men. The rigid caste-system based on blood-descent was a later and degraded development.
  • (SKv) Brahmana, Vaishnava, Saiva These three words are the adjectival forms of Brahma, Vishnu, and Siva. (For explanation of Brahmana The Vaishnavas and Saivas are names of two of the principal sects of modern Hinduism. The Vaishnavas worship Vishnu as their Supreme God, whereas the Saivas worship Siva as their greatest Lord.
  • (SP) Brahmana — a Brahmin, a member of the priestly class, the first of the four classes; or a Brahamana, a text of the second layer of the Veda.
  • (TG) Brahmana period {Sans}. One of the four periods into which Vedic literature has been divided by Orientalists.
  • (FY) Brahmana period, one of the four periods into which the Vedic literature has been divided.
  • (TG) Brahmanaspati {Sans}. The planet Jupiter; a deity in the Rig-Veda, known in the exoteric works as Brihaspati, whose wife Tara was carried away by Soma (the Moon). This led to a war between the gods and the Asuras.
  • (WG) Brahmanda, a macrocosm, the mundane egg; a division of infinite space containing the fourteen lokas. ( Brahma, the creator; anda, egg
  • (TG) Brahmarandhra {Sans}. A spot on the crown of the head connected by Sushumna, a cord in the spinal column, with the heart. A mystic term having its significance only in mysticism.
  • (WG) Brahma-randhra, an opening in the crown of the head through which the soul is said to escape at death. Nine openings of the human body are usually reckoned, the Brahma-randhra being the tenth. It is, however, in the right sense, an astral current and not a material place or opening. ( brahma, the Supreme, the Atma; randhra, an opening, any one of the openings of the human body
  • (TG) Brahmarshis {Sans}. The Brahminical Rishis.
  • (WG) Brahma-rishi, (also Brahmarshi), a priest-sage.
  • (SKs) Brahma-vidya ‘Divine-Wisdom.’ H. P. Blavatsky says in The Key to Theosophy, p. 2, that “Theosophy is the equivalent of the Sanskrit Brahma-Vidya, divine knowledge.”
  • (TG) Bread and Wine. Baptism and the Eucharist have their direct origin in pagan Egypt. There the “waters of purification” were used (the Mithraic font for baptism being borrowed by the Persians from the Egyptians) and so were bread and wine. “Wine in the Dionysiak cult, as in the Christian religion, represents that blood which in different senses is the life of the world” (Brown, in the Dionysiak Myth). Justin Martyr says, “In imitation of which the devil did the like in the Mysteries of Mithras, for you either know or may know that they also take bread and a cup of water in the sacrifices of these that are initiated and pronounce certain words over it “.
  • (TG) Briareus {Greek}. A famous giant in the Theogony of Hesiod. The son of Coelus and Terra, a monster with 50 heads and 100 arms. He is conspicuous in the wars and battles between the gods.
  • (TG) Briatic World or Briah {Hebr}. This world is the second of the Four worlds of the Kabbalists and referred to the highest created “Archangels”, or to Pure Spirits. [w.w.w.]
  • (TG) Bride. The tenth Sephira, Malkuth, is called by the Kabbalists the Bride of Microprosopus; she is the final He of the Tetragrammaton; in a similar manner the Christian Church is called the Bride of Christ. [w.w.w.]
  • (WG) Brih, prayer; expansion.
  • (TG) Brihadaranyaka {Sans}. The name of a Upanishad. One of the sacred and secret books of the Brahmins; an Aranyaka is a treatise appended to the Vedas, and considered a subject of special study by those who have retired to the jungle (forest) for purposes of religious meditation.
  • (FY) Brihadaranyaka Upanishad, one of the sacred books of the Brahmins; an Aranyaka is a treatise appended to the Vedas, and considered the subject of special study by those who have retired to the forest for purposes of religious meditation.
  • (TG) Brihaspati {Sans}. The name of a Deity, also of a Rishi. It is likewise the name of the planet Jupiter. He is the personified Guru and priest of the gods in India; also the symbol of exoteric ritualism as opposed to esoteric mysticism. Hence the opponent of King Soma — the moon, but also the sacred juice drunk at initiation — the parent of Budha, Secret Wisdom.
  • (WG) Brihaspati, the personification of exoteric ritualism; the planet Jupiter.
  • (GH) Brihaspati The deity who represents the worshiper of the gods: the suppliant and sacrificer, designated as the Purohita (family priest), because he intercedes with the gods on behalf of mankind, and likewise protects the righteous men from the wicked. He is often called the father of the gods because of his creative powers, and is named the shining one, the golden colored one. Brihaspati is also the regent of the planet Jupiter. The lengthy legend about his wife, Tara, being carried off by Soma, the moon, and the consequent war in heaven (the Tarakamaya) is related in The Secret Doctrine, (II, pp. 498-9) and is there interpreted, H. P. Blavatsky. (Compound brih, as noun, ‘prayer,’ from (The following word is derived from the verbal root:) brih, to grow great, to expand; pati lord. Bhagavad-Gita, W. Q. Judge, p. 74)
  • (WG) Brihat-saman, a sacred verse which is said to reveal the path to Nirvana.
  • (GH) Brihat-Saman The name of the hymns in the Sama-Veda, written in the Brihati meter, i.e., meters of 36 syllables (originally written 8-8-12-8). (Compound Brihat, the Brihati meter; Saman, a sacred verse to be sung. Bhagavad-Gita, W. Q. Judge, p. 76)
  • (MO) Brimer {Nors} (bree-mer) [ocean surf] An aspect of Ager. See Ymer
  • (TG) Briseus {Greek}. A name given to the god Bacchus from his nurse, Briso. He had also a temple at Brisa, a promontory of the isle of Lesbos.
  • (MO) Brisingamen {Nors} (bree-sing-a-mayn) [ brising fire + men jewel] Freya’s gem, human intelligence
  • (MO) Brock {Nors} A dwarf: the mineral kingdom
  • (TG) Brothers of the Shadow. A name given by the Occultists, to Sorcerers, and especially to the Tibetan Dugpas, of whom there are many in the Bhon sect of the Red Caps (Dugpa). The word is applied to all practitioners of black or left hand magic.
  • (WG) Brothers of the Shadow, the opposite of the Adepts of the white or unselfish school. Those of the shadow include all black magicians, sorcerers, and others who intelligently abuse occult powers for selfish ends. They are not only living in bodies, but are also still undestroyed or not yet disintegrated shades of former living beings who were magicians of the black school.
  • (OG) Brother(s) of the Shadow — A term given in occultism and especially in modern esotericism to individuals, whether men or women, who follow the path of the shadows, the left-hand path. The term “shadow” is a technical expression and signifies more than appears on the surface: i.e., the expression is not to be understood of individuals who live in actual physical obscurity or actual physical shadows, which literalism would be simply absurd; but applies to those who follow the path of matter, which from time immemorial in the esoteric schools in both Orient and Occident has frequently been called shadow or shadows. The term originally arose, without doubt, in the philosophical conception of the word maya, for in early Oriental esotericism maya, and more especially maha-maya, was a term applied in one of its many philosophical meanings to that which was contrary to and, indeed, in one sense a reflection of, light. Just as spirit may be considered to be pure energy, and matter, although essentially crystallized spirit, may be looked upon as the shadow world or vehicular world in which the energy or spirit or pure light works, just so is maya, as the garment or expression or sakti of the divine energy, the vehicle or shadow of the divine side of nature, in other words its negative or nether pole, as light is the upper or positive pole. The Brothers of the Shadow are therefore those who, being essentially of the nature of matter, instinctively choose and follow the path along which they are most strongly drawn, that is, the path of matter or of the shadows. When it is recollected that matter is but a generalizing term, and that what this term comprises actually includes an almost infinite number of degrees of increasing ethereality from the grossest physical substance, or absolute matter, up to the most ethereal or spiritualized substance, we immediately see the subtle logic of this technical term — shadows or, more fully, the Path of the Shadows, hence the Brothers of the Shadow. They are the so-called black magicians of the Occident, and stand in sharp and notable contrast with the white magicians or the Sons of Light who follow the pathway of self-renunciation, self-sacrifice, self-conquest, perfect self-control, and an expansion of the heart and mind and consciousness in love and service for all that lives. ( See also Right-hand Path) The existence and aims of the Brothers of the Shadow are essentially selfish. It is commonly, but erroneously, supposed that the Brothers of the Shadow are men and women always of unpleasant or displeasing personal appearance, and no greater error than this could possibly be made. Multitudes of human beings are unconsciously treading the path of the shadows and, in comparison with these multitudes, it is relatively only a few who self-consciously lead and guide with subtle and manifest intelligence this army of unsuspecting victims of maya. The Brothers of the Shadow are often highly intellectual men and women, frequently individuals with apparent great personal charm, and to the ordinary observer, judging from their conversation and daily works, are fully as well able to “quote scripture” as are the Angels of Light!
  • Brujo Spanish, the “black magician,” doomed to hell in Xibalba, the underworld. His nahual is the culebra. The elder of an earlier cycle of Maya prehistory.
  • (TG) Bubaste {Egyp}. A city in Egypt which was sacred to the cats, and where was their principal shrine. Many hundreds of thousands of cats were embalmed and buried in the grottoes of Beni-Hassan-el-Amar. The cat being a symbol of the moon was sacred to Isis, her goddess. It sees in the dark and its eyes have a phosphorescent lustre which frightens the night-birds of evil omen. The cat was also sacred to Bast, and thence called “the destroyer of the Sun’s (Osiris’) enemies”.
  • (TG) Buddha {Sans}. Lit., “The Enlightened”. The highest degree of knowledge. To become a Buddha one has to break through the bondage of sense and personality; to acquire a complete perception of the REAL SELF and learn not to separate it from all other selves; to learn by experience the utter unreality of all phenomena of the visible Kosmos foremost of all; to reach a complete detachment from all that is evanescent and finite, and live while yet on Earth in the immortal and the everlasting alone, in a supreme state of holiness.
  • (KT) Buddha {Sans} “The enlightened.” Generally known as the title of Gautama Buddha, the Prince of Kapilavastu, the founder of modern Buddhism. The highest degree of knowledge and holiness. To become a Buddha one has to break through the bondage of sense and personality; to acquire a complete perception of the real Self, and learn not to separate it from all the other Selves; to learn by experience the utter unreality of all phenomena, foremost of all the visible Kosmos; to attain a complete detachment from all that is evanescent and finite, and to live while yet on earth only in the immortal and everlasting.
  • (FY) Buddha, the founder of Buddhism; he was a royal prince, by name Siddhartha, son of Suddhodhana, king of the Sakyas, an Aryan tribe.
  • (VS) thou art Buddha (II 8) [[p. 26]] “Buddha” means “Enlightened.”
  • (VS) He [[ Buddha ]] preached on mount (II 16) [[p. 30]] All the Northern and Southern traditions agree in showing Buddha quitting his solitude as soon as he had resolved the problem of life i.e., received the inner enlightenment and teaching mankind publicly.
  • (WG) Buddha, a manifestation of the Supreme, the first Buddha being Avalokitesvara, from whom emanate the seven Dhyani-Buddhas (“Buddhas of contemplation”), who by the power of meditation create for themselves the celestial Bodhisattvas, who incarnate on earth at the beginning of each human cycle as men, and become human Bodhisattvas and finally terrestrial Buddhas, of whom there have been four, humanity being now in the fourth round.
  • (OG) Buddha — {Sans} The past participle of the root budh , meaning “to perceive,” “to become cognizant of,” also “to awaken,” and “to recover consciousness.” It signifies one who is spiritually awakened, no longer living “the living death” of ordinary men, but awakened to the spiritual influence from within or from “above.” When man has awakened from the living death in which ordinary mortals live, when he has cast off the toils of both mind and flesh and, to use the old Christian term, has put on the garments of eternity, then he has awakened, he is a buddha. He has become one with — not “absorbed” as is constantly translated but has become one with — the Self of selves, with the paramatman, the Supreme Self. ( See also Bodhi, Buddhi)
  • A buddha in the esoteric teaching is one whose higher principles can learn nothing more in this manvantara; they have reached nirvana and remain there. This does not mean, however, that the lower centers of consciousness of a buddha are in nirvana, for the contrary is true; and it is this fact that enables a Buddha of Compassion to remain in the lower realms of being as mankind’s supreme guide and instructor, living usually as a nirmanakaya.
  • (SK)o Buddha, Gautama, Siddhartha The word Buddha literally means ‘the enlightened,’ the past participle form of the verb-root budh — to know, to enlighten. A Buddha is one who has reached the highest state of spiritual enlightenment possible for a human being in this Age. Gautama the Buddha the greatest spiritual sages known to history. Legend says his very name bespeaks his glory, for the word Gautama is sometimes interpreted to mean ‘highest on earth’: from gau on earth, and tama , a superlative suffix. Because he attained the goal of human perfection on earth he was called Siddhartha, or gone who has accomplished his purpose,’ from siddha, the past participle form of sidh — to attain, and artha — goal or purpose.
  • (SP) Buddha — enlightened or awakened one.
  • (SK) Buddham saranam gachchhami ; Dharmam saranam gachchhami ; Samgham saranam gachchhami.
  • I go to the Buddha as my refuge; I go to the Light of the Law as my refuge; I go to the Order of Holy Ones as my refuge.
  • (TG) Buddhachhaya {Sans}. Lit., “the shadow of Buddha”. It is said to become visible at certain great events, and during some imposing ceremonies performed at Temples in commemoration of glorious acts of Buddha’s life. Hiouen-tseng, the Chinese traveller, names a certain cave where it occasionally appears on the wall, but adds that only he “whose mind is perfectly pure”, can see it.
  • (TG) Buddhaphala {Sans}. Lit., “the fruit of Buddha”, the fruition of Arahattvaphala, or Arhatship.
  • (TG) Buddha Siddharta {Sans}. The name given to Gautama, the Prince of Kapilavastu, at his birth. It is an abbreviation of Sarvartthasiddha and means, the “realization of all desires”. Gautama, which means, “on earth (gau) the most victorious (tama) ” was the sacerdotal name of the Sakya family, the kingly patronymic of the dynasty to which the father of Gautama, the King Suddhodhana of Kapilavastu, belonged. Kapilavastu was an ancient city, the birth-place of the Great Reformer and was destroyed during his life time. In the title Sakyarmuni, the last Component, muni, is rendered as meaning one “mighty in charity, isolation and silence”, and the former Sakya is the family name. Every Orientalist or Pundit knows by heart the story of Gautama, the Buddha, the most perfect of mortal men that the world has ever seen, but none of them seem to suspect the esoteric meaning underling his prenatal biography, i.e ., the significance of the popular story. The Lalitavistara tells the tale, but abstains from hinting at the truth. The 5,000 Jatakas, or the events of former births (re-incarnations) are taken literally instead of esoterically. Gautama, the Buddha, would not have been a mortal man, had he not passed through hundreds and thousands of births previous to his last. Yet the detailed account of these, and the statement that during them he worked his way up through every stage of transmigration from the lowest animate and inanimate atom and insect, up to the highest — or man, contains simply the well-known occult aphorism: “a stone becomes a plant, a plant an animal, and an animal a man”. Every human being who has ever existed, has passed through the same evolution. But the hidden symbolism in the sequence of these re-births (jataka) contains a perfect history of the evolution on this earth, pre and post human, and is a scientific exposition of natural facts. One truth not veiled but bare and open is found in their nomenclature, viz ., that as soon as Gautama had reached the human form he began exhibiting in every personality the utmost unselfishness, self-sacrifice and charity. Buddha Gautama, the fourth of the Sapta (Seven) Buddhas and Sapta Tathagatas, was born according to Chinese Chronology in 1024 B.C.; but according to the Singhalese chronicles, on the 8th day of the second (or fourth) moon in the year 621 before our era. He fled from his father’s palace to become an ascetic on the night of the 8th day of the second moon, 597 B.C., and having passed six years in ascetic meditation at Gaya, and perceiving that physical self-torture was useless to bring enlightenment, he decided upon striking out a new path, until he reached the state Bodhi. He became a full Buddha on the night of the 8th day of the twelfth moon, in the year 592, and finally entered Nirvana in the year 543, according to Southern Buddhism. The Orientalists, however, have decided upon several other dates. All the rest is allegorical. He attained the state of Bodhisattva on earth when in the personality called Prabhapala. Tushita stands for a place on this globe, not for a paradise in the invisible regions. The selection of the Sakya family and his mother Maya, as “the purest on earth,” is in accordance with the model of the nativity of every Saviour, God or deified Reformer. The tale about his entering his mother’s bosom in the shape of a white elephant is an allusion to his innate Wisdom, the elephant of that colour being a symbol of every Bodhisattva. The statements that at Gautama’s birth, the newly born babe walked seven steps in four directions, that an Udumbara flower bloomed in all its rare beauty and that the Naga kings forthwith proceeded ” to baptise him “, are all so many allegories in the phraseology of the Initiates and well-understood by every Eastern Occultist. The whole events of his noble life are given in occult numbers, and every so-called miraculous event — so deplored by Orientalists as confusing the narrative and making it impossible to extricate truth from fiction — is simply the allegorical veiling of the truth. It is as comprehensible to an Occultist learned in symbolism, as it is difficult to understand for a European scholar ignorant of Occultism. Every detail of the narrative after his death and before cremation is a chapter of facts written in a language which must be studied before it is understood, otherwise its dead letter will lead one into absurd contradictions. For instance, having reminded his disciples of the immortality of Dharmakaya, Buddha is said to have passed into Samadhi, and lost himself in Nirvana — from which none can return. And yet, notwithstanding this, the Buddha is shown bursting open the lid of the coffin, and stepping out of it; salut-ing with folded hands his mother Maya who had suddenly appeared in the air, though she had died seven days after his birth,, As Buddha was a Chakravartti (he who turns the wheel of the Law), his body at its cremation could not be consumed by common fire. What happens? Suddenly a jet of flame burst out of the Svastica on his breast, and reduced his body to ashes. Space prevents giving more instances. As to his being one of the true and undeniable SAVIOURS of the World, suffice it to say that the most rabid Orthodox missionary, unless he is hopelessly insane, or has not the least regard even for historical truth, cannot find one smallest accusation against the life and personal character of Gautama, the “Buddha”. Without any claim to divinity, allowing his followers to fall into atheism, rather than into the degrading superstition of deva or idol-worship, his walk in life is from the beginning to the end, holy and divine. During the 45 years of his mission it is blameless and pure as that of a god — or as the latter should be. He is a perfect example of a divine, godly man. He reached Buddhaship — i.e ., complete enlightenment — entirely by his own merit and owing to his own individual exertions, no god being supposed to have any personal merit in the exercise of goodness and holiness. Esoteric teachings claim that he renounced Nirvana and gave up the Dharmakaya vesture to remain a “Buddha of compassion” within the reach of the miseries of this world. And the religious philosophy he left to it has produced for over 2,000 years generations of good and unselfish men. His is the only, absolutely bloodless religion among all the existing religions: tolerant and liberal, teaching universal compassion and charity, love and self-sacrifice, poverty and contentment with one’s lot, whatever it may be. No persecutions, and enforcement, of faith by fire and sword, have ever disgraced it. No the thunder-and-lightning-vomiting, god likes interfered with its chaste commandments; and if the simple, humane and philosophical code of daily life left to us by the greatest Man-Reformer ever known, should ever come to be adopted by mankind at large, then indeed an era of bliss and peace would dawn on Humanity.
  • (VS) Buddha of Compassion (III 34) [[p. 71]] This same popular reverence calls “Buddhas of Compassion” those Bodhisattvas who, having reached the rank of an Arhat ( i.e., having completed the fourth or seventh Path), refuse to pass into the Nirvanic state or “don the Dharmakaya robe and cross to the other shore,” as it would then become beyond their power to assist men even so little as Karma permits. They prefer to remain invisibly (in Spirit, so to speak) in the world, and contribute toward man’s salvation by influencing them to follow the Good Law, i.e., lead them on the Path of Righteousness. It is part of the exoteric Northern Buddhism to honour all such great characters as Saints, and to offer even prayers to them, as the Greeks and Catholics do to their Saints and Patrons; on the other hand, the esoteric teachings countenance no such thing. There is a great difference between the two teachings. The exoteric layman hardly knows the real meaning of the word Nirmanakaya hence the confusion and inadequate explanations of the Orientalists. For example Schlagintweit believes that Nirmanakaya -body, means the physical form assumed by the Buddhas when they incarnate on earth “the least sublime of their earthly encumbrances” (vide “Buddhism in Tibet”) and he proceeds to give an entirely false view on the subject. The real teaching is, however, this:
  • The three Buddhic bodies or forms are styled:
  • 1. Nirmanakaya . 2. Sambhogakaya . 3. Dharmakaya .
  • The first is that ethereal form which one would assume when leaving his physical he would appear in his astral body having in addition all the knowledge of an Adept. The Bodhisattva develops it in himself as he proceeds on the Path. Having reached the goal and refused its fruition, he remains on Earth, as an Adept; and when he dies, instead of going into Nirvana, he remains in that glorious body he has woven for himself, invisible to uninitiated mankind, to watch over and protect it.
  • Sambhogakaya is the same, but with the additional lustre of “three perfections,” one of which is entire obliteration of all earthly concerns.
  • The Dharmakaya body is that of a complete Buddha, i.e., no body at all, but an ideal breath: Consciousness merged in the Universal Consciousness, or Soul devoid of every attribute. Once a Dharmakaya, an Adept or Buddha leaves behind every possible relation with, or thought for this earth. Thus, to be enabled to help humanity, an Adept who has won the right to Nirvana, “renounces the Dharmakaya body” in mystic parlance; keeps, of the Sambhogakaya, only the great and complete knowledge, and remains in his Nirmanakaya body. The esoteric school teaches that Gautama Buddha with several of his Arhats is such a Nirmanakaya, higher than whom, on account of the great renunciation and sacrifice to mankind there is none known.
  • (VS) Nirvana-Dharma is entered not by all the Buddhas (III 32) [[p. 70]] In the Northern Buddhist phraseology all the great Arhats, Adepts and Saints are called Buddhas.
  • (OG) Buddha(s) of Compassion — One who, having won all, gained all — gained the right to kosmic peace and bliss — renounces it so that he may return as a Son of Light in order to help humanity, and indeed all that is.
  • The Buddhas of Compassion are the noblest flowers of the human race. They are men who have raised themselves from humanity into quasi-divinity; and this is done by letting the light imprisoned within, the light of the inner god, pour forth and manifest itself through the humanity of the man, through the human soul of the man. Through sacrifice and abandoning of all that is mean and wrong, ignoble and paltry and selfish; through opening up the inner nature so that the god within may shine forth; in other words, through self-directed evolution, they have raised themselves from mere manhood into becoming god-men, man-gods — human divinities.
  • They are called Buddhas of Compassion because they feel their unity with all that is, and therefore feel intimate magnetic sympathy with all that is, and this is more and more the case as they evolve, until finally their consciousness blends with that of the universe and lives eternally and immortally, because it is at one with the universe. “The dewdrop slips into the shining sea” — its origin.
  • Feeling the urge of almighty love in their hearts, the Buddhas of Compassion advance forever steadily towards still greater heights of spiritual achievement; and the reason is that they have become the vehicles of universal love and universal wisdom. As impersonal love is universal, their whole nature expands consequently with the universal powers that are working through them. The Buddhas of Compassion, existing in their various degrees of evolution, form a sublime hierarchy extending from the Silent Watcher on our planet downwards through these various degrees unto themselves, and even beyond themselves to their chelas or disciples. Spiritually and mystically they contrast strongly with what Asiatic occultism, through the medium of Buddhism, has called the Pratyeka Buddhas.
  • (TG) Buddhi {Sans}. Universal Soul or Mind. Mahabuddhi is a name of Mahat (see “Alaya”); also the spiritual Soul in man (the sixth principle), the vehicle of Atma, exoterically the seventh.
  • (KT) Buddhi {Sans} Universal Soul or Mind. Mahabuddhi is a name of Mahat also the Spiritual Soul in man (the sixth principle exoterically), the vehicle of Atma, the seventh, according to the exoteric enumeration.
  • (FY) Buddhi, the spiritual Ego.
  • (WG) Buddhi, intelligence; in the Sankhya philosophy, intellect as the second tattva, coming next to and proceeding from mulaprakriti or avyakta; the passive spiritual vehicle, or latent ideation, of Atma, serving to connect it with manas, the individual
  • (WG) Buddhi, the sixth “principle” of man’s sevenfold constitution.
  • (OG) Buddhi — {Sans} Buddhi comes from a Sanskrit root budh , commonly translated “to enlighten,” but a better translation is “to perceive,” “to cognize,” “to recover consciousness,” hence “to awaken,” and therefore “to understand.” The second counting downwards, or the sixth counting upwards, of the seven principles of man. Buddhi is the principle or organ in man which gives to him spiritual consciousness, and is the vehicle of the most high part of man — the atman — the faculty which manifests as understanding, judgment, discrimination, an inseparable veil or garment of the atman.
  • From another point of view, buddhi may truly be said to be both the seed and the fruit of manas.
  • Man’s ordinary consciousness in life in his present stage of evolution is almost wholly in the lower or intermediate duad (manas-kama) of his constitution; when he raises his consciousness through personal effort to become permanently one with the higher duad (atma-buddhi), he becomes a mahatma, a master. At the death of the human being, this higher duad carries away with it all the spiritual essence, all the spiritual and intellectual aroma, of the lower or intermediate duad. Maha-buddhi is one of the names given to the kosmic principle mahat. ( See also Alaya)
  • (GH) Buddhi The sixth principle in the Theosophical classification of man’s component parts. As the vehicle for Universal Spirit, Buddhi is inseparably linked with Atman and regarded as its vehicle. It is the channel for the divine inspiration which streams from Atman, as well as the faculty of discrimination, and the knowledge of discrimination between good and evil, hence spiritual consciousness. When awakened in man the Buddhic principle evokes compassionate love for all, instant understanding, and intuition. A man so fully awakened is termed a Buddha.
  • “. . . the Spiritual Soul (Buddhi) . . . conceals a mystery which is never given to any one, with the exception of irrevocably pledged chelas,” (The Key to Theosophy, pp. 119-20). (The following word is derived from the verbal root:) budh, to awaken, to enlighten. Bhagavad-Gita, W. Q. Judge, p. 28)
  • (SK)o Buddhi The Spiritual Soul of man; the channel through which Atman may send its divine inspirations to the Human Ego. A man in whom the Buddhi is awakened shines with the qualities of discrimination, intuition, spiritual vision, love without bounds, and compassion. Buddhi comes from the verb-root budh, ‘to know,’ ‘to enlighten.’
  • (IN) Buddhi {Sans} fr budh, “to wake up”) Human spiritual soul, principle of intuitive knowledge.
  • (SP) Buddhi — higher intelligence.
  • (TG) Buddhism. Buddhism is now split into two distinct Churches: the Southern and the Northern Church. The former is said to be the purer form, as having preserved more religiously the original teachings of the Lord Buddha. It is the religion of Ceylon, Siam, Burmah and other places, while Northern Buddhism is confined to Tibet, China and Nepaul. Such a distinction, however, is incorrect. If the Southern Church is nearer, in that it has not departed, except perhaps in some trifling dogmas due to the many councils held after the death of the MASTER, from the public or exoteric teachings of Sakyamuni — the Northern Church is the outcome of Siddharta Buddha’s esoteric teachings which he confined to his elect Bhikshus and Arhats. In fact, Buddhism in the present age, cannot be justly judged either by one or the other of its exoteric popular forms. Real Buddhism can be appreciated only by blending the philosophy of the Southern Church and the metaphysics of the Northern Schools. If one seems too iconoclastic and stern, and the other too metaphysical and transcendental, even to being overgrown with the weeds of Indian exotericism — many of the gods of its Pantheon having been transplanted under new names to Tibetan soil — it is entirely due to the popular expression of Buddhism in both Churches. Correspondentially they stand in their relation to each other as Protestantism to Roman Catholicism. Both err by an excess of zeal and erroneous interpretations, though neither the Southern nor the Northern Buddhist clergy have ever departed from truth consciously, still less have they acted tinder the dictates, of priestocracy, ambition, or with an eye to personal gain and power, as the two Christian Churches have.
  • (KT) Buddhism is the religious philosophy taught by Gautama Buddha. It is now split into two distinct churches: the Southern and Northern. The former is said to be the purer, as having preserved more religiously the original teachings of the Lord Buddha. The Northern Buddhism is confined to Thibet, China, and Nepaul. But this distinction is incorrect. If the Southern Church is nearer, and has not, in fact, departed, except perhaps in trifling dogmas, due to the many councils held after the death of the MASTER from the public or exoteric teachings of Sakyamuni, the Northern Church is the outcome of Siddharta Buddha’s esoteric teachings which he confined to his elect Bikshus and Arhats. Buddhism, in fact, cannot be justly judged in our age either by one or the other of its exoteric popular forms. Real Buddhism can be appreciated only by blending the philosophy of the Southern Church and the metaphysics of the Northern Schools. If one seems too iconoclastic and stern, and the other too metaphysical and transcendental, events being overcharged with the weeds of Indian exotericism — many of the gods of its Pantheon having been transplanted under new names into Thibetan soil — it is due to the popular expression of Buddhism in both churches. Correspondentially, they stand in their relation to each other as Protestantism to Roman Catholicism. Both err by an excess of zeal and erroneous interpretations, though neither the Southern nor the Northern Buddhist clergy have ever departed from Truth consciously, still less have they acted under the dictates of priestocracy, ambition, or an eye to personal gain and power, as the later churches have.
  • (OG) Buddhism — The teachings of Gautama the Buddha. Buddhism today is divided into two branches, the Northern and the Southern. The Southern still retains the teachings of the “Buddha’s brain,” the “eye doctrine,” that is to say his outer philosophy for the general world, sometimes inadequately called the doctrine of forms and ceremonies. The Northern still retains his “heart doctrine” — that which is hid, the inner life, the heart-blood, of the religion: the doctrine of the inner heart of the teaching.
  • The religious philosophy of the Buddha-Sakyamuni is incomparably nearer to the ancient wisdom, the esoteric philosophy of the archaic ages, than is Christianity. Its main fault today is that teachers later than the Buddha himself carried its doctrines too far along merely formal or exoteric lines; yet, with all that, to this day it remains the purest and holiest of the exoteric religions on earth, and its teachings even exoterically are true — once they are properly understood. They need but the esoteric key in interpretation of them. As a matter of fact, the same may be said of all the great ancient world religions. Christianity, Brahmanism, Taoism, and others all have the same esoteric wisdom behind the outward veil of the exoteric formal faith.
  • (SKf) Buddhism, Budhism Buddhism is that system of teaching given forth by Gautama the Buddha. Budhism is ‘Wisdom’ or Theosophy. Both these words are derived from the verb-root budh — to enlighten, to know; but Budha means ‘a wise man,’ and Buddha, the past participle-form of budh, means ‘enlightened’; hence Budha-ism is the teachings of the Wise Ones of the Ages, while Buddha-ism is the teachings of Gautama the Buddha. The esoteric and deeper portions of Buddhism, as also of Christianity, are Budhism or Theosophy.
  • (KT) Buddhi-Taijasi {Sans} A very mystic term, capable of several interpretations. In Occultism, however, and in relation to the human “Principles” (exoterically), it is a term to express the state of our dual Manas, when, reunited during a man’s life, it bathes in the radiance of Buddhi, the Spiritual Soul. For “Taijasi” means the radiant, and Manas, becoming radiant in consequence of its union with Buddhi, and being, so to speak, merged into it, is identified with the latter; the trinity has become one; and, as the element of Buddhi is the highest, it becomes Buddhi-Taijasi. In short, it is the human soul illuminated by the radiance of the divine soul, the human reason lit by the light of the Spirit or Divine SELF-CONSCIOUSNESS.
  • (TG) Buddhochinga {Sans}. The name of a great Indian Arhat who went to China in the 4th century to propagate Buddhism and converted masses of people by means of miracles and most wonderful magic feats.
  • (TG) Budha {Sans}. “The Wise and Intelligent”, the Son of Soma, the Moon, and of Rokini or Taraka, wife of Brihaspati carried away by King Soma, thus leading to the great war between the Asuras, who sided with the Moon, and the Gods who took the defence of Brihaspati (Jupiter) who was their Purohita (family priest). This war is known as the Tarakamaya. It is the original of the war in Olympus between the Gods and the Titans and also of the war (in Revelation) between Michael (Indra) and the Dragon (personifying the Asuras).
  • (WG) Budha, awake, intelligent, wise; the planet Mercury.
  • (MO) Budlung {Nors} (bood-lung) A king (poetic)
  • (TG) Bull-Worship (See “Apis”). The worship of the Bull and the Ram was addressed to one and the same power, that of generative creation, under two aspects — the celestial or cosmic, and the terrestrial or human. The ram-headed gods all belong to the latter aspect, the bull — to the former. Osiris to whom the hull was sacred, was never regarded as a phallic deity; neither was Siva with his Bull Nandi, in spite of the lingham. As Nandi is of a pure white colour, so was Apis. Both were the emblems of the generative, or of evolutionary power in the Universal Kosmos. Those who regard the solar god and the bulls as of a phallic character, or connect the Suit with it, are mistaken. It is only the lunar gods and the rains, and lambs, which are priapic, and it little becomes a religion which, however unconsciously, has still adopted for its worship a god pre-eminently lunar, and accentuated its choice by the selection of the lamb, whose sire is the ram, a glyph as pre-eminently phallic, for its most sacred symbol — to vilify the older religions for using the same symbolism. The worship of the bull, Apis, Hati Ankh, or the living Osiris, ceased over 3,000 years ago: the worship of the ram and lamb continues to this day. Mariette Bey discovered the Serapeum, the Necropolis of the Apis-bulls, near Memphis, an imposing subterranean crypt 2,000 feet long and twenty feet wide, containing the mummies of thirty sacred bulls. If 1,000 years hence, a Roman Catholic Cathedral with the Easter lamb in it, were discovered under the ashes of Vesuvius or Etna, would future generations be justified in inferring therefrom that Christians were “lamb” and “dove” worshippers? Yet the two symbols would give them as much right in the one case as in the other. Moreover, not all of the sacred bulls were phallic, i.e ., males; there were hermaphrodite and sexless bulls The black bull Mnevis, the son of Ptah, was sacred to the God Ra at Heliopolis; the Pacis of Hermonthis — to Amoun Horus,,, and Apis himself was a hermaphrodite and not male animal, which shows his cosmic character. As well call the Taurus of the Zodiac and all Nature phallic.
  • (TG) Bumapa {Tibe}. A school of men, usually a college of mystic students.
  • (TG) Bunda-hish. An old Eastern work in which among other things anthropology is treated in an allegorical fashion.
  • (MO) Bur {Nors} (boo-r) [birth?] Space, first emanation of Buri
  • (TG) Burham-i-Kati. A Hermetic Eastern work.
  • (TG) Buri {Nors}. “The producer”, the Son of Bestla, in Norse legends.
  • (MO) Buri {Nors} (boo-ree) Frozen, unmanifest, abstract Space. Traditionally King Buri or Bore personifies winter
  • (TG) Buru Bonga. The “Spirit of the Hills”. This Dryadic deity is worshipped by the Kolarian tribes of Central India with great ceremonies and magical display. There are mysteries connected with it, but the people are very jealous and will admit no stranger to their rites.
  • (FY) Buru Bonga, spirit of the hills worshipped by the Kolarian tribes of Central India.
  • (TG) Busardier. A Hermetic philosopher born in Bohemia who is credited with having made a genuine power o f projection He left the bulk of his red powder to a friend named Richthausen, an adept and alchemist of Vienna. Some years after Busardier’s death, in 1637, Richthausen introduced himself to the Emperor Ferdinand III, who is known to have been ardently devoted to alchemy, and together they are said to have converted three pounds of mercury into the finest gold with one single grain of Busardier’s powder. In 1658, the Elector of Mayence also was permitted to test the powder, and the gold produced with it was declared by the Master of the Mint to be such, that he had never seen finer. Such are the claims vouchsafed by the city records and chronicles.
  • (TG) Butler. An English name assumed by an adept, a disciple of some Eastern Sages, of whom many fanciful stories are current. It is said for instance, that Butler was captured during his travels in 1629, and sold into captivity. He became the slave of an Arabian philosopher, a great alchemist, and finally escaped, robbing his Master of a large quantity of red powder. According to more trustworthy records, only the last portion of this story is true. Adepts who can he robbed without knowing it would be unworthy of the name. Butler or rather the person who assumed this name, robbed his “Master” (whose free disciple he was) of the secret of transmutation, and abused of his knowledge- i.e ., sought to turn it to his personal profit, but was speedily punished for it. After performing many wonderful cures by means of his “stone” (i.e., the occult knowledge of an initiated adept), and producing extraordinary phenomena, to some of which Val Helmont, the famous Occultist and Rosicrucian, was witness, not for the benefit of men but his own vain glory, Butler was imprisoned in the Castle of Viloord, in Flanders, and passed almost the whole of his life in confinement. He lost his powers and died miserable and unknown. Such is the fate of every Occultist who abuses his power or desecrates the sacred science.
  • (MO) Byleist {Nors} (bee-layst) [wildfire] The destructive side of Loki, mind
  • (TG) Bythos {Greek}. A Gnostic term meaning “Depth” or the “great Deep”, Chaos. It is equivalent to space, before anything had formed itself in it from the primordial atoms that exist eternally in its spatial depths, according to the teachings of Occultism.
  • (WG) Bythos, the abyss, or chaos, — a Gnostic term.
  • (TG) C. — The third letter of the English alphabet, which has no equivalent in Hebrew except Caph, which see under K.
  • (PV) Cabahuil {quiche-maya} “Heart of Heaven (and of Earth)”; god-Seven or the Creator deity, having six hypostases; integrated by the three suns of the line of parallel (rising, at zenith, setting). Equated with god B of the Mayan codices. Corresponds to the sun at zenith
  • (PV) Caban {quiche-maya} Earth. As a goddess, a hypostasis of Hunrakan; as a cosmic plane, an unfoldment or reflection of the celestial or heavenly plane. The fertility of, likened to human fecundation. The four giants of the Popol Vuh personify the forces of Earth.
  • (TG) Cabar Zio {Gnos} “The mighty Lord of Splendour” (Codex Nazaraeus), they who procreate seven beneficent lives, “who shine in their own form and light” to counteract the influence of the seven “badly-disposed” stellars or principles. These are the progeny of Karabtanos, the personification of concupiscence and matter. The latter are the seven physical planets, the former, their genii or Rulers.
  • (TG) Cabeiri or Kabiri {Phoen}. Deities, held in the highest veneration at Thebes, in Lemnos, Phrygia, Macedonia, and especially at Samothrace. They were mystery gods, no profane having the right to name or speak of them. Herodotus makes of them Fire-gods and points to Vulcan as their father. The Kabiri presided over the Mysteries, and their real number has never been revealed, their occult meaning being very sacred.
  • (TG) Cabletow A Masonic term for a certain object used in the Lodges. Its origin lies in the thread of the Brahman ascetics, a thread which is also used for magical purposes in Tibet.
  • (TG) Cadmus {Greek}. The supposed inventor of the letters of the alphabet. He may have been their originator and teacher in Europe and Asia Minor; but in India the letters were known and used by the Initiates ages before him.
  • (TG) Caduceus {Greek}. The Greek poets and mythologists took the idea of the Caduceus of Mercury from the Egyptians. The Caduceus is found as two serpents twisted round a rod, on Egyptian monuments built before Osiris. The Greeks altered this. We find it again in the hands of AEsculapius assuming a different form to the wand of Mercurius or Hermes. It is a cosmic, sidereal or astronomical, as well as a spiritual and even physiological symbol, its significance changing with its application. Metaphysically, the Caduceus represents the fall of primeval and primordial matter into gross terrestrial matter, the one Reality becoming Illusion. (See Sect. Astronomically, the head and tail represent the points of the ecliptic where the planets and even the sun and moon meet in close embrace. Physiologically, it is the symbol of the restoration of the equilibrium lost between Life, as a unit, and the currents of life performing various functions in the human body.
  • (WG) Caduceus (Greek), the rod of Mercury, consisting of two serpents twined about a staff. Sometimes the staff also terminates in the head of a serpent.
  • (TG) Caesar. A far-famed astrologer and “professor of magic,” i.e., an Occultist, during the reign of Henry IV. of France. “He was reputed to have been strangled by the devil in 1611,” as Brother Kenneth Mackenzie tells us.
  • (TG) Cagliostro. A famous Adept, whose real name is claimed (by his enemies) to have been Joseph Balsamo. He was a native of Palermo, and studied under some mysterious foreigner of whom little has been ascertained. His accepted history is too well known to need repetition, and his real history has never been told. His fate was that of every human being who proves that he knows more than do his fellow-creatures; he was “stoned to death” by persecutions, lies, and infamous accusations, and yet he was the friend and adviser of the highest and mightiest of every land he visited. He was finally tried and sentenced in Rome as a heretic, and was said to have died during his confinement in a State prison. (See Yet his end was not utterly undeserved, as he had been untrue to his vows in some respects, had fallen from his state of chastity and yielded to ambition and selfishness.
  • (TG) Cain or Kayn {Hebr}. In Esoteric symbology he is said to be identical with Jehovah or the “Lord God” of the fourth chapter of Genesis. It is held, moreover, that Abel is not his brother, but his female aspect. (See Sec. Doct., sub voce. )
  • (PV) Cajolom {quiche-maya} One of six hypostases of Cabahuil, or god-Seven. Especially associated with the three other hypostases: Tzakol, Bitol, and Alom; these four are regent gods of the 4 cosmic angles; their mediation produces light.
  • (TG) Calvary Cross. This form of cross does not date from Christianity. It was known and used for mystical purposes, thousands of years before our era. It formed part and parcel of the various Rituals, in Egypt and Greece, in Babylon and India, as well as in China, Mexico, and Peru. It is a cosmic, as well as a physiological (or phallic ) symbol. That it existed among all the “heathen” nations is testified to by Tertullian. “How doth the Athenian Minerva differ from the body of a cross?” he queries. “The origin of your gods is derived from figures moulded on a cross. All those rows of images on your standards are the appendages of crosses; those hangings on your banners are the robes of crosses.” And the fiery champion was right. The tau or [diagram]] symbol without serifs and equal horizontal and vertical lines] is the most ancient of all forms, and the cross or the tat as ancient. The crux ansata, the cross with a handle, is in the hands of almost every god, including Baal and the Phoenician Astarte. The croix cramponnee is the Indian Swastica. It has been exhumed from the lowest foundations of the ancient site of Troy, and it appears on Etruscan and Chaldean relics of antiquity. As Mrs. Jamieson shows “The ankh of Egypt was the crutch of St. Anthony and the cross of St. Philip. The Labarum of Constantine . . . was an emblem long before, in Etruria. Osiris had the Labarum for his sign; Horus appears sometimes with the long Latin cross. The Greek pectoral cross is Egyptian. It was called by the Fathers ‘the devil’s invention before Christ’. The crux ansata is upon the old coins of Tarsus, as the Maltese upon the breast of an Assyrian king. . . . The cross of Calvary, so common in Europe, occurs on the breasts of mummies. . . . It was suspended round the necks of sacred Serpents in Egypt. . . . Strange Asiatic tribes bringing tribute in Egypt are noticed with garments studded with crosses, and Sir Gardner Wilkinson dates this picture B.C., 1500.” Finally, “Typhon, the Evil One, is chained by a cross!” (Eg. Belief and Mod. Thought).
  • (PV) Came, Vukup {quiche-maya} “Seven Death.” A sevenfold entity (Hun Came) of false gods, Lords of Xibalba, the underworld. Antagonists of Vucup Hunahpu, the true gods, whom the Came challenge to a ball game in Xibalba where they defeat the Seven Ahpu and behead them. The Came are later vanquished by Hunahpu and Ixbalamque, the divine twins who are the offspring of the Seven Ahpu, for the deliverance of mankind from thralldom.
  • (PV) Came, Hun {quiche-maya} “One Death.” Lord of Xibalba, the equivalent of Cimi, the Second Regent in the Maya primary calendric series of regents or Ahau; assumes the regency from Ixmucane. God of Death.
  • (TG) Campanella, Tomaso. A Calabrese, born in 1568, who, from his childhood exhibited strange powers, and gave himself up during his whole life to the Occult Arts. The story which shows him initiated in his boyhood into the secrets of alchemy and thoroughly instructed in the secret science by a Rabbi-Kabbalist in a fortnight by means of notaricon, is a cock and bull invention. Occult knowledge, even when a heirloom from the preceding birth, does not come back into a new personality within fifteen days. He became an opponent of the Aristotelian materialistic philosophy when at Naples and was obliged to fly for his life. Later, the Inquisition sought to try and condemn him for the practice of magic arts, but its efforts were defeated. During his lifetime he wrote an enormous quantity of magical, astrological and alchemical works, most of which are no longer extant. He is reported to have died in the convent of the Jacobins at Paris on May the 21st, 1639.
  • (TG) Canarese. The language of the Karnatic, originally called Kanara, one of the divisions of South India.
  • (FY) Canarese, one of the Dravidian tongues, spoken in Southern India.
  • (PV) Caprakan {quiche-maya} “He of two feet.” The theogonic antithesis of Hunrakan, son of Vukup Cakix and his wife, Chimalmat, and brother of Zipacna. With these three, one of the four primeval giants of the Popol Vuh who are vanquished by Hunahpu and Ixbalamque in the Third Age and become transformed into the four “world pillars.” God of earthquakes, associated with his brother, Zipacna.
  • (TG) Capricornus {Latin}. The 10th sign of the Zodiac ( Makara in Sanskrit), considered, on account of its hidden meaning, the most important among the constellations of the mysterious Zodiac. It is fully described in the Secret Doctrine, and therefore needs but a few words more. Whether, agreeably with exoteric statements, Capricornus was related in any way to the wet-nurse Amalthaea who fed Jupiter with her milk, or whether it was the god Pan who changed himself into a goat and left his impress upon the sidereal records, matters little. Each of the fables has its significance. Everything in Nature is intimately correlated to the rest, and therefore the students of ancient lore will not be too much surprised when told that even the seven steps taken in the direction of every one of the four points of the compass, or — 28 steps — taken by the new-born infant Buddha, are closely related to the 28 stars of the constellation of Capricornus.
  • (TG) Cardan, Jerome. An astrologer, alchemist, kabbalist and mystic, well known in literature. He was born at Pavia in 1501, and died at Rome in 1576.
  • CARDS
  • The Deck of Cards by Manly Hall
  • (TG) Carnac. A very ancient site in Brittany (France) of a temple of cyclopean structure, sacred to the Sun and the Dragon; and of the same kind as Karnac, in ancient Egypt, and Stonehenge in England. (See the “Origin of the Satanic Myth” in Archaic Symbolism built by the prehistoric hierophant-priests of the Solar Dragon, or symbolized Wisdom (the Solar Kumaras who incarnated being the highest). Each of the stones was personally placed there by the successive priest-adepts in power, and commemorated in symbolic language the degree of power, status, and knowledge of each. (See further Secret Doctrine II. 381, et seq., and also “Karnac
  • (TG) Caste. Originally the system of the four hereditary classes into which the Indian population was divided: Brahman, Kshatriya, Vaisya, and Sudra (or descendants of Brahma, Warriors, Merchants, and the lowest or Agriculturalists). Besides these original four, hundreds have now grown up in India.
  • (KT) Caste. Originally the system of the four hereditary classes into which Indian population was divided: Brahman, Kshatriya, Vaisya and Shoodra — ( a ) descendants of Brahma; ( b ) warrior; ( c ) mercantile, and ( d ) the lowest or agricultural Shoodra class. From these four, hundreds of divisions and minor castes have sprung.
  • (TG) Causal Body. This “body”, which is no body either objective or subjective, but Buddhi, the Spiritual Soul, is so called because it is the direct cause of the Sushupti condition, leading to the Turya state, the highest state of Samadhi. It is called Karanopadhi, “the basis of the Cause”, by the Taraka Raja Yogis; and in the Vedanta system it corresponds to both the Vignanamaya and Anandamaya Kosha, the latter coming next to Atma, and therefore being the vehicle of the universal Spirit. Buddhi alone could not be called a “Causal Body”, but becomes so in conjunction with Manas, the incarnating Entity or EGO.
  • (KT) Causal Body. This “body,” which is in reality no body at all, either objective or subjective, but Buddhi the Spiritual Soul, is so-called because it is the direct cause of the Sushupti state leading to the Turya state, the highest state of Samadhi. It is called Karanopadhi, “the basis of the cause,” by the “Taraka Raj” Yogis, and in the Vedanta System corresponds to both the Vignanamaya and Anandamaya Kosha (the latter coming next to Atma, and therefore being the vehicle of the Universal Spirit). Buddhi alone could not be called a “Causal body,” but becomes one in conjunction with Manas, the incarnating Entity or EGO.
  • (WG) Causal Body, the principle Buddhi in conjunction with Manas , as it thus is the cause for incarnation through its connection with spirit above and matter below. In this sense it is soul, thus with the other two bringing out the classification of body, soul , spirit .
  • (OG) Causal Body — For a proper explanation of the doctrine connected with this term the student is referred to karana-sarira and karanopadhi as defined in this volume. Technically speaking, causal body is a misnomer, for, in fact, the element of man’s constitution here referred to and, mutatis mutandis, when reference is made to beings above and below man, is no body at all, properly speaking, but rather what one might call a soul, although strenuous objection could very logically be taken to the use of this word soul because of the many and often contradictory meanings that common usage has given to it.
  • Furthermore, the expression “causal body” refers to two different things. The meaning, therefore, is dual — a statement which will be explained under karanopadhi. It may be stated here, however, that the two meanings have reference, the first to a lower part of man’s septenary constitution, and the second to a higher part, both parts acting as causes, or instrumental causes, in producing reappearances, or new manifestations, of a reimbodying monad or entity.
  • (TG) Cazotte, Jacques. The wonderful Seer, who predicted the beheading of several royal personages and his own decapitation, at a gay supper some time before the first Revolution in France. He was born at Dijon in 1720, and studied mystic philosophy in the school of Martinez Pasqualis at Lyons. On the 11th of September 1791, he was arrested and condemned to death by the president of the revolutionary government, a man who, shameful to state, had been his fellow-student and a member of the Mystic Lodge of Pasqualis at Lyons. Cazotte was executed on the 25th of September on the Place du Carrousel.
  • (TG) Cecco d’Ascoli. Surnamed “Francesco Stabili.” He lived in the thirteenth century, and was considered the most famous astrologer in his day. A work of his published at Basle in 1485, and called Commentarii in Sphaeram Joannis de Sacrabosco, is still extant. He was burnt alive by the Inquisition in 1327.
  • (PV) Cerbatana {quiche-maya} “Blowgun.” The divine weapon of Hunahpu; emblem of the solar ray. It operates magically for Hunahpu.
  • (TG) Cerberus {Latin}
  • (TG) Cerberus {Greek} the three-headed canine monster, which was supposed to watch at the threshold of Hades, came to the Greeks and Romans from Egypt. It was the monster, half-dog and half-hippopotamus, that guarded the gates of Amenti. The mother of Cerberus was Echidna — a being, half-woman, half-serpent, much honoured in Etruria. Both the Egyptian and the Greek Cerberus are symbols of Kamaloka and its uncouth monsters, the cast-off shells of mortals.
  • (TG) Ceres {Latin}. In Greek Demeter. As the female aspect of Pater Aether, Jupiter, she is esoterically the productive principle in the all-pervading Spirit that quickens every germ in the material universe.
  • (TG) Chabrat Zereh Aur Bokher {Hebr}. An Order of the Rosicrucian stock, whose members study the Kabbalah and Hermetic sciences; it admits both sexes, and has many grades of instruction. The members meet in private, and the very existence of the Order is generally unknown. [w.w.w.]
  • (PV) Chac Of Maya mythology; the four Chac are the equivalent of Tzakol, Bitol, Alom, and Cajolom of the Popol Vuh ; the gods of the four sectors of heaven. The Chac are the owners of the wild plant and animal life of the earth.
  • (TG) Chadayatana {Sans}. Lit., the six dwellings or gates in man for the reception of sensations; thus, on the physical plane, the eyes, nose, ear, tongue, body (or touch) and mind, as a product of the physical brain and on the mental plane (esoterically), spiritual sight, smell, hearing, taste, touch and perception, the whole synthesized by the Buddhi-atmic element. Chadayatana is one of the 12 Nidanas, which form the chain of incessant causation and effect.
  • (TG) Chaitanya {Sans}. The founder of a mystical sect in India. A rather modern sage, believed to be an avatar of Krishna.
  • (WG) Chaitanya, the Supreme Spirit considered as the essence of all being.
  • (SKs) Chaitanya ‘Consciousness,’ ‘Intelligence’; derived from the verb root chit — to think, to understand. Chaitanya is usually applied to the Cosmic Intelligence; hence it is the invisible source and underlying root of man’s consciousness and intelligence.
  • (TG) Tchaitya {Sans}. Any locality made sacred through some event in the life of Buddha; a term signifying the same in relation to gods, and any kind of place or object of worship. [[The Sanskrit words commencing with the letters Tch were, owing to faulty transliteration, misplaced, and now come under C. ]]
  • (TG) Tchakchur {Sans}. The first Vidjnana . Lit., “the eye”, meaning the faculty of sight, or rather, an occult perception of spiritual and subjective realities (Chakshur).
  • (TG) Chakna-padma-karpo {Tibe}. “He who holds the lotus”, used of Chenresi, the Bodhisattva. It is not a genuine Tibetan word, but half Sanskrit.
  • (TG) Chakra {Sans}. A wheel, a disk, or the circle of Vishnu generally. Used also of a cycle of time, and with other meanings.
  • (TG) Tchakra, or Chakra {Sans}. A spell. The disk of Vishnu, which served as a weapon; the wheel of the Zodiac, also the wheel of time, etc. With Vishnu, it was a symbol of divine authority. One of the sixty-five figures of the Sripada, or the mystic foot-print of Buddha which contains that number of symbolical figures. The Tchakra is used in mesmeric phenomena and other abnormal practices.
  • (WG) Chakra, wheel, discus, center; in the body, centres of psychic energy; the weapon of Vishnu, symbolizing cyclic evolution; a cycle.
  • (OG) Chakra {Sans} A word signifying in general a “wheel,” and from this simple original meaning there were often taken for occult and esoteric purposes a great many subordinate, very interesting, and in some cases highly mystical and profound derivatives. Chakra also means a cycle, a period of duration, in which the wheel of time turns once. It also means the horizon, as being circular or of a wheel-form. It likewise means certain centers or pranic spherical loci of the body in which are supposed to collect streams of pranic energy of differing qualities, or pranic energies of different kinds. These physiological chakras, which are actually connected with the pranic circulations and ganglia of the auric egg, and therefore function in the physical body through the intermediary of the linga-sarira or astral model-body, are located in different parts of the physical frame, reaching from the parts about the top of the skull to the parts about the pubis. It would be highly improper, having at heart the best interests of humanity, to give the occult or esoteric teaching concerning the exact location, functions, and means of controlling the physiological chakras of the human body; for it is a foregone conclusion that were this mystical knowledge broadcast, it would be sadly misused, leading not only in many cases to death or insanity, but to the violation of every moral instinct. Alone the high initiates, who as a matter of fact have risen above the need of employing the physiological chakras, can use them at will, and for holy purposes — which in fact is something that they rarely, if indeed they ever do.
  • (GH) Chakra A word with a number of meanings: a wheel; a circle; a discus — the weapon of Vishnu (hence also a symbol of the deity); a cycle or period of time; also the physiological centers of pranic vitality in the human body. In Buddhism the chakra is a favorite symbol, especially associated with Gautama the Buddha, for he is represented as setting a new chakra in motion: his disciples, in broadcasting his message are often referred to as ‘turning the wheel.’ As the weapon of Vishnu, the chakra means “the whirling wheel of spiritual will and power.” (W. Q. Judge, p. in footnote,
  • (SP) Cakra [chakra] — wheel, cycle of time, or energy center in the body.
  • (TG) Chakshub {Sans}. The “eye” . Loka-chakshub or “the eye of the world” is a title of the Sun.
  • (WG) Chakshus, the eye.
  • (TG) Chaldean Book of Numbers. A work which contains all that is found in the Zohar of Simeon Ben-Jochai, and much more. It must be the older by many centuries, and in one sense its original, as it contains all the fundamental principles taught in the Jewish Kabbalistic works, but none of their blinds. It is very rare indeed, there being perhaps only two or three copies extant, and these in private hands.
  • (TG) Chaldeans, or Kasdim. At first a tribe, then a caste of learned Kabbalists. They were the savants, the magians of Babylonia, astrologers and diviners. The famous Hillel, the precursor of Jesus in philosophy and in ethics, was a Chaldean. Franck in his Kabbala points to the close resemblance of the “secret doctrine” found in the Avesta and the religious metaphysics of the Chaldees.
  • (IU) Chaldeans, Or Kasdim. — At first a tribe, then a caste of learned kabalists. They were the savants, the magians of Babylonia, astrologers and diviners. The famous Hillel, the precursor of Jesus in philosophy and in ethics, was a Chaldean. Franck in his Kabbala points to the close resemblance of the “secret doctrine” found in the Avesta and the religious metaphysics of the Chaldees.
  • (VS) Chamber (I 23) [[p. 18]] The inner chamber of the Heart, called in Sanskrit Brahma poori . The “fiery power” is Kundalini.
  • (PV) Chan “Serpent.” The name the Chorti Maya apply to themselves: “people of the serpent,” whose chief is called Hor chan (head of the serpent). The generic name of the Maya as a whole, whose cultural totem is the serpent, as a divine nahual. The equivalent of the Quiche word cumatz .
  • (TG) Tchandalas, or Chhandalas {Sans}. Outcasts, or people without caste, a name now given to all the lower classes of the Hindus; but in antiquity it was applied to a certain class of men, who, having forfeited their right to any of the four castes — Brahmans, Kshatriyas, Vaisyas and Sudras — were expelled from cities and sought refuge in the forests. Then they became “bricklayers”, until finally expelled they left the country, some 4,000 years before our era. Some see in them the ancestors of the earlier Jews, whose tribes began with A-brahm or “No-Brahm”. To this day it is the class most despised by the Brahmins in India.
  • (WG) Chandala, an outcast, a pariah.
  • (TG) Chandra {Sans}. The Moon; also a deity. The terms Chandra and Soma are synonyms.
  • (WG) Chandra, the moon. (Literally, “glittering.”)
  • (TG) Chandragupta {Sans}. The first Buddhist King in India, the grandsire of the Sandracottus of the all-bungling Greek writers who went to India in Alexander’s time
  • (TG) Tchandragupta, or Chandragupta {Sans}. The son of Nanda, the first Buddhist King of the Morya Dynasty, the grandfather of King Asoka, “the beloved of the gods” (Piyadasi).
  • (FY) Chandragupta, one of the kings of Magadha, an ancient province of India.
  • (TG) Chandra-kanta {Sans}. “The moon-stone”, a gem that is claimed to be formed and developed under the moon-beam is, which give it occult and magical properties. It has a very cooling influence in fever if applied to both temples.
  • (TG) Chandramanam {Sans}. The method of calculating time by the Moon.
  • (FY) Chandramanam, the method of calculating time by the movements of the moon.
  • (TG) Chandra-vansa {Sans}. The “Lunar Race”, in contradistinction to Suryavansa, the “Solar Race”. Some Orientalists think it an inconsistency that Krishna, a Chandravansa (of the Yadu branch) should have been declared an Avatar of Vishnu, who is a manifestation of the solar energy in Rig-Veda, a work of unsurpassed authority with the Brahmans. This shows, however, the deep occult meaning of the Avatar; a meaning which only esoteric philosophy can explain. A glossary is no fit place for such explanations; but it may be useful to remind those who know, and teach those who do not, that in Occultism, man is called a solar-lunar being, solar in his higher triad, and lunar in his quaternary. Moreover, it is the Sun who imparts his light to the Moon, in the same way as the human triad sheds its divine light on the mortal shell of sinful man. Life celestial quickens life terrestrial. Krishna stands metaphysically for the Ego made one with Atma-Buddhi, and performs mystically the same function as the Christos of the Gnostics, both being “the inner god in the temple” — man. Lucifer is “the bright morning star”, a well known symbol in Revelations, and, as a planet, corresponds to the EGO. Now Lucifer (or the planet Venus) is the Sukra-Usanas of the Hindus; and Usanas is the Daitya-guru, i.e ., the spiritual guide and instructor of the Danavas and the Daityas. The latter are the giant-demons in the Puranas, and in the esoteric interpretations, the antetypal symbol of the man of flesh, physical mankind. The Daityas can raise themselves, it is said, through knowledge “austerities and devotion” to the rank of the gods and of the ABSOLUTE.” All this is very suggestive in the legend of Krishna; and what is more suggestive still is that just as Krishna, the Avatar of a great God in India, is of the race of Yadu, so is another incarnation, “God incarnate himself” — or the “God-man Christ”, also of the race Iadoo — the name for the Jews all over Asia. Moreover, as his mother, who is represented as Queen of Heaven standing on the crescent, is identified in Gnostic philosophy, and also in the esoteric system, with the Moon herself, like all the other lunar goddesses such as Isis, Diana, Astarte and others — mothers of the Logoi, so Christ is called repeatedly in the Roman Catholic Church, the Sun-Christ, the Christ-Soleil and so on. If the later is a metaphor so also is the earlier.
  • (TG) Chandrayana {Sans}. The lunar year chronology.
  • (TG) Chantong {Tibe}. “He of the 1,000 Eyes”, a name of Padmapani or Chenresi (Avalokitesvara).
  • (TG) Chaos {Greek}. The Abyss, the “Great Deep”. It was personified in Egypt by the Goddess Neith, anterior to all gods. As Deveria says, “the only God, without form and sex, who gave birth to itself, and without fecundation, is adored under the form of a Virgin Mother”. She is the vulture-headed Goddess found in the oldest period of Abydos, who belongs, accordingly to Mariette Bey, to the first Dynasty, which would make her, even on the confession of the time-dwarfing Orientalists, about 7,000 years old. As Mr. Bonwick tells us in his excellent work on Egyptian belief — “Neith, Nut, Nepte, Nuk (her names as variously read!) is a philosophical conception worthy of the nineteenth century after the Christian era, rather than the thirty-ninth before it or earlier than that”. And he adds: “Neith or Nout is neither more nor less than the Great Mother, and yet the Immaculate Virgin, or female God from whom all things proceeded”. Neith is the “Father-mother” of the Stanzas of the Secret Doctrine, the Swabhavat of the Northern Buddhists, the immaculate Mother indeed, the prototype of the latest “Virgin” of all; for, as Sharpe says, “the Feast of Candlemas — in honour of the goddess Neith — is yet marked in our Almanacs as Candlemas day, or the Purification of the Virgin Mary”; and Beauregard tells us of “the Immaculate Conception of the Virgin, who can henceforth, as well as the Egyptian Minerva, the mysterious Neith, boast of having come from herself, and of having given birth to God”. He who would deny the working of cycles and the recurrence of events, let him read what Neith was 7,000 years ago, in the conception of the Egyptian Initiates, trying to popularize a philosophy too abstract for the masses; and then remember the subjects of dispute at the Council of Ephesus in 431, when Mary was declared Mother of God; and her Immaculate Conception forced on the World as by command of God, by Pope and Council in 1858. Neith is Swabhavat and also the Vedic Aditi and the Puranic Akasa, for “she is not only the celestial vault, or ether, but is made to appear in a tree, from which she gives the fruit of the Tree of Life (like another Eve) or pours upon her worshippers some of the divine water of life”. Hence she gained the favourite appellation of “Lady of the Sycamore”, an epithet applied to another Virgin (Bonwick). The resemblance becomes still more marked when Neith is found on old pictures represented as a Mother embracing the ram-headed god, the “Lamb”. An ancient stele declares her to be “Neut, the luminous, who has engendered the gods” — the Sun included, for Aditi is the mother of the Marttanda, the Sun — an Aditya. She is Naus, the celestial ship; hence we find her on the prow of the Egyptian vessels, like Dido on the prow of the ships of the Phoenician mariners, and forthwith we have the Virgin Mary, from Mar, the “Sea” , called the “Virgin of the Sea”, and the “Lady Patroness” of all Roman Catholic seamen. The Rev. Sayce is quoted by Bonwick, explaining her as a principle in the Babylonian Bahu (Chaos, or confusion) i.e ., “merely the Chaos of Genesis . . . and perhaps also Mot, the primitive substance that was the mother of all the gods”. Nebuchadnezzar seems to have been in the mind of the learned professor, since he left the following witness in cuneiform language, “I built a temple to the Great Goddess, my Mother”. We may close with the words of Mr. Bonwick with which we thoroughly agree: “She (Neith) is the Zerouana of the Avesta, ‘time without limits’. She is the Nerfe of the Etruscans, half a woman and half a fish” (whence the connection of the Virgin Mary with the fish and Pisces ; of whom it is said: “From holy good Nerfe the navigation is happy. She is the Bythos of the Gnostics, the One of the Neoplatonists, the All of German metaphysicians, the Anaita of Assyria.”
  • (OG) Chaos — (Greek) A word usually thought to mean a sort of helter-skelter treasury of original principles and seeds of beings. Well, so it verily is, in one profound sense; but it is most decidedly and emphatically not helter-skelter. It is properly the kosmic storehouse of all the latent or resting seeds of beings and things from former manvantaras. Of course it is this, simply because it contains everything. It means space, not the highest mystical or actual space, not the parabrahma-mulaprakriti, the Boundless — not that. But the space of any particular hierarchy descending into manifestation, what space for it is at that particular period of its beginning of development. The directive principles in chaos are the gods when they awaken from their pralayic sleep. Chaos in one sense may very truly be called the condition of the space of a solar system or even of a planetary chain during its pralaya. When awakening to planetary action begins, chaos pari passu ceases. WW Chaos Now let us take the Greek word chaos, chaos . Hesiod, in his Theogony, says “[[greek char]],” “first chaos was.” The singularity of this verb, [[greek char]], is that it signifies to become . Obviously enough, not to become from nothing; but Chaos first became in the sense of the first dawn of manifestation, the first flutter of awakening life on a plane below that of material homogeneity. As you will remember, last week we spoke of hierarchies, and of one common life running through all; the gods of one being the elementals of the next higher, and the elementals of one being the gods of the next lower. Now Chaos may be called the first material extension in (not of ) space. Milton speaks of the “void and formless infinite” when he refers to chaos; and when we study the first verse in the Hebrew Bible, which I hope to take up today, we will see that “void” must not be taken in the sense of absolute vacuity, but as void of manifestation, void of what is here, void of heterogeneity. Milton again speaks of it as being “matter unformed and void”; and this is a typically Greek sense of the word chaos. Ovid speaks of “rudis indigestaque moles” ( Metam ., 1, 7), “the rude, confused mass.” This is the primal manifestation of matter conceived of from another viewpoint. Get the thought, the meaning, of the thing: the rude and unformed, inchoate mass of the Roman, conceived of as emptiness by the Greek. Gas may be conceived of from one point of view as being as thick and coarse and heavy as mud, but looked at from our material plane a gas is tenuous, invisible, thin. So Chaos, as it is often conceived of, may be called the yawning abyss, and this is the very translation given to a certain word in the Scandinavian Eddas . This word is Ginungagap, translated as the yawning abyss ; the same meaning, the same conception, that is applied to chaos. The difference between chaos and space is finally this: that space is limitless boundlessness, limitless duration, whereas chaos is the conception of extension as applied to the dawn of a solar system, or of a universe. First, voidness, so far as condensed matter is concerned; then the first quiver of life runs through the homogeneity of that part, if I may use that term, of space; and, as H. P. Blavatsky so beautifully expresses it in The Secret Doctrine, “the mother awakens from her sleep after seven eternities”. Manifestation begins, and through ages upon ages of constant thickening and coarsening, matter is formed — first so subtle, thin, diaphanous that we have no conception of it, vastly more tenuous than our gas; then thickening, coarsening constantly, until we arrive at our own rocky sphere. You see then that Chaos is the opposite of Kosmos; as Kosmos is that which is marshalled, arranged, set in order, the handiwork of the Lord, as the Hebrew Bible puts it, the handiwork of the gods, or the handiwork of the angels, as the Kabbalah puts it. So Chaos is the opposite of it, the lack of material shape, form, order — not disorder, though it is often conceived of by the ancient poets under that figure merely by force of contrast as compared with the word Kosmos. As I have said, when Ovid speaks of “the rude and unformed mass”, he looks at it from one point of view; he does not mean spiritual atoms floating about without law; it is a conception higher than that of atoms. To use a material symbol, we may speak of it as water. Water is colorless, we will say, transparent; and if we were marine or aquatic animals we could live in water as we now live in air. We will conceive of water as being infinitely fluid, instead of being only partially so, and as possessing no properties whatever except that of its own characteristic. Now the animals that dwell in water, the plants that have their being in water, we may conceive of as analogies to the divine beings in the waters of space, in the waters of chaos. “And the spirit of the Gods (Elohim) played upon the waters”, as the Hebrew Bible says; and every word of that is full of meaning, as we shall see when we come to it. When Milton talks of chaos as that “where eldest Night and Chaos, ancestors of Nature, hold eternal anarchy” ( Paradise Lost , II, 95), he is partly right and partly wrong. It is true that the ancient poets speak of eldest night, and Hesiod, from whom Milton draws, speaks of Night and Chaos as the ancestors of nature, ( But there can be no anarchy where there is no manifestation; there can only be anarchy (which means a condition of being or society without a center or head, without a government) in manifestation. Homogeneity is oneness; and anarchy can only exist in heterogeneity, or, in other words, where there is conflict of wills. Were man perfect we would have no need of any government, or law. Man is not perfect, therefore law is imposed by man in self-protection. Man invents laws, finds out the way of governing himself and his fellows, studies to stimulate his own sense of duty, teaches the necessity of self-control, etc. But Milton is right if he uses “anarchy” as the opposite of “Kosmos.”
  • (TG) Charaka {Sans}. A writer on Medicine who lived in Vedic times. He is believed to have been an incarnation (Avatara) of the Serpent Sesha, i.e., an embodiment of divine Wisdom, since Sesha-Naga, the King of the “Serpent” race, is synonymous with Ananta, the seven-headed Serpent, on which Vishnu sleeps during the pralayas. Ananta is the “endless” and the symbol of eternity, and as such, one with Space, while Sesha is only periodical in his manifestations. Hence while Vishnu is identified with Ananta, Charaka is only the Avatar of Sesha. (See “Ananta” and “Sesha
  • (FY) Charaka, the most celebrated writer on medicine among the Hindus.
  • (TG) Charnock, Thomas. A great alchemist of the sixteenth century; a surgeon who lived and practiced near Salisbury, studying the art in some neighbouring cloisters with a priest. It is said that he was initiated into the final secret of transmutation by the famous mystic William Bird, who “had been a prior of Bath and defrayed the expense of repairing the Abbey Church from the gold which he made by the red and white elixirs” Charnock wrote his Breviary of Philosophy in the year 1557 and the Enigma of Alchemy, in 1574.
  • (TG) Charon {Greek}. The Egyptian Khu-en-ua, the hawk-headed Steersman of the boat conveying the Souls across the black waters that separate life from death. Charon, the Sun of Erebus and Nox, is a variant of Khu-en-ua. The dead were obliged to pay an obolus, a small piece of money, to this grim ferryman of the Styx and Acheron; therefore the ancients always placed a coin under the tongue of the deceased. This custom has been preserved in our own times, for most of the lower classes in Russia place coppers in the coffin under the head of the dead for post mortem expenses.
  • (TG) Charvaka {Sans}. There were two famous beings of this name. One a Rakshasa (demon) who disguised himself as a Brahman and entered Hastina-pura; whereupon the Brahmans discovered the imposture and reduced Charvaka to ashes with the fire of their eyes, — i.e ., magnetically by means of what is called in Occultism the “black glance” or evil eye. The second was a terrible materialist and denier of all but matter, who if he could come back to life, would put to shame all the “Free thinkers” and “Agnostics” of the day. He lived before the Ramayanic period, but his teachings and school have survived to this day, and he has even now followers, who are mostly to be found in Bengal.
  • (WG) Charvaka, a Hindu philosopher, founder of the Charvaka system of philosophy, which is considered by some to be materialistic.
  • (TG) Chastanier, Benedict. A French mason who established in London in 1767 a Lodge called “The Illuminated Theosophists”.
  • (TG) Chaturdasa Bhuyanam {Sans}. The fourteen lokas or planes of existence. Esoterically, the dual seven states.
  • (FY) Chaturdasa Bhuvanam, the fourteen lokas or states.
  • (TG) Tchatur Maharaja {Sans}. The “four kings”, Devas, who guard the four quarters of the universe, and are connected with Karma.
  • (WG) Chaturmasya, three sacrifices performed every four months, at the beginning of the three seasons.
  • (TG) Chatur mukha {Sans}. The “four-faced one”, a title of Brahma.
  • (TG) Chatur Varna {Sans}. The four castes ( lit., colours).
  • (TG) Chaturyoni {Sans}. Written also tchatur-yoni. The same as Karmaya or “the four modes of birth” — four ways of entering on the path of birth as decided by Karma: (a) birth from the womb, as men and mammalia; (b) birth from an egg, as birds and reptiles; (c) from moisture and air-germs, as insects; and (d) by sudden self-transformation, as Bodhisattvas and Gods (Anupadaka).
  • (TG) Chavigny, Jean Aime de. A disciple of the world-famous Nostradamus, an astrologer and an alchemist of the sixteenth century. He died in the year 1604. His life was a very quiet one and he was almost unknown to his contemporaries; but he left a precious manuscript on the pre-natal and post-natal influence of the stars on certain marked individuals, a secret revealed to him by Nostradamus. This treatise was last in the possession of the Emperor Alexander of Russia.
  • (TG) Chaya {Hebr}. The same as Eve: “the Mother of all that lives”; “Life”.
  • (GH) Chekitana An ally of the Pandavas: a son of Dhrishtaketu (or Kaikeya), the father-in-law of Krishna and Raja of the Kekayas, (one of the chief nations in the war of the Mahabharata). ( Bhagavad-Gita, W. Q. Judge, p. 2)
  • (TG) Chela {Sans}. A disciple, the pupil of a Guru or Sage, the follower of some adept of a school of philosophy ( lit., child).
  • (KT) Chela {Sans} A disciple. The pupil of a Guru or Sage, the follower of some Adept, or a school of philosophy.
  • (FY) Chela, a pupil of an adept in occultism; a disciple.
  • (WG) Chela, pupil, disciple
  • (OG) Chela — ( Cela ) An old Indian term. In archaic times more frequently spelled and pronounced cheta or cheda. The meaning is “servant,” a personal disciple attached to the service of a teacher from whom he receives instruction. The idea is closely similar to the Anglo-Saxon term leorning-cneht, meaning “learning servant,” a name given in Anglo-Saxon translations of the Christian New Testament to the disciples of Jesus, his “chelas.” It is, therefore, a word used in old mystical scriptures for a disciple, a pupil, a learner or hearer. The relationship of teacher and disciple is infinitely more sacred even than that of parent and child; because, while the parents give the body to the incoming soul, the teacher brings forth that soul itself and teaches it to be and therefore to see, teaches it to know and to become what it is in its inmost being — that is, a divine thing.
  • The chela life or chela path is a beautiful one, full of joy to its very end, but also it calls forth and needs everything noble and high in the learner or disciple; for the powers or faculties of the higher self must be brought into activity in order to attain and to hold those summits of intellectual and spiritual grandeur where the Masters themselves live. For that, masterhood, is the end of discipleship — not, however, that this ideal should be set before us merely as an end to attain to as something of benefit for one’s own self, because that very thought is a selfish one and therefore a stumbling in the path. It is for the individual’s benefit, of course; yet the true idea is that everything and every faculty that is in the soul shall be brought out in the service of all humanity, for this is the royal road, the great royal thoroughfare, of self-conquest. The more mystical meanings attached to this term chela can be given only to those who have irrevocably pledged themselves to the esoteric life.
  • (SKv) Chela In archaic times Chela was spelled Cheta or Cheda, a word meaning ‘servant.’ A chela has come to mean a disciple or a devoted servant and pupil of one who gives spiritual instruction. To become an accepted Chela of the Masters of Wisdom, qualifications of a very high order are necessary: unselfishness, generosity of heart and mind, courage, fidelity, purity of mind and body, love of spiritual things, and an awakened intuition and acceptance of universal laws and their workings.
  • (SP) Cela [chela] (student or disciple) is actually a Hindi word, cela, derived from a Sanskrit word for servant, with variant forms ceta, cetaka, ceda, and cedaka. The usual Sanskrit word for student is sisya.
  • (TG) Chemi {Egyp}. The ancient name of Egypt.
  • (WG) Chemi, the land of Egypt.
  • (TG) Chenresi {Tibe}. The Tibetan Avalokitesvara, The Bodhisattva Padmapani, a divine Buddha.
  • (TG) Tcherno-Bog {slav}. Lit., “black god”; the chief deity of the ancient Slavonian nations.
  • (TG) Tchertchen. An oasis in Central Asia, situated about 4,000 feet above the river Tchertchen Darya; the very hot-bed and centre of ancient civilization, surrounded on all sides by numberless ruins, above and below ground, of cities, towns, and burial-places of every description. As the late Colonel Prjevalski reported, the oasis is inhabited by some 3,000 people “representing the relics of about a hundred nations and races now extinct, the very names of which are at present unknown to ethnologists”.
  • (TG) Cheru {Nors}. Or Heru. A magic sword, a weapon of the “sword-god” Heru. In the Edda, the Saga describes it as destroying its possessor, should he be unworthy of wielding it. It brings victory and fame only in the hand of a virtuous hero.
  • (TG) Cherubim {Hebr}. According to the Kabbalists, a group of angels, which they specially associated with the Sephira Jesod. In Christian teaching, an order of angels who are “watchers”. Genesis places Cherubim to guard the lost Eden, and the O.T. frequently refers to them as guardians of the divine glory. Two winged representations in gold were placed over the Ark of the Covenant; colossal figures of the same were also placed in the Sanctum Sanctorum of the Temple of Solomon. Ezekiel describes them in poetic language. Each Cherub appears to have been a compound figure with four faces — of a man, eagle, lion, and ox, and was certainly winged. Parkhurst, in voc. Cherub, suggests that the derivation of the word is from K, a particle of similitude, and RB or RUB, greatness, master, majesty, and so an image of godhead. Many other nations have displayed similar figures as symbols of deity; e.g., the Egyptians in their figures of Serapis, as Macrobius describes in his Saturnalia; the Greeks had their triple-headed Hecate, and the Latins had three-faced mages of Diana, as Ovid tells us, ecce procul ternis Hecate variata figuris. Virgil also describes her in the fourth Book of the Aeneid. Porphyry and Eusebius write the same of Proserpine. The Vandals had a many-headed deity they called Triglaf. The ancient German races had an idol Rodigast with human body and heads of the ox, eagle, and man, The Persians have some figures of Mithras with a man’s body, lion’s head, and four wings. Add to these the Chimaera, Sphinx of Egypt, Moloch, Astarte of the Syrians, and some figures of Isis with Bull’s, horns and feathers of a bird on the head. [w.w.w.]
  • (TG) Chesed {Hebr}. “Mercy”, also named Gedulah, the fourth of the ten Sephiroth; a masculine or active potency. [w.w.w.]
  • (WG) Chesed {Hebr}, mercy. The fourth of the ten Sephiroth of the Kabalah. A masculine potency, sometimes called Gedulah .
  • (WG) Chetana, knowledge of right and wrong; the thinking principle
  • (TG) Tchhanda Riddhi Pada {Sans}. “The step of desire”, a term used in Raja Yoga. It is the final renunciation of all desire as a sine qua non condition of phenomenal powers, and entrance on the direct path of Nirvana.
  • (TG) Chhandoga {Sans}. A Samhita collection of Sama Veda; also a priest, a chanter of the Sama Veda.
  • (TG) Chhanmuika {Sans}. A great Bodhisattva with the Northern Buddhists, famous for his ardent love of Humanity; regarded in the esoteric schools as a Nirmanakaya.
  • (TG) Chhannagarikah {Tibe}. Lit., the school of six cities. A famous philosophical school where Chelas are prepared before entering on the Path.
  • (TG) Chhassidi or Chasdim. In the Septuagint Assidai, and in English Assideans. They are also mentioned in Maccabees I., vii., 13, as being put to death with many others. They were the followers of Mattathias, the father of the Maccabeans, and were all initiated mystics, or Jewish adepts. The word means: “skilled; learned in all wisdom, human and divine”. Mackenzie the guardians of the Temple for the preservation of its purity; but as Solomon and his Temple are both allegorical and had no real existence, the Temple means in this case the “body of Israel” and its morality.” Scaliger connects this Society of the Assideans with that of the Essenes, deeming it the predecessor of the latter.”
  • (TG) Chhaya {Sans}. “Shade” or “Shadow”, The name of a creature produced by Sanjna, the wife of Surya, from herself (astral body). Unable to endure the ardour of her husband, Sanjna left Chhaya in her place as a wife, going herself away to perform austerities. Chhaya is the astral image of a person in esoteric philosophy.
  • (WG) Chhaya, a reflected image, shadow, shade; the astral image projected as a model for material man.
  • (OG) Chhaya — ( Chaya, Sanskrit) Literally a “shade,” “simulacrum,” or “copy.” In the esoteric philosophy, the word signifies the astral image of a person, and with this idea are bound up some of the most intricate and recondite teachings of human evolution. The Secret Doctrine of H. P. Blavatsky contains many invaluable hints as to the part played by the chhayas of the pitris in human development.
  • It is a word also which is applied with similar meaning to kosmical matters, for the esoteric student should never forget the ancient maxim of Hermes: “What is above is the same as what is below; what is below is the same as what is above.”
  • Briefly, then, and so far as human evolution is concerned, the chhaya may be called the astral body or image.
  • (SKs) Chhaya A ‘shade or shadow’; the lower astral form or Lingasarira. The term Chhaya is often used in connexion with those human astral forms of the First Race around which the physical bodies of the following Races were built. In the early days of humanity on this Globe the outer man was astral in substance; later this astral form became the inner form and the physical body became the outermost vehicle. This early Race of men was called by the ancients the ‘Shadow Race’ or Race of Chhayas.
  • (SP) Chaya [cchaya] — a shade or shadow.
  • (IN) Chhaya {Sans} A “shade, shadow,” the astral or model body.
  • (TG) Chhaya loka {Sans}. The world of Shades; like Hades, the world of the Eidola and Umbae. We call it Kamaloka.
  • (IN) Chhaya-loka {Sans} Shadow of cosmic spirit; also the sphere of shades, kama-loka.
  • (TG) Chiah {Hebr}. Life; Vita, Revivificatio. In the Kabbala, the second highest essence of the human soul, corresponding to Chokmah (Wisdom).
  • (TG) Chichhakti {Sans}. Chih-Sakti; the power which generates thought.
  • (FY) Chichakti, the power which generates thought.
  • (TG) Chidagnikundum {Sans}. Lit., “the fire-hearth in the heart the seat of the force which extinguishes all individual desires.
  • (FY) Chidagnikundum (lit. “The fireplace in the heart”), the seat of the force which extinguishes all individual desires.
  • (SKf) Chidagnikunda The Agni-kunda is the ‘fire-hearth’ of Chit or Pure Consciousness and Thought. When one becomes a Mahatman or a Great-Self he raises his ego-consciousness to that innermost heart of his being, to the Chid-agni-kunda, where all personality disappears and universality is realized.
  • (TG) Chidakasam {Sans}. The field, or basis of consciousness.
  • (FY) Chidakasam, the field of consciousness.
  • (WG) Chidatma, the Logos — that is, the unitary soul and intelligence in one aspect ( chit, intelligence; atma
  • (TG) Chifflet, Jean. A Canon-Kabbalist reputed to have learned a key to the Gnostic works from Coptic Initiates; he wrote a work on Abraxas in two portions, the esoteric portion of which was burnt by the Church.
  • (TG) Chiim {Hebr}. A Plural noun — “lives”; found in compound names Elohim Chiim, the gods of lives, Parkhurst translates “the living God”; and Rach Chiim, Spirit of lives or of life. [w.w.w.]
  • (TG) Tchikitsa Yidya Shastra {Sans}. A treatise on occult medicine, which contains a number of “magic” prescriptions. It is one of the Pancha Vidya Shastras or Scriptures.
  • (PV) Chilam Balam, Books of Manuscripts written in the Mayan language but in Roman letters by native Mayans during the late 17th and early 18th centuries, after Spanish conquest of the Yucatan Peninsula and suppression of the native religion. The principal ones among these manuscripts, the Chumayel, Tizimin, and Mani, are named after the towns in Yucatan where they were found. About nine other manuscripts are known at the present time; it is likely that more are preserved in secrecy. The so-called Books of Chilam Balam are the sacred books of the Yucatan Mayas, and probably very many of them existed in towns and villages during the Colonial period.
  • (PV) Chimalmat {quiche-maya} Wife of Vukup Cakix, and mother of Zipacna and Caprakan. Together, these are the four giants of Quiche-Maya theogony.
  • (TG) China, The Kabbalah of. One of the oldest known Chinese books is the Yih King, or Book of Changes. It is reported to have been written 2850 B.C., in the dialect of the Accadian black races of Mesopotamia. It is a most abstruse system of Mental and Moral Philosophy, with a scheme of universal relation and divination. Abstract ideas are represented by lines, half lines, circle, and points. Thus a circle represents YIH, the Great Supreme; a line is referred to YIN, the Masculine Active Potency; two half lines are YANG, the Feminine. Passive Potency. KWEI is the animal soul, SHAN intellect, KHIEN heaven or Father, KHWAN earth or Mother, KAN or QHIN Son; male numbers are odd, represented by light circles, female numbers are even, by black circles. There are two most mysterious diagrams, one called, “HO or the River Map”, and also associated with a Horse; and the other called “The Writing of LO”; these are formed of groups of white and black circles, arranged in a Kabbalistic manner.
  • The text is by a King, named Wan, and the commentary by Kan, his son; the text is allowed to be older than the time of Confucius. [w.w.w.]
  • (TG) Tchina {Sans}. The name of China in Buddhist works, the land being so called since the Tsin dynasty, which was established in the year 349 before our era.
  • (FY) Chinmatra, the germ of consciousness, abstract consciousness.
  • (WG) Chinmatra, pure intelligence.
  • (TG) Chit {Sans}. Abstract Consciousness.
  • (FY) Chit, the abstract consciousness.
  • (WG) Chit, intelligence, perception; the element of immaterial and eternal spirit in each human being, the individual soul; intelligent force; potential understanding; one of the aspects of Parabrahmam. It is held that chit and achit do not exist without Parabrahmam, but, like substance and quality, are in inseparable union with one another and with Parabrahmam.
  • (SP) Cit [chit] — pure consciousness.
  • (TG) Chitanuthour {Hebr}. Chitons, a priestly garb; the “coats of skin” given by Java Aleim to Adam and Eve after their fall.
  • (TG) Chitkala {Sans}. In Esoteric philosophy, identical with the Kumaras, those who first incarnated into the men of the Third Root-Race
  • (TG) Chitra Gupta {Sans}. The deva (or god) who is the recorder of Yama (the god of death), and who is supposed to read the account of every Soul’s life from a register called Agra Sandhani, when the said soul appears before the seat of Judgment. (See “Agra Sandhani
  • (WG) Chitra-gupta, name of one of the beings recording the vices and virtues of mankind in Yama’s world. ( chat, visible, ether; gupta, guarded, preserved: preserved in the ether
  • (TG) Chitra Sikkandinas {Sans}. The constellation of the great Bear; the habitat of the seven Rishis (Sapta-Riksha). Lit., “bright-crested”.
  • (GH) Chitraratha The king of the Gandharvas . (Meaning of the word itself: having a fine car. Bhagavad-Gita, W. Q. Judge, p. 74)
  • (WG) Chitta, thought, mind, reason: the heart considered as the seat of intellect; notice (in the sense of observation).
  • (TG) Tchitta Riddhi Pada {Sans}. “The step of memory.” The third condition of the mystic series which leads to the acquirement of adeptship; i.e., the renunciation of physical memory, and of all thoughts connected with worldly or personal events in one’s life — benefits, personal pleasures or associations. Physical memory has to be sacrificed, and recalled by will power only when absolutely needed. The Riddhi Pada, lit., the four “Steps to Riddhi”, are the four modes of controlling and finally of annihilating desire, memory, and finally meditation itself — so far as these are connected with any effort of the physical brain — meditation then becomes absolutely spiritual.
  • (TG) Tchitta Smriti Upasthana {Sans}. One of the four aims of Smriti Upasthana, i.e., the keeping ever in mind the transitory character of man’s life, and the incessant revolution of the wheel of existence.
  • (FY) Chitta suddhi ( Chitta, mind, and Suddi, purification), purification of the mind.
  • (TG) Chnournis {Greek}. The same as Chnouphis and Kneph. A symbol of creative force; Chnoumis or Kneph is “the unmade and eternal deity” according to Plutarch. He is represented as blue (ether), and with his ram’s head with an asp between the horns, he might be taken for Ammon or Chnouphis . The fact is that all these gods are solar, and represent under various aspects the phases of generation and impregnation. Their ram’s heads denote this meaning, a ram ever symbolizing generative energy in the abstract, while the bull was the symbol of strength and the creative function. All were one god, whose attributes were individualised and personified. According to Sir G. Wilkinson, Kneph or Chnoumis was “the idea of the Spirit of God”; and Bonwick explains that, as Av, “matter” or “flesh”, he was criocephalic (ramheaded), wearing a solar disk on the head, standing on the Serpent Mehen, with a viper in his left and a cross in his right hand, and bent upon the function of creation in the underworld (the earth, esoterically). The Kabbalists identify him with Binah, the third Sephira of the Sephirothal Tree, or “Binah, represented by the Divine name of Jehovah”. If as Chnoumis-Kneph, he represents the Indian Narayana, the Spirit of God moving on the waters of space, as Eichton or Ether he holds in his mouth an Egg, the symbol of evolution; and as Av he is Siva, the Destroyer and the Regenerator; for, as Deveria explains: “His journey to the lower hemispheres appears to symbolize the evolutions of substances, which are born to die and to be reborn.” Esoterically, however, and as taught by the Initiates of the inner temple, Chnoumis-Kneph was pre-eminently the god of reincarnation. Says an inscription: “I am Chnoumis, Son of the Universe, 700”, a mystery having a direct reference to the reincarnating EGO.
  • (TG) Chnouphis {Greek}. Nouf in Egyptian. Another aspect of Ammon, and the personification of his generative power in actu, as Kneph is of the same in potentia. He is also ram-headed. If in his aspect as Kneph he is the Holy Spirit with the creative ideation brooding in him, as Chnouphis, he is the angel who “comes in” into the Virgin soil and flesh. A prayer on a papyrus, translated by the French Egyptologist Chabas, says; “O Sepui, Cause of being, who hast formed thine own. body! O only Lord, proceeding from Nourn! O divine substance, created from itself! O God, who hast made the substance which is in him! O God, who has made his own father and impregnated his own mother.” This shows the origin of the Christian doctrines of the Trinity and in immaculate conception. He is seen on a monument seated near a potter’s wheel, and forming men out of clay. The fig-leaf is sacred to him, which is alone sufficient to prove him a phallic god — an idea which is carried out by the inscription: “he who made that which is, the creator of beings, the first existing, he who made to exist all that exists.” Some see in him the incarnation of Ammon-Ra, but he is the latter himself in his phallic aspect, for, like Ammon, he is “his mother’s husband”, i.e., the male or impregnating side of Nature. His names vary, as Cnouphis, Noum, Khern, and Khnum or Chnoumis. As he represents the Demiurgos (or Logos) from the material, lower aspect of the Soul of the World, he is the Agathodaemon, symbolized sometimes by a Serpent; and his wife Athor or Maut (Mot mother), or Sate, “the daughter of the Sun”, carrying an arrow on a sunbeam (the ray of conception), stretches “mistress over the lower portions of the atmosphere”, below the constellations, as Neith expands over the starry heavens. (See “Chaos
  • (TG) Chohan {Tibe}. “Lord” or “Master”; a chief; thus Dhyan-Chohan would answer to “Chief of the Dhyanis”, or celestial Lights — which in English would be translated Archangels.
  • (WG) Chohan, Lord and Master. Spiritual beings. See Secret Doctrine for fuller explanations.
  • (IN) Chohan(s) “Lord,” superior chief, divine or human.
  • (TG) Chokmah {Hebr}. Wisdom; the second of the ten Sephiroth, and the second of the supernal Triad, A masculine potency corresponding to the Yod (I) of the Tetragrammaton IHVH, and to Ab, the Father. [w.w.w.]
  • (WG) Chockmah {Hebr}, wisdom. The second of the ten Sephiroth in the Kabalah. The second of the supernal triad. A masculine potency.
  • (PV) Chorti A Maya people, direct descendants of the builders of classical Copan, the apogee of Maya culture. The Chorti now live in a number of villages and hamlets on the border territory of Honduras and Guatemala, not far from the ruins of Copan.
  • (TG) Chrestos {Greek}. The early Gnostic form of Christ. It was used in the fifth century B.C. by Aeschylus, Herodotus, and others. The Manteumata pythochresta, or the “oracles delivered by a Pythian god” through a pythoness, are mentioned by the former (Choeph. 901). Chresterion is not only “the seat of an oracle”, but an offering to, or for, the oracle. Chrestes is one who explains oracles, “a prophet and soothsayer”, and Chresterios one who serves an oracle or a god. The earliest Christian writer, Justin Martyr, in his first Apology, calls his co-religionists Chrestians. “It is only through ignorance that men call themselves Christians instead of Chrestians ,” says Lactantius Christ and Christians, spelt originally Chrest and Chrestians, were borrowed from the Temple vocabulary of the Pagans. Chrestos meant in that vocabulary a disciple on probation, a candidate for hierophantship. When he had attained to this through initiation, long trials, and suffering, and had been “anointed” (i.e., “rubbed with oil”, as were Initiates and even idols of the gods, as the last touch of ritualistic observance), his name was changed into Christos, the “purified”, in esoteric or mystery language. In mystic symbology, indeed, Christes, or Christos, meant that the “Way”, the Path, was already trodden and the goal reached; when the fruits of the arduous labour, uniting the personality of evanescent clay with the indestructible INDIVIDUALITY, transformed it thereby into the Immortal EGO. “At the end of the Way stands the Chrestes”, the Purifier, and the union once accomplished, the Chrestos, the “man of sorrow”, became Christos himself. Paul, the Initiate, knew this, and meant this precisely, when he is made to say, in bad translation: “I travail in birth again until Christ be formed in you” (Gal. iv. 19), the true rendering of which is “until ye form the Christos within yourselves”. But the profane who knew only that Chrestes was in some way connected with priest and prophet, and knew nothing about the hidden meaning of Christos, insisted, as did Lactantius and Justin Martyr, on being called Chrestians instead of Christians. Every good individual, therefore, may find Christ in his “inner man” as Paul expresses it (Ephesians. iii. 16, 17), whether he be Jew, Mussulman, Hindu, or Christian. Kenneth Mackenzie seemed to think that the word Chrestos was a synonym of Soter, “an appellation assigned to deities, great kings and heroes,” indicating “Saviour,” — and he was right. For, as he adds: “It has been applied redundantly to Jesus Christ, whose name Jesus or Joshua bears the same interpretation. The name Jesus, in fact, is rather a title of honour than a name — the true name of the Soter of Christianity being Emmanuel, or God with us Great divinities among all nations, who are represented as expiatory or self-sacrificing, have been designated by the same title The Asklepios (or Aesculapius) of the Greeks had the title of Soter.
  • (KT) Chrestos {Greek} The early gnostic term for Christ. This technical term was used in the fifth century B. C. by aeschylus, Herodotus and others. The Manteumata pythocresta, or the “Oracles delivered by a Pythian God” through a pythoness, are mentioned by the former (Cho. 901), and Pythocrestos is derived from chrao. Chresterion is not only “the test of an oracle,” but an offering to, or for, the oracle. Chrestes is one who explains oracles, a “prophet and soothsayer,” and Chresterios, one who serves an oracle or a God. The earliest Christian writer, Justin Martyr, in his first Apology, calls his co-religionists Chrestians. “It is only through ignorance that men call themselves Christians, instead of Chrestians,” says Lactantius Christ and Christians, spelt originally Chrest and Chrestians, were borrowed from the Temple vocabulary of the Pagans. Chrestos meant, in that vocabulary, “a disciple on probation,” a candidate for hierophantship; who, when he had attained it, through Initiation, long trials and suffering, and had been anointed (i. e., “rubbed with oil,” as Initiates and even Idols of the Gods were, as the last touch of ritualistic observance), was changed into Christos — the “purified” in esoteric or mystery language. In mystic symbology, indeed, Christes or Christos meant that the “way,” the Path, was already trodden and the goal reached; when the fruits of the arduous labour, uniting the personality of evanescent clay with the indestructible INDIVIDUALITY, transformed it thereby into the immortal EGO. “At the end of the way stands the Christes,” the Purifier; and the union once accomplished, the Chrestos, the “man of sorrow” became Christos himself. Paul, the Initiate, knew this, and meant this precisely, when he is made to say in bad translation, “I travail in birth again until Christ be formed in you” (Gal. iv., 19), the true rendering of which is, ” . . . . until you form the Christos within yourselves.” But the profane, who knew only that Chrestos was in some way connected with priest and prophet, and knew nothing about the hidden meaning of Christos, insisted, as did Lactantius and Justyn Martyr, on being called Chrestians instead of Christians. Every good individual, therefore, may find Christ in his “inner man,” as Paul expresses it, (Ephes. iii., 16, 17) whether he be Jew, Mussulman, Hindu or Christian.
  • (KT) Christ (see Chrestos).
  • (WG) Christos (Greek), the Higher Self, Isvara.
  • (OG) Christos — (Greek) Christos or “Christ” is a word literally signifying one who has been “anointed.” This is a direct reference, a direct allusion, to what happened during the celebration of the ancient Mysteries. Unction or anointing was one of the acts performed during the working of the rites of those ancient Mysteries in the countries surrounding the Mediterranean Sea. The Hebrew word for an anointed one is mashiahh — “messiah” is a common way of misspelling the Hebrew word — meaning exactly the same thing as the Greek word Christos.
  • Each human being is an incarnation, an imbodiment, of a ray of his own inner god — the divinity living in the core of the core of each one. The modern Christians of a mystical bent of mind call it the Christ Immanent, the immanent Christos, and they are right as far as they go, but they do not carry the thought far enough. Mystically speaking, the Christos is the deathless individuality; and when the striving personal ego becomes united permanently with this stainless individuality, the resultant union is the higher ego, “the living Christ” — a Christ among men, or as the Buddhists would say, a human or manushya-buddha. WW Christianity [[T]]he Christian religion is, as I have said, an evolution. Its most important doctrines, the Trinity, the Incarnation of the Logos, the Virgin Birth of the Savior of men, the Angelical Governance of the World — all these we have seen to be archaic pagan doctrines. I wish to emphasize one fact before we go further, that while it is undoubtedly true that everything that is in Christianity is based upon a Theosophical foundation — that is, everyone of these doctrines, at least — there is no question that these doctrines have been so modified, so stultified, so strangled in the effort to hold them, to explain them and expound them to critics, sceptics, and religious iconoclasts, that they have lost their true life. The Church has lost the key. It never had it beyond the first 75 or 100 years. It would seem as if scarcely 50 years had passed from the accepted time of birth of the founder of Christianity before disagreement and dissention began to creep in. The Christian brotherhood, which seems in its original to have been a kind of Theosophical sodality, the Theosophical Society of its day, suffered the same disintegration that we see to be almost inherent in human affairs unless indeed great men, great minds, are at the head of society. Some man of an inquiring mind, quick intellect, ambitious character, will spring up. Sincerely or insincerely, it is hard to say, perhaps both, he founds a society within the mother society, by drawing together sympathetic spirits. He is following his own desires, possibly sincere ones. He is not intellectual enough, keen enough, to see and feel the meaning, the necessity, the beauty of harmony, of the unity which makes strength. His society grows, it may separate itself from the mother society, it may start on a career of its own. If it grows, indeed, another man similar to the first one springs up in it, and we find it like the branches of a tree splitting into other branches, every little society following its own leader. Some have more real life than others. In some cases these innovations may be for the good. Many of the Christian sects seem to have been founded on a desire to get back to the original Theosophical aspect of the Christian faith from which it had so largely departed. We have thus Arianism, founded by Arius, a presbyter of Alexandria, which nearly split the Christian Church in twain, and whose doctrines were condemned at the General Council at Nicaea in 325, when the Nicene Creed, which we examined in our first and second studies, was set forth. He (Arius) thought, for instance, (and he had a great following) that Jesus was not the second person of the Trinity, which idea seemed then to be growing in Christian faith, but that he was divine in the sense of being the first creature, the first creation, of God, hence the Logos, but he was not one of the Trinity. He in fact denied the Trinity; and it was largely to condemn these doctrines of Arius that the orthodox Church, that is, those who accepted the current ideas of the day, met by order of the Emperor Constantine in 325 A.D. at Nicaea and set forth the Nicene Creed, its declaration of faith. There is a very interesting historical record about Isis (Neith). In the town of Sais, which is on the Canopic mouth of the Nile, in the Delta, in Egypt, there was a magnificent temple, and in it a statue, on which it is said there was this written, which has come down to us in Greek. (Probably it was not originally in Greek, but in the native language. It reads: “I am Isis, all which has been, which is, and shall be; and no one of mortals has ever revealed (or removed) my garment — and the fruit that I brought forth became the sun.” This line “the fruit that I brought forth became the sun”, is only reported to us by Proclus, the Neo-Platonic philosopher, though the rest of the inscription has come down to us from both Plutarch and Proclus. Now it is a very interesting fact, which has its own value, that the fruit of the womb of Mary called Virgin was Jesus, and in the Christian writers, particularly in the writers of the earlier centuries, he is connected very closely in symbology and in philosophical thought with the sun. There is a Christian hymn to Jesus Christ, to Jesus as the Christ, dating from the 6th or 7th century, which runs as follows in Latin: Verusque Sol, illabere, Micans nitore perpeti, Jubarque Sancti Spiritus Infunde nostris sensibus! [Cf. the metrical hymn of the Rig – Veda (iii, 62, 10), Tat savitur varenyam bhargo devasya dhimai dhiyo yo nah prachodayat. Literally, Let us meditate on that most excellent light of the divine Sun, that it may illumine our minds .– PLP EDS.] I ask your close attention to this: “O true Sun, go down,” — (that is, fall as the afternoon sun does; it is evidently sung to the afternoon sun) — “O thou true Sun, go down!, shining with perpetual light! Radiance of the Holy Spirit, infill our minds!” A beautiful thought. You see the sun here is called true sun, evidently marking a distinction between a true sun and lesser sun. “Shining with perpetual light; O glory of the Holy Spirit” — (the sun is the glory or radiance of the Holy Spirit, or the third person of the Trinity –), “infill our minds.” It is an invocation, a prayer, and a hymn to the Sun, as typical an example of sun-worship as could be found in any one of the so-called sun worshiping religions. The thought is very beautiful, and to a philosophical mind is perfectly clear. So we see that Jesus as late as the 6th and 7th centuries was spoken of as the true Sun and the glory of the Holy Spirit; and the Sun was looked upon as being the representative or prototype in the sky of what Jesus was among men. Now there is another curious fact which before we go on I would like to advert to. It is very little known, and unquestionably the Christian theologians did as little as they could to have it known. You will remember that in one of the chapters of Matthew it states that when Jesus was brought before Pilate, the Roman governor, he said (at least the writer called Matthew says), that there was a robber in jail called Barabbas, and that he asked the people “Who will you have, Jesus or Barabbas?” — (“Therefore when they were gathering together, Pilate said unto them, Whom will ye that I release unto you? Barabbas or Jesus who is called Christ?” ( Matthew, 27, 17) And then in verse 21: “The governor answered and said unto them, ‘Which of the twain will ye that I release unto you?’ They said ‘Barabbas’ “). Now one of the greatest, most learned, sincerest, and wisest of the Christian fathers was Origen. He lived in Alexandria at the beginning of the third century, and wrote voluminous works. He was a man of philosophical mind and his writings are very valuable for the information on early Christianity which they contain. In one of his works, a commentary on Matthew, we learn that the Bible in his day, at least Matthew in his day, tells us that the name of this Barabbas was Jesus — Jesus Barabbas. You will remember that one of the titles of Jesus, or rather one of the ways in which he is described, was “Son of the Father.” Barabbas is Syrian for “Son of the Father”; and the interesting point about that is this: that here we have one, the supposed founder of Christianity (accused of blasphemy and insurrection, according to the New Testament tale, by the Jews who sought his death at the hands of the Roman Procurator), whose name was Jesus, frequently referred to as the Son of the Father; and at the same time there was a man in jail called Jesus surnamed the Son of the Father, or insurrectionist; and for some reason for which neither legend nor history has a record, Pilate is said to have offered to give Jesus, the Son of the Father, for Jesus the Son of the Father. And he said: “Which will you have, Jesus the Son of the Father or Jesus the Son of the Father called Christ ; and they said: “Jesus, the Son of the Father.” The point to notice here is the extreme confusion which in the early days must have existed — the wheels within wheels as is shown in the variation in the Gospels, thus making their composite nature. Now Origen, from whom we have this knowledge, wishes to efface the word Jesus on the ground that “the word Jesus should not be applied to a malefactor” against the testimony of the Bible itself. He says it is improper that an evildoer should have the same name as the founder of the Christian faith. Origen was clearly disturbed — for reasons not hard to divine. Of course the name is a Hebrew name, and means “savior”; Joshua, and Jehoshua are merely variants; it is Latinized as “Jesus.” This one little fact gives a glimpse of the critical chaos into which at so early a time as Origen the Christian writings such as then existed had fallen, and of the seeming lack of knowledge which the Christians then possessed. Origen was a learned man, and Bishop Marsh, an eminent English theologian in his translation of Michaelis’ (a German writer) Introduction to the New Testament, long ago pointed out that so great was the authority of this early Christian writer Origen in the Church at that time that many of the changes he made were adopted in all subsequent editions of the Christian scriptures, and unquestionably we owe the originals of the best known of the present Greek manuscripts to Origen. You will remember that there was no printing in those days, that manuscripts were copied laboriously by hand by a class of people commonly spoken of as scribes or writers, and papyrus or parchment was costly, and therefore it required the combination of an educated man and a man of some means to issue copies or recensions of any book. So naturally when a man of such authority as Origen, a man also of means and a man of learning, set forth that such and such a thing should be, and had it copied in his own manuscripts which he spread about, we see how easy it was for any changes or emendations which Origen proposed to have taken place. WW Christianity There are a number of further points I want to cover. As regards the Virgin Birth we touched upon: one may merely say that it is a mystical theory based upon a certain philosophical principle which we will deal with later on, and which is found in different countries. We may mention Perseus, the son of the virgin Danae; and the story of Plato being the son of Perictione supposedly by the God Apollo, before she was wife in fact to her husband. Around the lives of founders of religions there are legends of many kinds. Reverence misplaced, idealism misunderstood, the attempts to make an ideal figure, all work very strongly in the human mind. The lives of all great founders of religions, even the lives of founders of philosophies, or the founders of political systems, as time goes on, become enshrouded and enveiled in marvelous tales, wondrous traditions about the way they were born, or the acts they did, or the miracles they accomplished, so that the story of Jesus as regards these is nothing singular. The Roman Church has always gone to extremes. It is said that it is the most logical of the churches, and that may perhaps be true if we can admit the premises, but the premises are frequently impossibilities, and therefore it is the most illogical in fact of the churches. For instance, its Virgin, instead of being the mythical ideal type of the ancients, was a woman, a human. So eager, apparently were the early founders of the church to have something definite, strong, appealing to set before those whom they wished to convert, that they could think of nothing better than to have an ideal figure of the type of the many ideal figures both of mother and son of antiquity. The difference was that the ancient idea was spiritual, the Christian grossly materialistic. The ‘miracles’ similar to them or different, have been treasured up by the followers of many other men. History and legend are replete with them. All the Greek heroes, all the Greek gods and demi-gods were supposed to have worked miracles of many kinds. In India, the miracles ascribed to Krishna and to the Buddha, who was also supposed to have been born of the virgin Maya (illusion — a very philosophical idea), and the miracles ascribed in ancient America to the wonderful type-figures of the New World so called, all have the same general outline: frequently also the Virgin Birth, or the immaculate birth; the legends clustering about the deliverer or savior, etc.; and the miracles he worked when he grew up and started upon his mission. Often he is rejected; frequently he is accepted; but the rule of parallelism holds good. All Heathendom, so-called, to use a Christian term, looked forward to a regeneration, to the return of the reign of Saturn, the Golden Age of Innocence, of purity, and of joy. Besides the Jews who expected this Messiah, the Persians looked forward to the coming of their Sosiosh, and the Hindus to the coming of their Kali-avatara; while the Mexicans longed for the return of their Quetzalcoatl, bringing peace, joy, and plenty in his train. The marvels of Jesus as contrasted with the miracles or wonderworkings of other saviors have one singular point; that is, they are not particularly wonderful. There were miracles worked by some of the Christian saints which were far more startling. For instance, they say that Saint Columba walked from St. Denis, a town near Paris, to Paris, carrying his head in his hand; but that cannot equal what St. Patrick did, because they say that he swam the Shannon with his head in his mouth! That certainly makes the miracles of Jesus pale into insignificance. A man who can swim a river with his head in his mouth is certainly a very wonderful thaumaturge. At the time of the beginning of the Christian era there lived another wonderworker, a remarkable man, called Apollonius of Tyana (a town in Asia Minor), whose miracles, so called, were so great and so similar to those of Jesus that it has frequently been supposed that his whole story was a forgery made by the ancients to discredit the life and work of Jesus. His life has come down to us written by Philostratus, a philosopher; and one has but to read Philostratus’ work to see the analogy. Apollonius is attended by wonders at his birth; wonders attend his upbringing; he raises the dead; he heals the sick; he vanishes out of sight when accused and on trial before the Emperor Domitian, and appears a few hours later to his disciples at Puteoli, a long distance from Rome, more than three days’ journey. Why do we hear so little of Apollonius of Tyana, why he did not also have a following, why he did not also found a religion, is one of the facts in his favor, I was going to say, but perhaps that is a little harsh. But certain it is that at the time the Christian era began the world was agape for the wonderful. New religions were springing up everywhere; the worship of Isis the virgin and of her son Horus had spread, as you will remember we said last week, all over the Roman Empire, which at that time (at the beginning of this era) included all the land from Britain to the frontiers of the Parthian Empire, and from the Scandinavian fiords to the Cataracts of Assuan (Syene, as it was then called). Any religion or philosophy which could talk long enough and insist strongly enough and clamor loud enough could not fail to get a following. It is a remarkable thing that we have no contemporary reports of Jesus whatsoever, except one (and that a forgery) in Josephus, to which I shall allude in a moment. We are told that at the crucifixion of Jesus — (if indeed there was a crucifixion, which is, as I suggested at the beginning of our study, merely one of the events belonging to the type-figure) — we are told in Matthew , 17.45, that from the sixth hour there was darkness all over the land until the ninth hour — but not a word of this marvel can be found anywhere in any contemporary writer. We are also told that the veil of the temple in Jerusalem (Jerusalem of course is not in the text) was rent in twain from the top to the bottom, and the earth did quake and the rocks rent and the graves were opened and many bodies of the saints which slept arose and came out of the graves and went into the holy city and appeared unto many. ( Matthew These are wonderful things, but not a word has come down to us outside the Christian records. Josephus was a Jew living shortly after that time, a voluminous writer, a learned man, very intimate with the Emperors Vespasian and Titus, with friends at court. He wrote the Antiquities of Judea and a History of Jewish Wars, but he makes no mention of these marvels whatsoever. Philo was another Jew of whom we have spoken, a Platonist, also a learned man, devoted to literature. Born a little before the Christian era and living for forty or fifty years afterward, he writes not a word concerning these wonders. Nor are these miracles or even the existence of Jesus mentioned by Justus of Tiberias, [See Jewish Encyclopedia ] a contemporary Jewish historian. Nor in any of the so-called pagan writers is there anything about them. We are told in St . Luke, 23, 44-46: “it was about the sixth hour and there was darkness over all the earth until the ninth hour, and the sun was darkened, and the veil of the Temple was rent in the midst.” That is all that Luke says. Now concerning what Josephus has to say about Jesus. It was for long supposed by Christians — and they quoted it as one of the rare proofs of the actuality of the life of Jesus and his mission — that this passage I am going to quote from Josephus was genuine. But the good sense of Christian critics and the impossible nature of this passage have resulted in causing it to be completely given up as testimony, and to be pronounced by the most cautious of Christian historians today as an out and out forgery. This is the passage: “Now about this time lived Jesus, a wise man, if indeed it be lawful to call him a man, for he was a doer of wonderful works, a teacher of men, who received the truth with pleasure. He drew over many among the Jews and many of the Gentiles. He was the Christ, and when Pilate at the information of the leading men among us had condemned him to the cross, those who had loved him at first did not cease to do so, for he appeared to them alive again the third day, as the divine prophets had foretold this and ten thousand other wonderful things concerning him. And the tribe of Christians was named from him, and are not extinct at this day.” ( Antiquities of the Jews Now if you can imagine an orthodox Jew, belonging to the sect of the Pharisees, calling him the Christ whom, according to the Christian records, these Jews punished with death for blasphemy, speaking of this blasphemer as the Messiah, you will see immediately that as a record this passage as it now stands, is an impossibility. It has, besides, the note of exaggeration that we also find in John , Chap. 21, last verse: “And there are also many other things which Jesus did, which, if they should be written every one, I suppose that even the world itself could not contain the books that should be written. Amen.” So much for Josephus. Pliny was a learned Roman gentleman, a friend of the Emperor Trajan. He was governor of Bithynia, 103-105 A.D., and he thus lived during the first and part of the second centuries. He was born in the year 62, but the probability is that when he issued the work which has come down to us — a collection of his letters and correspondence with the Emperor and with his friends — he was a man of some age, fifty or sixty years old; possibly about the year 110. This is only a little later than the date of Josephus. He writes in Letter No. 97, to the Emperor Trajan, a long epistle, quite unlike his usual style, about the Christians in Bithynia, and how he is dealing with them; because the Roman government was always very jealous of unauthorized associations, unauthorized sodalities, fraternities, guilds, associations of any kind. The Emperor Trajan himself had shortly before issued a rescript, that is a mandate, forbidding such associations, and endorsing to a large extent what his predecessors had done along the same line. This Letter begins by his saying that he had never been present at any trial concerning those who professed Christianity, and was unacquainted with the nature of their crime and the measure of their punishment, and how far it was proper to enter into an examination concerning them, etc. He says that certain people were accused before him as being Christians — and you will remember that the Romans cared not a rap what religion their fellow-citizens, or the countries they had conquered, had, provided they obeyed the laws — and he says he examined them, and “If they admitted it I repeated the question . . . and if they persisted I ordered them to be at once punished . . . They repeated before me an invocation to the gods and other religious rites, and offered wine and incense into the censer before the statue of the Emperor — [which would be equivalent to the gentleman of the present day bowing before the king, or kissing the hand of the Queen — nothing more than a recognition of the Imperial majesty] — and they even reviled the name of Christ; whereas there is no forcing, it is said, those who are really Christians, into any of these compliances — [This has a Christian flavor.] — “I thought it proper therefore to discharge them.” Then he goes on and gives this as their form of meeting and worship: “They all worship your statue and the images of the gods, uttering the imprecations at the same time against the name of Christ. They affirmed that the whole of their guilt or error was that they met on a stated day before dawn and addressed a form of prayer or invocation to Christ, as to a divinity — [evidently a form of solar worship] — binding themselves by a solemn oath, not for the purpose of any wicked design, but never to commit any fraud, theft, or adultery; never to falsify their word, nor to deny a trust when they should be called upon to deliver it up; after which it was their custom to separate, and then reassemble to eat in common a harmless meal.” Then Pliny goes on to say that after putting two female slaves to the question, all he could discover was “evidence of an absurd and extravagant superstition.” That is a Christian’s phrase, although found in one or two other Roman writers, because the Christians were very fond of pointing out how the ancients looked upon their religion as a superstition. Then he continues: “In fact, this contagious superstition is not confined to the cities only, but has spread its infection among the neighboring towns and country. Nevertheless, it still seems possible to restrain its progress. The temples, at least, which were once almost deserted, begin now to be frequented, and the sacred rites after a long intermission are again living, while there is a general demand for the victims which until lately found very few purchasers. From all this it is easy to conjecture what numbers might be reclaimed if a general pardon be granted to those who shall repent of their error Now the point in all this is the following: This Roman governor writes, only 60 or 70 years after the supposed death of Jesus as a malefactor, that in his province the temples of the gods are deserted, victims were scarcely ever purchased, and all the towns and neighboring country were infected with the Christian superstition, and that it is possible to restrain its progress; and yet we know by contemporary history that later years show no such wonderful dissemination of the Christian religion in that district. If this is based upon a genuine letter of Pliny to Trajan, I feel convinced that it has either been grossly changed and meddled with, or that there is some other explanation at present unknown to me, different from the sense of the letter. Were these people followers of elithroism? The style is different from the rest of Pliny’s letters; the elegance, the literary terseness, the large mindedness of the Roman gentleman are all absent. He is addicted in this letter to strong adjectives; he takes an attitude of partisanship against something which on the face of it to him was nothing but a superstition, etc. It is interesting, therefore, to see that Trajan’s answer to Pliny would go to show that this letter (how much of it is genuine we know not) is probably a change or modification of some original, because Trajan in answering it says: “You have taken the right course, my dearest Secundus, in investigating the charges against the Christians who were brought before you. It is not possible to lay down any general rule for all such cases. Do not go out of your way to look for them. If indeed they should be brought before you and the crimes proved — [you will remember that it was a criminal act under Roman law to hold private, secret meetings — not the crime of their being Christians but the crime of their disobeying the law] — they must be punished, with the restriction, however, that where the party denied he is a Christian and shall make it evident that he is not by invoking our gods — [this again has a Christian touch] — let him, notwithstanding any former suspicion, be pardoned, upon his repentance. Anonymous information ought not to be accepted in any trials, under any circumstances. It is introducing a very dangerous precedent and is entirely foreign to the spirit of our age.” (Letter 98) Later we may have to go into this subject more profoundly, and we shall see that these tales of diabolical persecution by the pagans, and of such sweet-spirited serenity and willing martyrdom by the Christians are largely, like so much else, faked testimony. Now as regards the crucifixion of Jesus. You will probably recollect that crucifixion was a Roman form of punishment for malefactors of a certain class: the lowest class of malefactors only were crucified. We may look upon it as a barbarous and horrid form of punishment for an enlightened people to have, but I doubt if it be worse than our barbarous method of hanging a man by the neck until he be dead, or the other barbarous punishments which in the most Christian era of Europe were too common, such as boiling a man in oil. The cross had many forms, but the usual form was what is called the Roman cross an upright stake with a transverse board; and frequently, where the crotch of the man would be, there was a projection, on which the criminal would rest or ride, or towards the foot of the cross there was a horizontal piece set into it, so that he would stand on it. Sometimes the hands were nailed, sometimes they were merely tied, and he was left to die of starvation, which in itself is not a particularly fearful death. Guards were stationed around the cross of punishment to see that the friends of the criminal did not carry him off, and there was strong probability to suppose, from instances in the writings of the Romans which have come down to us, that soporific draughts were given to the criminals before the crucifixion to dull the pain and send them to sleep. If Jesus, according to the story, had been tried for blasphemy, by Jewish law he would have been stoned to death and then perhaps hanged upon a tree, (see the Talmud) as had happened before, and in this stoning to death also the victim was probably given an opiate of some kind, a soporific drink, possibly not always, but it was doubtless frequently so. The whole story of the crucifixion in the Christian Gospel does not bear the stamp of truth. We cannot conceive of a Roman procurator — proud of his nation, filled with the pride of his birth and his training, looking upon the Syrians as all the Romans did with a feeling akin to contempt — acting as Pilate did, if indeed Pilate was the Roman magistrate at the time Jesus died, and if indeed Jesus died as it is said he did. This very Pilate is supposed to have aroused an insurrection among the Jews by his contemptuous treatment of them. Pilate is said to have washed his hands and said: “What is truth?” A natural question enough, showing him a philosopher, possibly of the New Academy, or of the Epicurean sect, if indeed he made the remark. It is a question which is asked by men today and always will be asked, I suppose, as long as men think. Jesus is supposed to have lived 33 years. The early Christians, or at least some of them, gave the time of his ministry as one year, which Irenaeus ( Refutation, II, 23, 5-6) condemns; and the accepted opinion today among pious Christians is that his mission lasted three years, and that he was crucified in his 33rd year. The idea of the early Christians ( Clementine Homilies, XVII, 9; also of the Gnostics) that his mission lasted 12 months and that he died in the 12th month is evidently a form of the work or destiny of the solar god through the twelve months of the year. It has an analogy, mystical perhaps, with the twelve labors of Hercules, he being connected with the sun, as is well known. Now Irenaeus was an early Christian Father living in the 2nd century, and he tells us in his work which has come down to us called The Refutation of all Heresies (II, 22, 5-6) that those people who say that Jesus perished as a young man, 30 odd years of age, are all wrong, because he came as a type-figure, a symbol, of perfect man; and as he was a child to little children and a youth to youth and man to man, so he must have been an old man to the aged. And he declares on the testimony of John, the disciple of Jesus, and of the Presbyters, who heard it from John in Asia Minor, that Jesus’ ministry lasted twenty years, and that he lived to be at least 50 years old. This statement of Irenaeus has caused a great deal of discussion, and it is usually pronounced — being a very unwelcome kind of Christian testimony — to be ‘a tradition’, and you will often read, when learned and pious Christian writers discuss Irenaeus’ statement, ‘how easy it is for traditions to be misunderstood’, etc. Yet this one-year tradition is one of the very earliest. Now Jesus shortly before his death established what the Christians call the sacrament of the Last Supper. This is considered, and has been for ages, one of the greatest mysteries of the Christian faith. The Roman Catholics take the extreme view, as always, and claim that they receive their ideas of the celebration of the Communion straight down the ages from Jesus himself. The form in which the Roman Catholics accept the Communion is called transubstantiation — trans, across, substantiation, from substance, meaning that the elements of the Eucharist, that is, the bread and wine, are transformed, their substance is transformed, into the actual body and blood of Jesus Christ. Now when Luther in the 15th and 16th century started his controversial writings, he aroused a great storm. The Roman Catholic Church in those days was in a state which seriously needed medicine. It was corrupt, in some senses; the Christian spirit had gone, perhaps fortunately, one can hardly say; but such was the outbreak, such was the clamor of discontent, that this, occurring at the time of the revival of learning, made things very precarious for the Roman Catholic See. So they finally called a Council which they claimed to be Ecumenical, or general, and which assembled at the little town not far from the Italian frontier today and on the line of the railroad running over the Brenner Pass. This Council assembled on December 13th, 1545, and lasted with intermissions until December 4, 1563. It was several times suspended, one suspension lasting nine years. And at this Council were condemned the leading doctrines of the Reformation concerning the Bible, original sin, etc. The decrees of this Council were confirmed by Pope Pius IV in January, 1564. It was composed, according to one reckoning, of 3 patriarchs, 7 cardinals, 33 archbishops, 35 bishops — 278 in all. Others give the number in all as 4 cardinal legates, 2 other cardinals, 25 archbishops, 166 bishops, 7 abbots, 7 generals of order, 39 proxies of bishops — 252. Now the decrees of this Council gave a definite and set form to the doctrines of the Roman Church for future time; gave them a firm ground to stand upon. Among them was the question of the celebration of the Communion or Eucharist, in connection with which the word transubstantiation is used. The word itself first occurs in the 11th century, and was used in the controversy about the nature of the Eucharist between La France, who was Archbishop of Canterbury and Italian born in Padua, and Berengarius, a Latinized form of the French Berenger, Canon of Tours, in France. Berengarius denied the real presence of the actual body and blood of Jesus Christ in the Eucharist; La France, the Italian Englishman, asserted it. Berengarius was born in 998, and died at Tours in 188. He was condemned on account of his opposition to the real presence in the Eucharist by several Synods, and he several times recanted these views. La France was born in 1005 and died at Canterbury in 1085. He was a friend and counsellor of William the Conqueror. The discussion concerning the nature of the real presence of Jesus in the Eucharist began in the 9th century. Now transubstantiation as a doctrine was approved by the Council of Rome in 1079. At the Fourth Lateran Council in Rome under Pope Innocent III, this doctrine was declared to be an article of faith. The Greek Church accepted an identical or closely similar doctrine to transubstantiation at the Council of Jerusalem in 1672. The Swiss Zwingli, much later, about the time of Calvin and Luther in the 15th and 16th centuries, taught that the Eucharist was merely in commemoration of the Supper of the Lord Jesus, that there was no real presence and that the bread and the wine were merely symbols of the partaking of the divine nature of Jesus by the pure in heart. Luther taught the real presence, as it is called: that the body and blood of Jesus Christ existed in the Eucharist, but in some unexplained way. He denied that the elements of the Eucharist became the body and blood of Jesus. Calvin taught that by faith the true believer received Jesus Christ’s body and blood; merely receiving as it were the heavenly power from the glorified body of Jesus in Heaven; and Calvin’s views were generally admitted by the reformed Churches. The Roman Catholics believe what is set forth in the decrees of the Council of Trent, and I will quote parts of them verbatim: “In the sacrament of the Holy Eucharist, after the consecration of the bread and wine, our Lord Jesus Christ, true God and man, is truly, really and substantially contained in the species [that is to say, the appearance] of these sensible things.” ( Canons and Decrees of the Church Council at Trent “By the consecration of the bread and wine the whole substance of the bread is changed into the body of Christ and the whole substance of the blood; which change is truly and fitly called transubstantiation by the Holy Catholic Church.” (Section XIII, chap. IV). Again: “Under each species [that is to say, under the bread or under the wine], and under each particle of each substance, [that is, under any crumb or fragment which may be partaken of], Christ is contained, whole and entire.” In other words, the Roman Catholics believe that in the bread and in the wine which compose the Eucharist they eat the body of Jesus and drink his blood. Therefore they are theophagists — they eat their god and drink his blood. So strongly do they feel the nature of this sacrament that, perhaps unconsciously, they have a defiant attitude and call it the “holiest and greatest mystery of their faith.” It certainly is. Now Anglican views are divided into the High Church and the Low Church. Generally speaking they follow the line of Calvin. So does the Presbyterian Church, which is also the Scottish Church. But the High Churchmen of the Anglicans have a view which approximates rather closely to that of the Roman Catholics. For instance, Blunt, in his Dictionary of Theology, p. 761, says as follows: “That the body and blood of Christ exists in those elements [that is to say, in the bread and wine) is as much the belief of the English Church as of the Latin and Greek Churches.” And Pusey, who was a famous High Churchman of the Anglican Communion, in his Eirenicon, p. 229, says that “the difference between Anglicans and Romanists is more a dispute about words than a difference in things.” That is the extreme High Church view, but it may be said that the general Anglican view is fairly that of Calvin, to wit: that by faith the true believer receives spiritually the body and blood of his Savior, not that the bread and wine become actually the body and blood of Jesus Christ. The Romanists say that the reason the bread does not look and taste and smell like flesh, and the wine does not look and smell and taste like blood, is because while the substances are changed into the body and blood, yet what are called the accidents , that is, the form and shape and taste and smell of the bread and wine, remain. Now in the early Christian church there seems to have always been a form of the celebration of the Eucharist. In the primitive church, as far as can be known, it was very simple. Almost anybody seems to have been permitted to celebrate, as in the case of friends leaving on a journey from home, and in case of marriages or deaths, possibly; on almost any unusual event happening, they broke bread and drank wine with a prayer. But as time went on, the craving for marvels and the degeneration of the age, the going to sleep of the intellectual nature of man, and the strong development of the love of wonder, worked so forcefully that gradually there grew up a view, an opinion, a feeling, that when Jesus Christ made his last supper, according to the Gospels, with his disciples, he meant it as a type for all good Christians to follow afterwards, and at all times, and that where bread was broken and wine was drunk with a prayer or consecration by the deacon, it partook of a spiritual, divine character or nature; and this view developed more and more until it has now blossomed out into what we see to be the doctrine of the Roman Catholic Church. The mere fact of the partaking of bread and wine (or water) in the name of a god, was not uncommon. The worship of Mithras originated in Persia, or at least became known to the Greeks as from Persia, after the wars of Alexander. It possessed among its other more common rites a Eucharist consisting of bread and water, and a great many of the early Christians also celebrated their Eucharist with bread and water, or bread and water mixed with wine, which latter continued later in the Middle Ages of the Western Church. Mithraism extended all over the Roman Empire, so much so that at one time it might readily have become the dominating religion and have ousted Christianity in the same way that Christianism ousted Mithraism. Medallions or remains of the worship of Mithra have been found in France, Germany, Ireland, England, Egypt, Italy, Spain, Greece, Asia Minor, everywhere. The followers of Mithraism taught that their God was closely connected with the sun, the spiritual force of the sun, as it were, the great light of the world, enlightening the intellects and spirits of men as the sun lighted the material abode of men, the earth. They had a mystical system of initiation, divided into seven degrees; they had a baptism with water in the name of God; they had a Eucharist as I have said, celebrated with bread and water. Justin the Martyr, of whom I have spoken previously today, says it must have been the devil that did all this, so closely ‘copying’ the Christian rites. As Mithraism existed several hundred years before Christianity was born, possibly the Devil did it by anticipation. But as far as we know, Mithraism could never have been said to have taught that the bread was the body of the sun and the water his solar force. We see, therefore, that so far as regards the “greatest mystery of the Christian faith,” in other words, the Eucharist, it was celebrated by Persians, by Greeks, by Romans, Egyptians, Syrians, Germans, Gauls, Britons, Irishmen, followers of Mithraism at the time of the Christian era. And there is strong reason to believe that in the Mysteries celebrated at Eleusis, bread and wine were used as symbolical, bread of the Goddess Ceres, wine of the God Bacchus, celebrated mystically. And we also know from the writings of the Christian priests who accompanied the Spanish soldiery who conquered Mexico under Cortes the Bandit, that the Mexicans celebrated a Eucharist in the name of their God Huitzilpochtli. [Quetzalcoatl] As the Spanish soldiers could not pronounce his name, they called him “Ocho Lobos” (Eight Wolves) — not a bad name for so sanguinary a god. Huitzilpochtli was a god of war, and of the sun, and while the gory rites of human sacrifice undoubtedly existed in an abhorrent degree in Mexico, nevertheless there was a side of the religion which demanded great purity and asceticism among those who followed it. Its Eucharist was partaken of by people, and consisted of a human figure made of maize, Indian corn (a bread), mixed with the blood of the victim slain to the god — a singular analogy with the other victim slain on the cross of the Christians whose blood is drunk in the Eucharist. So great was the resemblance that the Spanish padres did not know how to explain it. The Mexicans had their Eucharist, and their Savior; they had their Virgin Birth. So the Spaniards ascribed it either to the wiles of the devil or to the pious labors of Saint Tomas — a great traveller; and whenever they came across anything like this they said it was due to the hard-working Saint. It is interesting to remember that when the Spanish banditti arrived in Mexico, although they did put a stop to the terrible custom of human sacrifice, they found a civilization there which was more advanced than their own in some ways. The cities were well policed and kept clean, and in those days the cities of France and Italy were in a shocking state, with mud ankle-deep in the principal streets of the capitals of Europe; it was a common custom to throw sewage and night-soil out of the windows on to the head of any unfortunate traveller who might be passing below. The Mexican cities, on the other hand, were well lighted at night, and the Spaniards found a system of religion, comprising, as I have said, all the essential principles, considered from the mystical standpoint, that they could find in their own, and a priesthood devoted to study, not merely to masses and orisons, but to study and teaching. They found a legal system composed of judges administering justice in the name of the King; they found a calendar correct to within a day or two; where as at the time of the arrival of the Spaniards in Mexico the common calendar as used by them was eleven or twelve days in advance of the true date. Truly, “wonderful are the ways of Karman!” It seems to me that when we are present together here, in a sense we are on holy ground. In ancient days, when the subjects which we are now studying were taken up, there was observed, as we said in opening this series of studies, an attitude of reverence and devotion not only towards the higher beings in nature, which were called gods or spirits, as the occasion may be, but also by the students towards each other, a sense of reverence towards our very selves, as being incarnations of divine beings, sleeping gods, gods asleep in the flesh, for according to Oriental methods of study the students assembled with a mind filled with thankfulness and a species of joy, by putting themselves in the proper state of mind, come nearer to the beings from whom we draw our higher principles. In ancient days all initiations were held in the temples or groves, [Groves in Hebrew is AShR, asher, [ See Zohar (Wizards Bookshelf, 1979) p. 211] meaning happy or blessed. See S . D . references thereon. — J.D.] or, in the northern countries, under the spreading boughs of some majestic oak; or they might have been held as sometimes in India, for instance, under the sky, the roof of the world as it was expressed. They saw in that a symbol of the encompassing life, and themselves types or symbols of the hierarchy of beings which move things in nature. And so we, in our way, according to the methods of this century and according to the evolution or rather according to the status of evolution which we have, approach these majestic studies, or at least we should do so, with the same reverence for them and for each other. And these studies do not mean only the Theosophical studies strictly speaking, but also the different religions or religious philosophies of the earth, which contain or enshrine the aspirations of those who have gone before us, who are or rather have been, ourselves; and in studying them we come with the thoughts which we thought and the aspirations which we had, and I dare say that there is no religion and no religious philosophy and no science which in itself could be unfamiliar to us, to our higher natures. Memory is the fountain of recollection or remembrance of the things stored in our higher natures. So therefore, in taking up a study apparently, as it may seem to some, so untheosophical as the one we studied last week, we really are studying a branch of the activities of the human mind, and we get back into the ideas and ideals which brought about the fabric which is called Christianity now. With this preface I would like to continue our study of Jesus the man and Jesus the type-figure, taking up the Jewish historical or semi-historical records of the Syrian sage, and touching lightly upon the Mohammedan teachings regarding him, and still more lightly, because they will come up later, on the apocryphal Christian writings conveyed to us about him. Of course the Jews rejected and reject the Christian claims that Jesus the Nazarene, so called, was their Messiah. They have done so consistently, and the conversions from Judaism to Christianity have not been many. You will remember that we spoke of the rather extraordinary fact that there were no contemporary records either of Jesus or of the works which he was supposed to have done — except one, which was found in Josephus, and was a forgery. There is a personal description of Jesus, formerly usually printed at the beginning of most of the editions of the Gospels, and often printed by itself, purporting to be a letter from a Roman called Lentulus, who was supposed to have been the predecessor of Pontius Pilate as the governor of the Roman province of Judea; but this also is now completely given up as a pious forgery probably dating from some time in the early Middle Ages. The language is very poetic, rather enthusiastic; so much so that that has been one of the arguments against its authenticity, because no Roman official would write that way to the Senate. He must either have been a Christian, or the letter a forgery, and as he was not a Christian, the letter is de facto called spurious. The Jews have a number of written traditions of Yeshu, refusing to give him the full spelling of the Hebrew word for Savior, Yeshua , because, so they said, that being the name of the Savior, it should not be applied to a blasphemer. The Talmud is the great repository in which is found the general rule of life for the Jews. It contains ordinances of conduct, ethical precepts, paraphrases and explanations of obscure passages in the law, that is to say, in the Pentateuch, and other matters. It seems to have first originated in the 5th century before this era, and to have been carried on until the 3rd century. The original writings of the Talmud were called the Mishnah . These were the oldest writings, but taking the writings Mishnah as a text the Jewish doctors, that is to say the learned men of the Jews, have written Gemaras, (a word which means complement or completion ). There are two Gemaras, the Babylonian Gemara and the so-called Jerusalem Gemara, because after the taking and destruction of Jerusalem, the Jews carried the sacred writings of their schools to two principal places, Babylon on the Euphrates, and Tiberias in Palestine. Each of these schools had a patriarch, so-called, who was the head of it, and each school, by the efforts of its own commentators and learned men built up a Gemara on the Mishnah common to both. You will frequently hear the Babylonian Talmud spoken of, or the Jerusalem Talmud; that means, as you have seen, that the Mishnah is common to both, but that the Gemara comes from one or the other of the schools respectively. From the Babylonian Gemara — (I have made some notes here which I will thread together) — to the Mishnah of the Tractate Sabbath says: “They stoned the son of Stada [Satda] [“Satda” from Aramaic STDA related to the Hebrew root STH or STA, to be faithless, to deviate from the proper path. — J.D.] in Lud, and then they crucified him on the evening before the Passover. This son of Stada was the son of Pandirah [Stada means ‘unfaithful’]; Rabbi Chasda has said that the husband of Stada was the master of Pandirah, that is, Paphes, the son of Yehudah. Now how could Stada become his mother? His mother was a hairdresser for women. As is said in Pembeditha [a Babylonian school] she was unfaithful to her husband.” There is a gloss or paraphrase of this, which says, “How came it to be that Stada [or Satda, as it is sometimes written] was his mother? This way, says Rabbi Chasda: Miriam [which is the same as Mary], mother of Pandirah, dressed Satda’s hair . . . . Stada became a mother by Pandirah, Miriam’s son. As said in Pompeditha ‘Stada by name, and Stada [which means “unfaithful”] by nature’.” Here Pandirah in this paraphrase is the son of Mary, who is thus Yeshu’s or Jesus’ grandmother. Again, the Babylonian Gemara on the Mishnah of Tractate Sanhedrin, folio 43, remarks that there was a tradition that they crucified Jesus, Yeshua, on the eve of the Sabbath. Again in Mishnah tractate Sabbath, folio 104, a rule exists against making marks on the skin. On this the Babylonian Gemara says: “The son of Stada made the marks of magic on his skin, and brought them thus out of Egypt.” In the Babylonian Gemara, tractate Sanhedrin, folio 107, it is recorded that when King Alexander Janaeus persecuted the rabbis, Rabbi Jehosua ben Perahhia [that is, Jehoshua, son of Perahhia] fled with his disciple Yoshu or Jesus to Egypt, where both learned magic. Alexander Jannaeus, son of John Hyrcanus, was king of the Jews from 104 to 77 B.C. Now Jehoshua ben Perahhia is a historical character, and was a member of the Sanhedrin under Alexander Jannaeus. This is all that the Talmud says directly about this character called Yeshua the son of Stada. There are a number of other allusions to him in the Talmud, but it is not needful to quote them for our present purpose. I have threaded these allusions together and when you get the report of our study today you will be able to see the connection more easily than you can now, my object being to show that in the Talmud there was a Jesus called the son of Stada and the son of Pandirah, who is supposed to have gone to Egypt under the Rabbi Jehoshua ben Perahhia, and to have studied magic there. Now about the 13th century of this era it began to be known among the bigoted Christians of the day that the Jews had certain writings in which Jesus was spoken of, and it naturally excited no little interest and a large amount of harsh feelings. It soon became known that these writings spoke in no complimentary terms of the Jesus the Son of Stada connected with the Mary of the Christians. There are two versions of the general subject, the subject being called “The Birth of Jesus,” commonly known under the Hebrew name “Toledoth Yeshu . ” These were published and I believe translated into Latin by two learned scholars. The first one was Wagenseil’s edition in 1681, printed at Altdorf, and the other was Huldreich’s, printed at Leyden in 1705. Wagensell, whose edition we will very briefly consider today, because the two versions, while differing very greatly in details are based upon the same general theme, gives a subtitle to his edition as follows: “The Fiery Darts of Satan, that is to say, secret and horrible tales of the Jews against Christ God, and the Christian Religion.” Wagenseil’s edition commences as follows: “In the year of the world 4761 [that is, according to Jewish reckoning, 910 B.C.!!] under King Jannaeus, a misfortune befell Israel. A profligate named Joseph Pandirah then arose. He was handsome, strong, well-made, but spent his time in robbery and hurt to others. He lived in Bethlehem, in Judaea. A widow lived near him who had a daughter, named Miriam [or Mary]. This Miriam dressed women’s hair, and is spoken of in the Talmud.” It then goes on to say that she became the mother of Yeshu [of Jesus] by Pandirah. Yeshu after a number of years goes into the temple, in search of the Incommunicable Name, cuts open his flesh and places therein the Unutterable Name which he has written on a piece of parchment. He works miracles through his possession of knowledge of the Incommunicable Name. Throughout the Toledoth he is called “The Fatherless”, doubtless an allusion to his birth. Now there was one Judas, an Elder of Israel; he goes also into the Temple, in search of the Wonderful Name, so that he may overthrow the Fatherless, and he gets it and he works counter miracles against Yeshua or Jesus, to overthrow him. He does overthrow Yeshua or Jesus, who is finally seized and incarcerated. He escapes through the connivance of his disciples, of whom he had gained a following, washes himself in the Jordan, upon which his magic power returns to him. He then works more miracles; he causes milestones to float on the water, upon one of which he places himself and teaches; he feeds multitudes with fishes, and works many other wonderful miracles. Judas again lays a trap for him and catches him in sleep, and cuts out of his flesh the parchment upon which the Wonderful Name had been written. This of course deprives the Fatherless of his magical power, and he finally comes to so bad a pass that he has to wear a crown of thorns. He thirsts and is given vinegar to drink, and utters the exclamation “My God, My God, why hast thou forsaken me?” He is sentenced finally to be stoned and hanged on a tree. It was the eve of the Passover. He is taken out of the city and stoned until dead. Judas hides his body under a running stream by first diverting the waters and then allowing them to return into their channel. But his disciples take immediate advantage of this move of Judah, the Jewish Elder, by saying exactly as Yeshu had said, “He is now risen to Heaven, because his body cannot be found.” Great excitement prevails, and to still it Judas draws the body from the bed of the brook, attached to a horse’s tail, through the streets. Finally Simon Peter, one of Jesus’ disciples in his turn gets into the Temple and gets the Wonderful Name, and gives himself out as speaking for Yeshu; he gets a following and finally dies highly respected in a tower built for him in the city, six years later. The Toledoth Yeshu ends here. The second Toledoth Yeshu, edited by Huldreich, is possibly more full of marvels than the first, but agrees, in all principal points, as for instance, that Yeshu was the son of Miriam by Pandirah. It is of course unnecessary to point out that these tales are full of absurdities and anachronisms; as for instance the birth of the son of Stada is given in the year 4671, [See above, viz. 4761. The year 1980 A.D. is 5700 on the Hebrew calendar. Therefore 910 B.C. is 2750 in the Hebrew. Toledoth Yeshu is unavailable; consequently this discrepancy could not be clarified. — J.D.] which corresponds to 910 B.C., and at the same time “Queen Helena”, the wife of Alexander Jannaeus of the 1st century, B.C. is supposed to have seen and spoken with Yeshu during his life. Now these tales, with the exception of the Talmud itself, which is a sober work, could be dismissed as mere fabrication of feeling, if it were not for the fact that so far back in the Christian era as the 2nd Century we find Origen, the Christian Father, alluding to them. In his work against Celsus, the philosopher, whom you will remember we adverted to last week as having written a work against the Christian religion called The True Word, Origen quotes (Bk. 1, Chap. 32) Celsus as saying that a certain soldier named Panthera, which is merely the Grecized form of Pandirah, committed adultery with Mary, upon which the carpenter turned her out of doors. And again, (1, 59) Celsus argues that one Panthera corrupted Mary, and he further says “the body of God would not have generated as you were.” This shows that as early as the first or second century these rumors were current not only among the Jews but among the Greeks and the early Christians. Three or four centuries later there lived and wrote a Christian saint called Epiphanius, and in his work against heresies (the early Christians were particularly fond of writing against heresies, which included every belief that was not their own) he actually gives a genealogy of Jesus as believed in by Christians, at least some Christians — in which Jacob Panthera is the father — of two sons, Joseph and Cleophas. Joseph married Mary, and from Mary was born Jesus. So even as late, then, as the 4th century, we find that Christians had accepted the fact that in some way this man Pandirah was connected with, or was a relation in some fashion of, their Savior. To sum up: from what we have said it would seem that however much the Toledoth Yeshu of the Middle Ages may have been based on visionary theorizing, possibly dictated by hatred of the Christians, at whose hands the Jews had suffered so greatly, nevertheless taking into consideration the fact that the Talmud does mention the fact that the son of Stada and Pandira was called Jesus, and lived somewhere about the time of the beginning of this era, possibly a hundred years before in the reign of King Alexander Jannaeus; and in view of the fact that Origen in the 2nd century finds it of sufficient importance to go to the pains of arguing against it, quoting the statement twice, as if uneasy at its circulating in the world; and in view of the fact that in the 4th century another Christian saint, Epiphanius, gives a Christian genealogy in which this man Pandirah is given as the grandfather of Jesus, it would seem that there must be some basis of fact. What that basis of fact may be no one can say, but it is not the baseless fabric of a vision to believe that Joseph Pandirah was in some fashion connected with the story of Jesus the Man. Of course the name Jesus was a common enough name in Judaea; Joshua and Jehoshua were merely variants. It is thought by some Christian scholars that there unquestionably did live a Pandirah who was a lover or husband or grandmother of a Mary (because the name Pandirah is a feminine form which has led to his being considered Before we dismiss the subject of the birth of Jesus, I would like to call your attention again to two or three things as recorded or rather spoken of in the canonical gospels (canonical, of course, from “canon”, an accepted rule and on, there is a great deal of interesting matter. For instance, 3, 13: “And he goeth up into a mountain, and calleth unto him whom he would; and they came unto him. And he ordained twelve that they should be with him, and that he might send them forth to preach, and to have power to heal sicknesses, and to cast out devils.” That ends verse 15. Then he changes the names of his disciples. “Then they went into a house, and the multitude was so great that they could not so much as eat bread.” (verse 20). Now verse 21: “And when his relations heard of this they went out to lay hold of him: for they said, ‘He is mad’.” And in verse 31 we have: “There came then his brethren and his mother, and standing without, sent unto him, calling him. And he answered, Who is my mother, or my brethren?” (Verse 33). Now is it conceivable that him of whom it had been announced to the Virgin through the angel of God that he was God himself, the son of God, they should seek to restrain from pursuing the course which it was natural that he should pursue, gathering around himself disciples and sending them out to preach? Inconsistency No. 1. In Chapter 2 of Luke, verse 33, we have this: “And Joseph and his mother marvelled at those things which were spoken of him.” The best manuscripts do not say Joseph, they have the words “his father”, which imports a sense tremendously different: “And his father and his mother marvelled at those things which were spoken of him.” In verse 41, same chapter: “Now his parents went to Jerusalem every year at the feast of the Passover.” And in verse 43, “. . . and Joseph and his mother knew not of it.” In other manuscripts they have: “. . . his parents knew not of it.” These readings, differing from the accepted version of King James, have been adopted by the eminent English scholars Westcotte and Hort, and the readings “Joseph and his mother” are put in an appendix under the heading “Noteworthy rejected readings.” Now in Matthew, I, verse 16, the genealogy to which we referred last week ends: “And Jacob begat Joseph, the husband of Mary, of whom was born Jesus who is called Christ.” In the best Greek manuscript we have, one of the oldest and the only complete uncial, the Sinaitic, manuscript, taken from the name of the mountain Sinai where it was found, this verse ends as follows: “Joseph, to whom was betrothed Mary, the virgin, begat Jesus, who is called the Christ.” That, of course, makes Jesus the seed of David, and while it is contrary to the accepted canonical Gospels, which both in the originals and in the translations have been accepted as inspired both in text and words, nevertheless it proves, if it be accepted as a standard of authority, that Jesus called the Christ was not born of a Virgin but was born of Mary and Joseph. I may, therefore, call your attention to a quotation which I have taken from Prof. J. Estlin Carpenter, Oxford, in his book The Bible in the 19th Century , p. 494, where he says: “Those who believe that Joseph was the father of Jesus have the authority of the Gospels as fully as those who ascribe his birth to the direct intervention of the Holy Spirit.” And we may dismiss the subject of Jesus’ birth by referring to a remarkable inscription cut on one of the inner walls of the temple of Luxor, in which the god Amen, one of the mightiest, greatest, and oldest of the Gods in the Egyptian pantheon, is represented as standing by the side of a virgin, wife of the king or betrothed of the king, and telling her that that thing which was in her womb was himself, filled with his own soul. The circumstances [I have seen it myself ] are written out with rather a singular elaborateness. Amenhotep III, of the 18th dynasty, is the king to whom this virgin birth is ascribed. Now it may interest you to know that about the middle of the last century, the discontent both among continental and American Protestant churches at the constant attacks which were made on the translation of the various versions — that is the version of King James, both of the New Testament and the Old — was so strong that it eventuated in an assembling of some of the most learned biblical scholars of Great Britain and of this country to get out an improved translation of the Bible, both of the Old Testament and the New. Co-operation was invited by the originators of the movement from eminent scholars in all parts of the world, and the British and American revisers sat, I believe, at the same time. The British scholars were divided into two companies, one for the Old Testament and one for the New, sitting in London; and the Americans of course, sitting in this country. Later the American translation and suggestions were sent to England and a large number of the suggestions were placed, I believe, as an appendix to the new translation when published. Now the number of manuscripts upon which the translators had to work (that is, manuscripts of the New Testament) numbered some 3,000, but very few of them were complete. Some of them only consisted of portions of the New Testament, and the Sinaitic manuscript is the only uncial which shows no gaps. Now as regards the age of the manuscripts, the latest date only from the 4th or 5th centuries, that is to say from 300 to 400 years after the time that Jesus is supposed to have lived and carried out his mission. There are only two dating from the 4th century: that is to say, the Vatican manuscript of Rome, and the Sinaitic at Petersburg; and there are but two which date from the 5th century, the Alexandrine in the British Museum, and the Codex of Ephrahem in the Library National at Paris. The large majority of the balance of the manuscripts date from the 9th century, 800 years after the time of Jesus. With regard to the manuscripts of the Old Testament, there are none older than the 10th century, and there is a difference of some 500 or 600 years between the oldest Hebrew and the oldest Greek manuscripts. The reason for that seems to be that according to Jewish custom, in fact, I believe, law, every manuscript or roll, as soon as it began to show wear or the letters to become in the slightest degree illegible or torn, was immediately destroyed, the idea being thus to guarantee the full integrity of the text. It is remarkable that this being the case, a manuscript even so old as the 10th century should have been extant. Naturally enough, the manuscripts of the Old Testament would be written in Hebrew, although it was a dead language even at the time that Jesus lived, just as Latin is a dead language among us now. The language spoken when Jesus lived and worked, no matter who he was and no matter how he worked and lived the language spoken in Palestine at the time of the beginning of this era, was one of the Syriac dialects, or Aramaic, that is to say, a word coming from Aram, found in the Bible and signifying very much what is now called Syria, the land south of the Euphrates to the borders of Phoenicia. There are a number of Aramaic dialects, the Syriac Chaldes, and one or two others. The Semitic languages, of which Hebrew was one, Arabian another, and the Aramaic family of tongues a third branch, seem to have been restricted to the country bounded on the north by the Tigris, on the south by Egypt, on the west by the Mediterranean, and on the east by the Indian Ocean. If Jesus lived and spoke to his disciples as supposed, he must have used, as I have said, one of the Aramaic dialects then spoken, the common tongue of the people; and there are some interesting facts in connection with this which will come up later. He certainly could hardly have spoken Hebrew to the people, it being practically a dead tongue. Now why was it that the manuscripts of the New Testament have come down to us in Greek? If Jesus lived in Palestine, why is it that our manuscripts are not in Aramaic, in Syriac, or even in Hebrew? Some manuscripts are in Syriac, but they are of comparatively late date. There was a tradition quoted by a number of the Church Fathers that Matthew, the tax gatherer, one of Jesus’ supposed disciples, wrote his Gospel in Hebrew, whatever that may have meant, and that everyone interpreted it as he was able. It would seem from the critical labors of scholars, that from some such distant ancestor all the manuscripts we now have, have been derived, suffering great variation and distortion in the process of constant copying and translation. When Christianity spread from the immediate scene of the labors of the supposed founder, Greek being the tongue then spoken by the learned, the polite, the literary, it took that form, and if the traditions believed in by the early Christians are based on fact, the translations from the original were first made in Alexandria; at any rate, they bear an Alexandrine stamp. The language, the Greek, seems more closely allied to the Alexandrian Greek dialect than to any other; and it is fair to say that the translations themselves, show by a certain staccato style, a certain abruptness and terseness, that the early Christian tradition of their having been derived from some Semitic tongue may be true, because the Semitic tongues are built upon a less developed scheme than the Aryan tongues are; they are shorter in expression, more obscure. Now it would seem as if Christianity originated in Alexandria, from legends and traditions about a Palestine sage called Jesus; and it is certainly the fact that Alexandria, being a great melting pot of learning of the age, the second city of the Roman Empire in size, was frequented by the most learned men of all nations; Greeks, Romans, Jews, Persians, Egyptians, outlanders — all gathered there. It would seem that most of the theories which we have studied before, such as the Logos, the Trinity, the Virgin Birth, the Savior idea, and many others, originated so far as Christianity is concerned, of course, in Alexandria. The revision of the Bible began on June 22nd, 1870. There were two companies, so called, one from the New Testament and one from the Old Testament, the Old Testament being composed of 27 members, the New Testament comprising 26. The New Testament was completed in 1880 and issued in 1881, and the Old Testament was completed in 1884 and published in 1885. The changes in the New Testament in text (that is, in the original) in translation, and in punctuation, amounted to 36,191; and how many more might have been made may be judged from the fact that no correction was accepted which did not have a majority vote of 2 to 1. In other words, taking the New Testament members as 26, there had to be a majority of 2 to 1, or 16, say 17 to 8, to carry the point. You have heard the first three gospels, Matthew, Mark, and Luke, spoken of as ‘synoptics’. It may be of interest to remember that this word so commonly used, and meaning those who saw the thing together, or eyewitnesses, who saw the events described together, originated with the German Griesbach, a learned professor, who in 1776 published a Synopsis as he called it, of the first three gospels, to show, as he supposed, their identity of view. John was so obviously different in many points from the others that it could not be called one of the synoptics. In the early Christian ages there were writings without number. The Christian Fathers and saints seem to have had inexhaustible fecundity in emitting writings of many kinds, Acts, Gospels, memoirs, works against heretics, writings of encouragement, letters, translations, etc. But why or how these four Gospels and the other writings which compose our New Testament came to be accepted as canonical is practically unknown. There are a number of marvellous tales which it would be absurd to refer to because not even the most rigorous opponent of Christianity quotes them otherwise than with a laugh, but the first definite fact to which we can point as showing an established New Testament, is in the third Council of Carthage, held in the year 397, and we there find the New Testament comprising practically the same books that we now have. Our time is so short, that I must cut down what I want to say about the Apocryphal Gospels (from a Greek word meaning hidden, recondite, or obscure; and the word apocryphal is used in the church writings to signify something which is not accepted; so that the apocryphal gospels will be those gospels which are not accepted by the Church, not canonical). It will be proper to say that in the early days of Christianity, however, a great number of these apocryphal gospels were accepted as fully as any others; were daily read and studied for spiritual benefit. Some of them are very interesting for the subject matter they contain, as showing the state of mind and spirit of the Christians of the early ages. Some of them contain very extraordinary miracles, which are interesting from a psychological standpoint, as a psychological study; and others report traditions of Jesus and his acts, which are also valuable; one of them showing Jesus as flying into a passion with some boy and striking him and killing him. He then resuscitated the boy, on his mother’s prayer, by kicking the boy’s hinderparts — Gospel of Matthew, 26. There are 13 apocryphal Acts ; and a number of Revelations, 5 or 6, as I remember. All belong to the literature of the early Christian centuries. No one can say how much more of the literature has perished, because so great was the hatred of the different sects of Christians for each other that they never hesitated to destroy the writings of their opponents when they could come upon them. It is popularly supposed that the Mohammedans reject Jesus. This seems to be the common belief of all Christians; and that they look upon Christians as heretics (and so they do), infidels (and so they do), and that they speak of Mary the Virgin, his mother, in terms of which would bring the flush of shame to the cheek of the pious Christian. During the Middle Ages, at the time of the Crusades (or shortly before) and the wars against the gallant Saladin, the common way the Moslems were spoken of, was infidels, cursed infidels, beastly men-dogs, and various other names of similar character. The Mohammedans, however, accept Jesus as the Messiah; they accept him as the logos of God; but they deny that he was the son of God, and that he was the second person of the Trinity. In fact, they deny the Trinity, as we noticed in our first study. They teach, among many other things, that there has been a succession of 124,000 prophets, or, as it is sometimes given, 224,000; 313 of them of special importance; and out of these, six are of more particular importance; and these six are: Adam, Abraham, Moses, Jesus Christ, and Mohammed, who was the last prophet and the greatest of them all. Mohammedanism is largely based on parts of the Hebrew Bible, combined with a large amount of Persian traditions and religious thought, and with a certain substratum of the native beliefs which were current before Mohammed taught. They believe in the resurrection of the body and of the soul: that the good will be saved, and the bad will be punished; that when a man dies, two angels, Munkar and Nakir, sit, one at his head and one at his feet, and question him as to his good deeds, and if he can be proved to have been a bad man, they punish him with iron maces, but if he can prove himself to have been a good man, obedient to the established laws of the prophet, and to natural morality, he goes to a place of peace, to await the judgment trumpet of God. They believe that when men die the body decays and goes to its elements, but that the coccyx bone, the last bone of the spinal column, contains the seeds of vitality, and that at the time of the resurrection, there will fall a tremendous flood of rain upon the earth, lasting for 40 days, and that the earth will be covered with some 22 feet with water, and that then these bones will sprout like plants, and that these plants will be the bodies of all — Mohammedans, Jews, pagans, everybody, even the animals. Then men will be judged finally according to their desserts; both good and bad will have to pass across the bridge Al-Sirat, that is finer than hair and sharper than a sword; the evil will be precipitated to one of the seven hills, and the good will pass lightly and swiftly over and will then go to Paradise, which is above the seven heavens. Paradise is a wonderful place. Its soil is composed of the purest wheaten flour, or of musk, or of saffron; accounts differ. Mohammed himself seems not sure to have known. Its stones are the brightest gems, and its walls are of gold and silver. In it grows the wonderful Tuba tree, which produced everything that the faithful need; raiment, horses, food, drink. The faithful will pass their time in the company of the blackeyed women of Paradise, called the Khur-al-Uyum, the ‘houris’ or women of Paradise. These blackeyed nymphs have none of the imperfections of mortal women, nor any of the unpleasantness common to flesh. They are made of pure musk. They are immortal; they live in hollow pearls, 60 miles long and 60 miles wide. The faithful who dwell in Paradise will be as men are at 30 years of age; suffering nothing, in the fullest enjoyment of health and life; they will have the stature of Father Adam, 110 feet high, and they will live in the bliss of Paradise eternally. The Christian Heaven varies according to the way we look at it, from singing hymns to the Eternal, to contemplating the agony of the damned. It is doubtful if the rather gross imagery of the Mohammedan is worse than the imbecility or ferocity of the Christian scheme. We are speaking of the Holy Spirit (I am clearing up a number of points now, so that we can continue our regular studies in our next meeting) — we were speaking of the Holy Spirit on other occasions, and you may remember that we alluded to the fact that a number of the early Christians considered the Holy Spirit as feminine. This seems to have been very common in the early ages of Christianity. In the gospel supposedly written by Matthew [ Gospel of the Hebrews ], to which we alluded a little while ago, there occurs this verse which is found in the Christian Father Origen. He quotes it twice in his Homily 15: once on Jeremiah and once on John . I will give you the original Greek, as you may care to study it yourself. [[greek char]] (Arti elabe me meter mou to agion pneuma, en mia ton trichon mou, kai anenegkc(?) me eis to oros to mega thabor “Then took my mother, the Holy Spirit, in one of my hairs and brought me up to the mountain, the great Thabor.” It is also quoted by the Latin Father Jerome ( Michaeas, vii, 6), and he puts it naturally in Latin: “Modo tulit me mater mea Spiritus Sanctus in uno capilorum meorum” — “Then took me my mother, the Holy Spirit, in one of my hairs.” The point to notice is that the Holy Spirit is spoken of in this gospel of the Hebrews as “my mother,” and she speaks of Jesus as “my son”. Origen also speaks of the Holy Ghost, that is the Holy Spirit, in the following fashion: — [[greek char]] (Padiske de kurias tou agiou pneumatos e psuche is handmaiden to her mistress, the Holy Spirit.
  • (TG) Christian Scientist. A newly-coined term for denoting the practitioners of an art of healing by will. The name is a misnomer, since Buddhist or Jew, Hindu or Materialist, can practise this new form of Western Yoga, with like success, if he can only guide and control his will with sufficient firmness. The “Mental Scientists” are another rival school. These work by a universal denial of every disease and evil imaginable, and claim syllogistically that since Universal Spirit cannot be subject to the ailings of flesh, and since every atom is Spirit and in Spirit, and since finally, they — the healers and the healed — are all absorbed in this Spirit or Deity, there is not, nor can there be, such a thing as disease. This prevents in no wise both Christian and Mental Scientists from succumbing to disease, and nursing chronic diseases in their own bodies just like ordinary mortals.
  • (KT) Christian Scientist. A newly-coined term for denoting the practitioners of a healing art by will . The name is a misnomer, since Buddhist or Jew, Hindu or Materialist can practise this new form of Western Yoga with like success if he can only guide and control his will with sufficient firmness. “Mental Scientists” is another rival school. These work by a universal denial of every disease and evil imaginable, and claim, syllogistically, that since Universal Spirit cannot be subject to the ailings of flesh, and since every atom is Spirit and in Spirit, and since, finally, they — the healers and the healed — are all absorbed in this Spirit or Deity, there is not, nor can there be, such a thing as disease. This prevents in nowise both Christian and Mental Scientists from succumbing to disease and nursing chronic diseases for years in their own bodies just like other ordinary mortals.
  • (TG) Chthonia {Greek}. Chaotic earth in the Hellenic cosmogony.
  • (TG) Chuang. A great Chinese philosopher.
  • (TG) Chubilgan (Mongol Or Khubilkhan. The same as Chutuktu.
  • (PV) Chuen Third in the Maya primary calendric series of regents or Ahau, equated with Hun Chouen of the Popol Vuh ; god C of the Maya codices, who symbolizes the Third Regent, and has the face of a monkey. Associated with the sign Chuen and the Third Age of the Popol Vuh .
  • (TG) Chutuktu {Tibe}. An incarnation of Buddha or of some Bodhisattva, as believed in Tibet, where there are generally five manifesting and two secret Chutuktus among the high Lamas.
  • (FY) Chutuktu, the five chief Lamas of Tibet.
  • (TG) Chyuta {Sans}. Means, “the fallen” into generation, as a Kabbalist would say; the opposite of achyuta, something which is not subject to change or differentiation; said of deity.
  • (WG) Chyuta, “the fallen,” a term applied to those Dhyanis who, incarnating in human form, “fell” into generation.
  • (PV) Cib “Light, torch.” Fourth in the Maya primary calendric series of regents or Ahau, equated with Hunahpu of the Popol Vuh as Regent of the Fourth Age or Age of Quiche-Maya culture.
  • (PV) Cimi Second in the Maya primary calendric series of regents or Ahau, equated with the Came of the Popol Vuh .
  • (TG) Circle. There are several “Circles” with mystic adjectives attached to them. Thus we have: (1) the “Decussated or Perfect Circle” of Plato, who shows it decussated in the form of the letter X; (2) the “Circle-dance” of the Amazons, around a Priapic image, the same as the dance of the Gopis around the Sun (Krishna), the shepherdesses representing the signs of the Zodiac; (3) the “Circle of Necessity” of 3,000 years of the Egyptians and of the Occultists, the duration of the cycle between rebirths or reincarnations being from 1,000 to 3,000 years on the average. This will be treated under the term “Rebirth” or “Reincarnation”.
  • (OG) Circulations of the Kosmos — Also Circulations of the Universe. This is a term used in the ancient wisdom or esoteric philosophy to signify the network, marvelously intricate and builded of the channels or canals or paths or roads followed by peregrinating or migrating entities as these latter pass from sphere to sphere or from realm to realm or from plane to plane. The pilgrim monads, however far advanced or however little advanced in their evolution, inevitably and ineluctably follow these circulations. They can do nothing else, for they are simply the spiritual, psychomagnetic, astral, and physical pathways along which the forces of the universe flow; and consequently, all entities whatsoever being indeed embodiments of forces must of necessity follow the same routes or pathways that the abstract forces themselves use.
  • These circulations of the kosmos are a veritable network between planet and planet, and planet and sun, and between sun and sun, and between sun and universe, and between universe and universe. Furthermore, the circulations of the kosmos are not restricted to the material or astral spheres, but are of the very fabric and structure of the entire universal kosmos, inner as well as outer. It is one of the most mystical and suggestive doctrines of theosophy.
  • (TG) Clairaudience. The faculty, whether innate or acquired by occult training, of hearing all that is said at whatever distance.
  • (KT) Clairaudience. The faculty — whether innate or acquired by occult training — to hear things at whatever distance.
  • (OG) Clairaudience — In its largest sense the word means simply “clear-hearing.” True clairaudience is a spiritual faculty, the faculty of the inner spiritual ear, of which the psychical clairaudience is but a distorted and therefore deceptive reflection; neither is it hearing with the physical ear, so imperfect and undeveloped a sensory organ as the latter is. The power to hear with the inner ear enables you to hear anything you will, and at whatever distance, whether on Mars, or on the Sun, or on the Moon, or on Jupiter, or perhaps even on some distant star, or easily anywhere on Earth. Having this spiritual clairaudience, you can hear the grass grow, and that hearing will be to you like a symphonic musical poem. You can hear the celestial orbs singing their songs as they advance along their orbits through space, because everything that is, is in movement, producing sound, simple or composite as the case may be. Thus in very truth every tiny atom sings its own note, and every composite entity, therefore, is an imbodied musical poem, a musical symphony. ( See also Music of the Spheres)
  • (TG) Clairvoyance. The faculty of seeing with the inner eye or spiritual sight. As now used it is a loose and flippant term, embracing under its meaning a happy guess due to natural shrewdness or intuition, and also that faculty which was so remarkably exercised by Jacob Boehme and Swedenborg. Real clairvoyance means the faculty of seeing through the densest matter (the latter disappearing at the will and before the spiritual eye of the Seer), and irrespective of time (past, present and future) or distance.
  • (KT) Clairvoyance. A faculty of seeing with the inner eye or spiritual sight. As now used, it is a loose and flippant term, embracing under its meaning both a happy guess due to natural shrewdness or intuition, and also that faculty which was so remarkably exercised by Jacob Boehme and Swedenborg. Yet even these two great seers, since they could never rise superior to the general spirit of the Jewish Bible and Sectarian teachings, have sadly confused what they saw, and fallen far short of true clairvoyance.
  • (OG) Clairvoyance — In its largest sense the word simply means “clear-seeing,” insight behind the veils, inner visioning. Genuine clairvoyance is a spiritual faculty and is the ability to see and to see aright; and in seeing to know that your seeing is truth. This is no psychical faculty. The clairvoyance commonly called the psychical clairvoyance is very deceptive, because it is a mere moonlight reflection so to speak, and this moonlight reflection is uncertain, deceiving, and illusory. Genuine spiritual clairvoyance, of which the psychical clairvoyance so called is but a feeble ray, will enable one to see what passes at immense distances. You can sit in your armchair and see, with eyes closed, all that you care to see, however far away. This can be done not only in this exterior world, but one can penetrate into the interior and invisible worlds with this spiritual vision, and thus know what is going on in the worlds spiritual and ethereal. This vision is not physical vision, nor that which, on the astral plane, manifests itself as psychical clairvoyance; but true vision is spiritual clairvoyance — seeing through the inner spiritual eye.
  • (TG) Clemens Alexandrinus. A Church Father and a voluminous writer, who had been a Neo-Platonist and a disciple of Ammonius Saccas. He lived between the second and the third centuries of our era, at Alexandria.
  • (KT) Clemens Alexandrinus. A Church Father and voluminous writer, who had been a Neo-Platonist and a disciple of Ammonius Saccas. He was one of the few Christian philosophers between the second and third centuries of our era, at Alexandria.
  • (TG) Cock. A very occult bird, much appreciated in ancient augury and symbolism. According to the Zohar, the cock crows three times before the death of a person; and in Russia and all Slavonian countries whenever a person is ill on the premises where a cock is kept, its crowing is held to be a sign of inevitable death, unless the bird crows at the hour of midnight, or immediately afterwards, when its crowing is considered natural. As the cock was sacred to Aesculapius, and as the latter was called the Soter (Saviour) who raised the dead to life, the Socratic exclamation “We owe a cock to Aesculapius”, just before the Sage’s death, is very suggestive. As the cock was always connected in symbology with the Sun (or solar gods), Death and Resurrection, it has found its appropriate place in the four Gospels in the prophecy about Peter repudiating his Master before the cock crowed thrice. The cock is the most magnetic and sensitive of all birds, hence its Greek name alectruon.
  • (TG) Codex Nazaraeus {Latin}. The “Book of Adam” — the latter name meaning anthropos, Man or Humanity. The Nazarene faith is called sometimes the Bardesanian system, though Bardesanes (B.C. 155 to 228) does not seem to have had any connection with it. True, he was born at Edessa in Syria, and was a famous astrologer and Sabian before his alleged conversion. But he was a well-educated man of noble family, and would not have used the almost incomprehensible Chaldeo-Syriac dialect mixed with the mystery language of the Gnostics, in which the Codex is written. The sect of the Nazarenes was pre-Christian. Pliny and Josephus speak of the Nazarites as settled on the banks of the Jordan 150 years B.C. (Ant. Jud. xiii. p. 9); and Munk says that the “Naziareate was an institution established before the laws of Musah” or Moses Their modern name is in Arabic — El Mogtasila; in European languages — the Mendaeans or “Christians of St. John”. (See “Baptism”. But if the term Baptists may well be applied to them, it is not with the Christian meaning: for while they were, and still are Sabians, or pure astrolaters, the Mendaeans of Syria, called the Galileans, are pure polytheists, as every traveller in Syria and on the Euphrates can ascertain, once he acquaints himself with their mysterious rites and ceremonies. (See Isis Unv. ii. So secretly did they preserve their beliefs from the very beginning, that Epiphanius who wrote against the Heresies in the 14th century confesses himself unable to say what they believed in (I. 122); he simply states that they never mention the name of Jesus, nor do they call themselves Christians (loc. cit. 190). Yet it is undeniable that some of the alleged philosophical views and doctrines of Bardesanes are found in the codex of the Nazarenes. (See Norberg’s Codex Nazaraeus, or the “Book of Adam”, and also “Mendaeans
  • (WG) Codex Nazaraeus, the Codex of the Nazarenes; the Book of
  • (TG) Coeur, Facques. A famous Treasurer of France, born in 1408, who obtained the office by black magic. He was reputed as a great alchemist and his wealth became fabulous; but he was soon banished from the country, and retiring to the Island of Cyprus, died there in 1460, leaving behind enormous wealth, endless legends and a bad reputation.
  • (TG) Coffin-Rite, or Pastos. This was the final rite of Initiation in the Mysteries in Egypt, Greece and elsewhere. The last and supreme secrets of Occultism could not be revealed to the Disciple until he had passed through this allegorical ceremony of Death and Resurrection into new light. “The Greek verb teleutao ,” says Vronsky, “signifies in the active voice ‘I die’, and in the middle voice ‘I am initiated'”. Stobaeus quotes an ancient author, who says, “The mind is affected in death, just as it is in the initiation into the Mysteries and word answers to word, as well as thing to thing; for telutan is ‘to die’, and teleisthai ‘to be initiated ‘”. And thus, as Mackenzie corroborates, when the Aspirant was placed in the Pastos, Bed, or Coffin (in India on the lathe, as explained in the Secret Doctrine), “he was symbolically said to die”.
  • (TG) Collanges, Gabriel de. Born in 1524. The best astrologer in the 16th century and a still better Kabbalist. He spent a fortune in the unravelling of its mysteries. It was rumoured that he died through poison administered to him by a Jewish Rabbin-Kabbalist.
  • (TG) College of Rabbis. A college at Babylon; most famous during the early centuries of Christianity. Its glory, however, was greatly darkened by the appearance in Alexandria of Hellenic teachers, such as Philo Judaeus, Josephus, Aristobulus and others. The former avenged themselves on their successful rivals by speaking of the Alexandrians as theurgists and unclean prophets. But the Alexandrian believers in thaumaturgy were not regarded as sinners or impostors when orthodox Jews were at the head of such schools of ” hazim “. These were colleges for teaching prophecy and occult sciences. Samuel was the chief of such a college at Ramah; Elisha at Jericho. Hillel had a regular academy for prophets and seers; and it is Hillel, a pupil of the Babylonian College, who was the founder of the Sect of the Pharisees and the great orthodox Rabbis.
  • (KT) College of Rabbis. A college at Babylon; most famous during the early centuries of Christianity, but its glory was greatly darkened by the appearance in Alexandria of Hellenic teachers, such as Philo-Judaeus, Josephus, Aristobulus and others. The former avenged themselves on their successful rivals by speaking of the Alexandrians as Theurgists and unclean prophets. But the Alexandrian believers in thaumaturgy were not regarded as sinners and impostors when orthodox Jews were at the head of such schools of “hazim.” There were colleges for teaching prophecy and occult sciences. Samuel was the chief of such a college at Ramah; Elisha, at Jericho. Hillel had a regular academy for prophets and seers; and it is Hillel, a pupil of the Babylonian College, who was the founder of the sect of the Pharisees and the great orthodox Rabbis.
  • (TG) Collemann, Jean. An Alsatian, born at Orleans, according to K. Mackenzie; other accounts say he was a Jew, who found favour owing to his astrological studies, with both Charles VII. and Louis XI., and that he had a bad influence on the latter.
  • (TG) Collyridians. A sect of Gnostics who, in the early centuries of Christianity, transferred their worship and reverence from Astoreth to Mary, as Queen of Heaven and Virgin. Regarding the two as identical, they offered to the latter as they had done to the former, buns and cakes on certain days, with sexual symbols represented on them.
  • (VS) Compassion Absolute (III 31) [[p. 70]] (31). This “compassion” must not be regarded in the same light as “God, the divine love” of the Theists. Compassion stands here as an abstract, impersonal law whose nature, being absolute Harmony, is thrown into confusion by discord, suffering and sin.
  • (OG) Consciousness — In all its forms and protean manifestations, consciousness is spirit-matter — force and matter, or spirit and substance, are one — hence consciousness is the finest and loftiest form of energy, is the root of all things, and is coextensive with kosmic space. It is, therefore, the foundation and the essence of gods, of monads, and of atoms — the three generalized degrees, kosmically speaking, of the universe. A natural corollary from this is that the universe therefore is imbodied consciousness, or much more correctly we should call it a quasi-infinite aggregate of imbodied consciousnesses.
  • (TG) Continents. In the Buddhist cosmogony, according to Gautama Buddha’s exoteric doctrine, there are numberless systems of worlds (or Sakwala) all of which are born, mature, decay, and are destroyed periodically. Orientalists translate the teaching about “the four great continents which do not communicate with each other”, as meaning that “upon the earth there are four great continents” (see Hardy’s Eastern Monachism, p. 4), while the doctrine means simply that around or above the earth there are on either side four worlds, i.e ., the earth appearing as the fourth on each side of the arc.
  • (PV) Copal The sap from various Central American trees which is used by Mayan natives for incense for purificative and other purposes. Equated with blood and rain as a divine substance or exudation in nature.
  • (TG) Corybantes, Mysteries of the. These were held in Phrygia in honour of Atys, the youth beloved by Cybele. The rites were very elaborate within the temple and very noisy and tragic in public. They began by a public bewailing of the death of Atys and ended in tremendous rejoicing at his resurrection. The statue or image of the victim of Jupiter’s jealousy was placed during the ceremony in a pastos (coffin), and the priests sang his suffering. Atys, as Visvakarma in India, was a representative of Initiation and Adeptship. He is shown as being born impotent, because chastity is a requisite of the life of an aspirant. Atys is said to have established the rites and worship of Cybele, in Lydia. (See WW Correspondence We saw that the term [hierarchies] was generally applied to those institutions in human affairs whereby authority is deputed or delegated from higher to lower, and that each step, on the hierarchical theory, required another one above it and another one below it. While we saw that this applied to human affairs, nevertheless we also saw that it was a correspondence, to use Swedenborg’s term, of what exists in the cosmos. And if we could get a proper, clear, concise, intelligible view of what hierarchy means in man, or rather, in the affairs of mankind, we have thereby a key by which we may understand the operations that take place in nature — these operations, being the working of intelligence and will upon matter. This takes place according to what H. P. Blavatsky called the doctrine of analogy . Now analogy itself is a science. There are such things as false analogies in logic, and there are manifestations in nature which one can perceive, see, study, and yet they are not, properly speaking, analogies with some set standard. They are apparent analogies, false analogies. To use our own terms, they are Mayavic, that is, illusionary (from the Sanskrit, Maya, illusion “As it is above, so it is below” is the great Hermetic axiom, which you will find all through our literature. The Kabalists had a similar doctrine, i.e. that in the manifestation of the unnameable Deity — this manifestation being accomplished through hierarchies of angelical beings, each angel or each entity, or each god as a Greek would say, Deva as a Hindu or Buddhist would say — each of these entities is impressed as the wax takes the impress of the seal, with the characteristic of its hierarchical head. Therefore, every series of entities proceeding from a hierarchical head bears the stamp or characteristic of that fountain, that source.
  • (TG) Cosmic Gods. Inferior gods, those connected with the formation of matter.
  • (TG) Cosmic ideation Eternal thoughts impressed on substance or spirit-matter, in the eternity; thought which becomes active at the beginning of every new life-cycle.
  • (TG) Cosmocratores {Greek}. “Builders of the Universe”, the “world architects”, or the Creative Forces personified.
  • (OG) Cosmos — Whenever a theosophist speaks of the cosmos or the universe, he by no means refers only to the physical sphere or world or cross section of the boundless All in which we humans live, but more particularly to the invisible worlds and planes and spheres inhabited by their countless hosts of vitalized or animate beings. In order to avoid redundancy of words and often confusing repetitions in the midst of an explanation dealing with other matters, since H. P. Blavatsky’s time it has been customary among careful theosophical writers to draw a distinction of fact between cosmos and kosmos. The solar universe or solar system is frequently referred to as cosmos or solar cosmos; and the galactic universe or our own home-universe it has been customary to refer to as the kosmos. This distinction, however, does not always hold, because sometimes in dealing with abstract questions where the application of the thought can be indifferently made either to the galactic or to the solar universe, the two forms of spelling may be used interchangeably. ( See also Kosmos, Kosmic Life)
  • (TG) Cow-worship. The idea of any such “worship” is as erroneous as it is unjust. No Egyptian worshipped the cow, nor does any Hindu worship this animal now, though it is true that the cow and bull were sacred then as they are to-day, but only as the natural physical symbol of a metaphysical ideal; even as a church made of bricks and mortar is sacred to the civilized Christian because of its associations and not by reason of its walls. The cow was sacred to Isis, the Universal Mother, Nature, and to the Hathor, the female principle in Nature, the two goddesses being allied to both sun and moon, as the disk and the cow’s horns (crescent) prove. (See “Hathor In the Vedas, the Dawn of Creation is represented by a cow, This dawn is Hathor, and the day which follows, or Nature already formed, is Isis, for both are one except in the matter of time. Hathor the elder is “the mistress of the seven mystical cows” and Isis, “the Divine Mother”, is the “cow-horned”, the cow of Plenty (or Nature, Earth), and, as the mother of Horns (the physical world) — the “mother of all that lives”. The outa was the symbolic eye of Horns, the right being the sun, and the left the moon. The right “eye” of Horus was called “the cow of Hathor”, and served as a powerful amulet, as the dove in a nest of rays or glory, with or without the cross, is a talisman with Christians, Latins and Greeks. The Bull and the Lion which we often find in company with Luke and Mark in the frontispiece of their respective Gospels in the Greek and Latin texts, are explained as symbols — which is indeed the fact. Why not admit the same in the case of the Egyptian sacred Bulls, Cows, Rams, and Birds?
  • (TG) Cremer, John. An eminent scholar who for over thirty years studied Hermetic philosophy in pursuance of its practical secrets, while he was at the same time Abbot of Westminster. While on a voyage to Italy, he met the famous Raymond Lully whom he induced to return with him to England. Lully divulged to Cremer the secrets of the stone, for which service the monastery offered daily prayers for him. Crenier, says the Royal Masonic Cyclopedia, “having obtained a profound knowledge of the secrets of Alchemy, became a most celebrated and learned adept in occult philosophy lived to a good old age, and died in the reign of King Edward III.”
  • (TG) Crescent. Sin was the Assyrian name for the moon, and Sin-ai the Mount, the birth-place of Osiris, of Dionysos, Bacchus and several other gods. According to Rawlinson, the moon was held in higher esteem than the sun at Babylon, because darkness preceded light. The crescent was, therefore, a sacred symbol with almost every nation, before it became the standard of the Turks. Says the author of Egyptian Belief, “The crescent . . . . . . is not essentially a Mahometan ensign. On the contrary, it was a Christian one, derived through Asia from the Babylonian Astarte, Queen of Heaven, or from the Egyptian Isis . . . . whose emblem was the crescent. The Greek Christian Empire of Constantinople held it as their palladium Upon the conquest of the Turks, the Mahometan Sultan adopted it for the symbol of his power. Since that time the crescent has been made to oppose the idea of the cross.”
  • (TG) Criocephale {Greek}. Ram-headed, applied to several deities and emblematic figures, notably those of ancient Egypt, which were designed about the period when the Sun passed, at the Vernal Equinox, from the sign Taurus to the sign Aries. Previously to this period, bull-headed and horned deities prevailed. Apis was the type of the Bull deity, Ammon that of the ram-headed type: Isis, too, had a Cow’s head allotted to her. Porphyry writes that the Greeks united the Ram to Jupiter and the Bull to Bacchus. [w.w.w.]
  • (TG) Crocodile. “The great reptile of Typhon.” The seat of its worship “was Crocodilopolis and it was sacred to Set and Sebak — its alleged creators. The primitive Rishis in India, the Manus, and Sons of Brahma, are each the progenitors of some animal species, of which he is the alleged “father”; in Egypt, each god was credited with the formation or creation of certain animals which were sacred to him. Crocodiles must have been numerous in Egypt during the early dynasties, if one has to judge by the almost incalculable number of their mummies. Thousands upon thousands have been excavated from the grottoes of Moabdeh, and many a vast necropolis of that Typhonic animal is still left untouched. But the Crocodile was only worshipped where his god and “father” received honours. Typhon had once received such honours and, as Bunsen shows, had been considered a great god. His words are, “Down to the time of Ramses B.C. 1300, Typhon was one of the most venerated and powerful gods, a god who pours blessings and life on the rulers of Egypt.” As explained elsewhere, Typhon is the material aspect of Osiris. When Typhon, the Quaternary, kills Osiris, the triad or divine Light, and cuts it metaphorically into 14 pieces, and separates himself from the “god”, he incurs the execration of the masses; he becomes the evil god, the storm and hurricane god, the burning sand of the Desert, the constant enemy of the Nile, and the “slayer of the evening beneficent dew”, because Osiris s the ideal Universe, Siva the great Regenerative Force, and Typhon the material portion of it, the evil side of the god, or the Destroying Siva. This is why the crocodile is also partly venerated and partly execrated. The appearance of the crocodile in the Desert, far from the water, prognosticated the happy event of the coming inundation — hence its adoration at Thebes and Ombos. But he destroyed thousands of human and animal beings yearly — hence also the hatred and persecution of the Crocodile at Elephantine and Tentyra.
  • (WG) Crore, 10,000,000.
  • (IN) Crore Ten million.
  • (TG) Cross. Mariette Bey has shown its antiquity in Egypt by proving that in all the primitive sepulchres “the plan of the chamber has the form of a cross ‘ . It is the symbol of the Brotherhood of races and men; and was laid on the breast of the corpses in Egypt, as it is now placed on the corpses of deceased Christians, and, in its Swastica form (croix cramponnee), on the hearts of the Buddhist adepts and Buddhas. (See “Calvary Cross
  • (TG) Crux Ansata {Latin}. The handled cross, [[symbol shaped like a T sans serif with equal length lines]]; whereas the tau is T [[same as last]], in this form, and the oldest Egyptian cross or the tat is thus +. The crux ansata was the symbol of immortality, but the tat -cross was that of spirit-matter and had the significance of a sexual emblem. The crux ansata was the foremost symbol in the Egyptian Masonry instituted by Count Cagliostro; and Masons just have indeed forgotten the primitive significance of their highest symbols, if some of their authorities still insist that the crux ansata is only a combination of the cteis (or yoni) and phallus (or lingham). Far from this. The handle or ansa had a double significance, but never a phallic one; as an attribute of Isis it was the mundane circle; as a symbol of law on the breast of a mummy it was that of immortality, of an endless and beginningless eternity, that which descends upon and grows out of the plane of material nature, the horizontal feminine line, surmounting the vertical male line — the fructifying male principle in nature or spirit. Without the handle the crux ansata became the tau T [[same as last description]], which, left by itself, is an androgyne symbol, and becomes purely phallic or sexual only when it takes the shape +.
  • (WG) Crux Ansata (Latin), the ansated cross
  • (TG) Crypt {Greek}. A secret subterranean vault, some for the purpose of initiation, others for burial purposes. There were crypts under every temple in antiquity. There was one on the Mount of Olives, lined with red stucco, and built before the advent of the Jews.
  • (PV) Culebra Spanish, “snake,” a pejorative term for the Seven Came, their hellish nahuals, and the brujos or black magicians who represent them on earth
  • (TG) Curetes. The Priest-Initiates of ancient Crete, in the service of Cybele. Initiation in their temples was very severe; it lasted twenty-seven days, during which time the aspirant was left by himself in a crypt, undergoing terrible trials. Pythagoras was initiated into these rites and came out victorious.
  • (TG) Cutha. An ancient city in Babylonia after which a tablet giving an account of “creation” is named. The “Cutha tablet” speaks of a “temple of Sittam”, in the sanctuary of Nergal, the “giant king of war, lord of the city of Cutha”, and is purely esoteric. It has to be read symbolically, if at all.
  • (TG) Cycle. From the Greek kuklos. The ancients divided time into endless cycles, wheels within wheels, all such periods being of various durations, and each marking the beginning or the end of some event either cosmic, mundane, physical or metaphysical. There were cycles of only a few years, and cycles of immense duration, the great Orphic cycle, referring to the ethnological change of races, lasting 120,000 years, and the cycle of Cassandrus of 136,000, which brought about a complete change in planetary influences and their correlations between men and gods — a fact entirely lost sight of by modern astrologers.
  • (KT) Cycle KUKLOS {Greek} The ancients divided time into endless cycles, wheels within wheels, all such periods being of various durations, and each marking the beginning or end of some event either cosmic, mundane, physical or metaphysical. There were cycles of only a few years, and cycles of immense duration, the great Orphic cycle referring to the ethnological change of races lasting 120,000 years, and that of Cassandrus of 136,000, which brought about a complete change in planetary influences and their correlations between men and gods — a fact entirely lost sight of by modern astrologers.
  • (WG) Cycle, a ring or turn, from the Greek Kuklos ; more properly a spiral; a day and night are a cycle; a year is another. The returning again of any time or any impression. The subject of cycles is of the greatest importance, as it includes all history and all evolution. The best known large cycle is the sidereal, a little over 25,000 years.
  • (OG) Cycles or Law of Cycles — An exceedingly interesting branch of theosophical study, and one dealing with a fact which is so obviously manifest in the worlds surrounding us that its existence can hardly be denied, except by the willfully blind, is what may be called the law of cycles, or nature’s repetitive operations.
  • We find nature repeating herself everywhere, although such repetition of course is not merely a running in the same old ruts on each recurrence of the cyclic activity; for each recurrence is of course the expression of a modification, more or less great, of what has preceded. Day succeeds night, winter succeeds summer, the planets circulate around the suns in regular and periodical courses; and these are but familiar examples of cyclical activity.
  • Cycles in nature show the time periods of periodic recurrence along and in which any evolving entity or thing expresses the energies and powers which are itself, so that cycles and evolution are like the two sides of a coin: the one shows the time periods or cycles, and the other side manifests the energic or substantial qualities appearing in manifestation according to these cyclical time-periods; but back of this apparently double but actually single process always lie profound karmic causes.
  • (TG) Cynocephalus {Greek}. The Egyptian Hapi. There was a notable difference between the ape-headed gods and the “Cynocephalus” (Simia hamadryas), a dog-headed baboon from upper Egypt. The latter, whose sacred city was Hermopolis, was sacred to the lunar deities and Thoth-Hermes, hence an emblem of secret wisdom-as was Hanuman, the monkey-god of India, and later, the elephant-headed Ganesha. The mission of the Cynocephalus was to show the way for the Dead to the Seat of Judgment and Osiris, whereas the ape-gods were all phallic. They are almost invariably found in a crouching posture, holding on one hand the outa (the eye of Horus), and in the other the sexual cross. Isis is seen sometimes riding on an ape, to designate the fall of divine nature into generation.
  • (TG) D. — Both in the English and Hebrew alphabets the fourth letter, whose numerical value is four. The symbolical signification in the Kabbala of the Daleth is “door”. It is the Greek delta , through which the world (whose symbol is the tetrad or number four,) issued, producing the divine seven. The name of the Tetrad was Harmony with the Pythagoreans, “because it is a diatessaron in sesquitertia”. With the Kabbalists, the divine name associated with Daleth was Daghoul.
  • (TG) Daath {Hebr}. Knowledge; “the conjunction of Chokinah and Binah, Wisdom and Understanding: sometimes, in error, called a Sephira. [w.w.w.]
  • (TG) Dabar {Hebr}. D (a) B (a) R (im), meaning the “Word”, and the “Words” in the Chaldean Kabbala, Dabar and Logoi. (See Sec. Logos” or “Word”
  • (TG) Dabistan {Pers}. The land of Iran; ancient Persia.
  • (TG) Dache-Dachus {Chald}. The dual emanation of Moymis, the progeny of the dual or androgynous World-Principle, the male Apason and female Tauthe. Like all theocratic nations possessing Temple mysteries, the Babylonians never mentioned the “One” Principle of the Universe, nor did they give it a name. This made Damascius (Theogonies) remark that like the rest of “barbarians” the Babylonians passed it over in silence. Tauthe was the mother of the gods, while Apason was her self-generating male power, Moymis, the ideal universe, being her only-begotten son, and emanating in his turn Dache-Dachus, and at last Belus, the Demiurge of the objective Universe.
  • (TG) Dactyli {Greek}. From daktulos, “a finger”. The name given to the Phrygian Hierophants of Kybele, who were regarded as the greatest magicians and exorcists. They were five or ten in number because of the five fingers on one hand that blessed, and the ten on both hands which evoke the gods. They also heated by manipulation or mesmerism.
  • (IU) Dactyls. ( daktulos, a finger). — A name given to the priests attached to the worship of Kybele (Cybele). Some archaeologists derive the name from GREEK, finger, because they were ten, the same in number as the fingers of the hand. But we do not believe the latter hypothesis is the correct one.
  • (TG) Dadouchos {Greek}. The torch-bearer, one of the four celebrants in the Eleusinian mysteries. There were several attached to the temples but they appeared in public only at the Panathenaic Games at Athens, to preside over the so-called “torch-race”. (See
  • (TG) Daemon {Greek}. In the original Hermetic works and ancient classics it has a meaning identical with that of “god”, “angel” or “genius”. The Daemon of Socrates is the incorruptible part of the man, or rather the real inner man which we call Nous or the rational divine Ego. At all events the Daemon (or Daimon) of the great Sage was surely not the demon of the Christian Hell or of Christian orthodox theology. The name was given by ancient peoples, and especially the philosophers of the Alexandrian school, to all kinds of spirits, whether good or bad, human or otherwise. The- appellation is often synonymous with that of gods or angels. But some philosophers tried, with good reason, to make a just distinction between the many classes.
  • (IU) Daemons. — A name given by the ancient people, and especially the philosophers of the Alexandrian school, to all kinds of spirits, whether good or bad, human or otherwise. The appellation is often synonymous with that of gods or angels. But some philosophers tried, with good reason, to make a just distinction between the many classes.
  • (FY) Daemon, the incorruptible part of man; nous; rational soul.
  • (TG) Daenam (Pahlavi). Lit., “Knowledge”, the principle of understanding in man, rational Soul, or Manas, according to the Avesta.
  • (FY) Daenam ( lit. “knowledge”), the fourth principle in man, according to the Avesta.
  • (TG) Dag, Dagon {Hebr}. “Fish” and also “Messiah”. Dagon was the Chaldean man-fish Oannes, the mysterious being who arose daily out of the depths of the sea to teach people every useful science. He was also called Annedotus.
  • (TG) Dagoba {Sans}, or Stupa. Lit: a sacred mound or tower for Buddhist holy relics. These are pyramidal-looking mounds scattered all over India and Buddhist countries, such as Ceylon, Burmah, Central Asia, etc. They are of various size, and generally contain some small relics of Saints or those claimed to have belonged to Gautama, the Buddha. As the human body is supposed to consist of 84,000 dhatus (organic cells with definite vital functions in them), Asoka is said for this reason to have built 84,000 dhatu-gopas or Dagobas in honour of every cell of the Buddha’s body, each of which has now become a dharmadhaitu or holy relic. There is in Ceylon a Dhatu-gopa at Anuradhapura, said to date from 160 years B.C. They are now built pyramid-like, but the primitive Dagobas were all shaped like towers with a cupola and several tchhatya (umbrellas) over them. Eitel states that the Chinese Dagobas have all from 7 to 14 tchhatras over them, a number which is symbolical of the human body.
  • (WG) Dagoba, a conical erection of brick or stone surrounding relics among the Buddhists, built on a platform.
  • (FY) Daimonlouphote, spiritual illumination.
  • (TG) Daityas {Sans}. Giants, Titans, and exoterically demons, but in truth identical with certain Asuras, the intellectual gods, the opponents of the useless gods of ritualism and the enemies of puja, sacrifices.
  • (FY) Daityas, demons, Titans.
  • (WG) Daityas, descendants of Diti, demons, giants who lived in the earliest ages.
  • (GH) Daityas literally Descendants of Diti — by the Rishi Kasyapa. The daityas are the titans (popularly called demons), constantly warring with the gods; at times they are the victors, at others the vanquished. “The first war happened in the night of time, between the gods [and] the (A)- suras, and lasted for the period of one ‘divine year.’ On this occasion the deities were defeated by the Daityas, under the leadership of Hrada. After that, owing to a device of Vishnu, to whom the conquered gods applied for help, the latter defeated the Asuras. In the Vishnu Purana no interval is found between the two wars. In the Esoteric Doctrine, one war takes place before the building of the Solar system; another, on earth, at the ‘creation’ of man; ” ( Secret Doctrine, I, p. 419). The meaning of the wars is, therefore, that the Daityas represent the urgers of evolutionary progress in the cosmic scheme. ( Bhagavad-Gita, W. Q. Judge, p. 75)
  • (TG) Daitya Guru {Sans}. The instructor of the giants, called Daityas Allegorically, it is the title given to the planet Venus-Lucifer, or rather to its Ruler, Sukra, a male deity (See Sec. Doct. ii. p. 30).
  • (WG) Daitya-yuga, an age of the demons, consisting of 12,000 divine years.
  • (TG) Daivi-prakriti {Sans}. Primordial, homogeneous light, called by some Indian Occultist, “the Light of the Logos” (see Notes on the Bhagavat Gita,) when differentiated this light becomes FOHAT.
  • (WG) Daiva-prakriti, the synthesis of the six forces in the astral light; the “Light of the Logos.”
  • (OG) Daiviprakriti — {Sans} A compound signifying “divine” or “original evolver,” or “original source,” of the universe or of any self-contained or hierarchical portion of such universe, such as a solar system. Briefly, therefore, daiviprakriti may be called “divine matter,” matter here being used in its original sense of “divine mother-evolver ” or “divine original substance .”
  • Now, as original substance manifests itself in the kosmic spaces as primordial kosmic light — light in occult esoteric theosophical philosophy being a form of original matter or substance — many mystics have referred to daiviprakriti under the phrase “the Light of the Logos.” Daiviprakriti is, in fact, the first veil or sheath or ethereal body surrounding the Logos, as pradhana or prakriti surrounds Purusha or Brahman in the Sankhya philosophy, and as, on a scale incomparably more vast, mulaprakriti surrounds parabrahman. As daiviprakriti, therefore, is elemental matter, or matter in its sixth and seventh stages counting from physical matter upwards or, what comes to the same thing, matter in its first and second stages of its evolution from above, we may accurately enough speak of those filmy ethereal wisps of light seen in the midnight skies as a physical manifestation of daiviprakriti, because when they are not actually resolvable nebulae, they are worlds, or rather systems of worlds, in the making.
  • When daiviprakriti has reached a certain state or condition of evolutionary manifestation, we may properly speak of it under the term fohat. Fohat, in H. P. Blavatsky’s words, is “The essence of cosmic electricity. An occult Tibetan term for Daivi-prakriti, primordial light: and in the universe of manifestation the ever-present electrical energy and ceaseless destructive and formative power. Esoterically, it is the same, Fohat being the universal propelling Vital Force, at once the propeller and the resultant.” — Theosophical Glossary, p. 121
  • All this is extremely well put, but it must be remembered that although fohat is the energizing power working in and upon manifested daiviprakriti, or primordial substance, as the rider rides the steed, it is the kosmic intelligence, or kosmic monad as Pythagoras would say, working through both daiviprakriti and its differentiated energy called fohat, which is the guiding and controlling principle, not only in the kosmos but in every one of the subordinate elements and beings of the hosts of multitudes of them infilling the kosmos. The heart or essence of the sun is daiviprakriti working as itself, and also in its manifestation called fohat, but through the daiviprakriti and the fohatic aspect of it runs the all-permeant and directive intelligence of the solar divinity. The student should never make the mistake, however, of divorcing this guiding solar intelligence from its veils or vehicles, one of the highest of which is daiviprakriti-fohat.
  • (SKv) Daiviprakriti ‘Divine-Nature,’ prima materia, the highest states of matter, the first luminous emanations of the Universal Mind which form the nuclei of Universes, solar systems, and planets; a compound of daivi, from the verb-root div — to shine; and prakriti — original substance or nature, elemental matter. When a world comes into being, its first appearances are fiery and luminous. Thus we read in G. de Purucker’s Occult Glossary : . . . we may accurately enough speak of those filmy ethereal wisps of light seen in the midnight skies as a physical manifestation of Daiviprakriti, because when they are not actually resolvable nebulae, they are worlds, or rather systems of worlds, in the making.
  • H. P. Blavatsky speaking of Daiviprakriti says in The Secret Doctrine : It is the informing, ever-present moving-power and life-principle, the vital soul of the suns, moons, planets, and even of our Earth. — I, 602
  • (TG) Dakini {Sans}. Female demons, vampires and blood-drinkers (asra-pas). In the Puranas they attend upon the goddess Kali and feed on human flesh. A species of evil “Elementals” .
  • (IN) Dakini {Sans} Female demons attendant on Kali; mindless elemental beings in female form; equivalent to Khado.
  • (TG) Daksha {Sans}. A form of Brahma, and his son in the Puranas. But the Rig Veda states that “Daksha sprang from Aditi, and Aditi from Daksha”, which proves him to be a personified correlating Creative Force acting on all the planes. The Orientalists seem very much perplexed what to make of him; but Roth is nearer the truth than any, when saying that Daksha is the spiritual power, and at the same time the male energy that generates the gods in eternity, which is represented by Aditi. The Puranas, as a matter of course, anthropomorphize the idea, and show Daksha instituting “sexual intercourse on this earth”, after trying every other means of procreation. The generative Force, spiritual at the commencement, becomes of course at the most material end of its evolution a procreative Force on the physical plane; and so far the Puranic allegory is correct, as the Secret Science teaches that our present mode of procreation began towards the end of the third Root-Race.
  • (WG) Daksha, ability, faculty, strength, power — all with especial application to spiritual power and will; son of Marisha, Kandu’s daughter, an allegorical personage introduced in the Puranas.
  • (TG) Dalada {Sans}. A very precious relic of Gautama the Buddha; viz., his supposed left canine tooth preserved at the great temple at Kandy, Ceylon. Unfortunately, the relic shown is not genuine. The latter has been securely secreted for several hundred years, ever since the shameful and bigoted attempt by the Portuguese (the then ruling power in Ceylon) to steal and make away with the real relic. That which is shown in the place of the real thing is the monstrous tooth of some animal.
  • (WG) Dalada, the left canine tooth of Buddha — a relic.
  • (TG) Dama {Sans}. Restraint of the senses.
  • (FY) Dama, restraint of the senses.
  • (WG) Dama, Victor, a son of Bhima; house, home; self-restraint.
  • (TG) Damayas {Sans}. Almost the same as Daityas; giants and demons, the opponents of the ritualistic gods.
  • (TG) Dambulla {Sans}. The name of a huge rock in Ceylon. It is about 400 feet above the level of the sea. Its upper portion is excavated, and several large cave-temples, or Viharas, are cut out of the solid rock, all of these being of pre-Christian date. They are considered as the best preserved antiquities in the, island. The North side of the rock is vertical and quite inaccessible, but on the South side, about 150 feet from its summit, its huge overhanging granite mass has been fashioned into a platform with a row of large cave-temples excavated in the surrounding walls — evidently at an enormous sacrifice of labour and money. Two Viharas may be mentioned out of the many: the Maha Raja Vihara, 172 ft. in length and 75 in breadth, in which there are upwards of fifty figures of Buddha, most of them larger than life and all formed from the solid rock. A well has been dug out at the foot of the central Dagoba, and from a fissure in the rock there constantly drips into it beautiful clear water which is kept for sacred purposes. In the other, the Maha Dewiyo Vihaya, there is to be seen a gigantic figure of the dead Gautama Buddha, 47 feet long, reclining on a couch and pillow cut out of solid rock like the rest. “This long, narrow and dark temple, the position and placid aspect of Buddha, together with the stillness of the place, tend to impress the beholder with the idea that he is in the chamber of death. The priest asserts . . . . that such was Buddha, and such were those (at his feet stands an attendant) who witnessed the last moments of his mortality” (Hardy’s East. Monachism). The view from Dambulla is magnificent. On the large rock platform which seems to be now more visited by very intelligent tame white monkeys than by monks, there stands a huge Bo-Tree, one of the numerous scions from the original Bo-Tree under which the Lord Siddhartha reached Nirvana. “About 50 ft. from the summit there is a pond which, as the priests assert, is never without water.” (The Ceylon Almanac
  • (TG) Dammapadan #4nn. A Buddhist work containing moral precepts.
  • (TG) Dana {Sans}. Almsgiving to mendicants, lit., “charity”, the first of the six Paramitas in Buddhism.
  • (WG) Dana, true charity.
  • (WG) Danavas, sons of Danu, demons and foes of the gods; spoken of in the Bhagavad-Gita as evil spirits or fallen angels.
  • (WG) Danda, chastisement, correction; conquest; a measure of time, 60 making a siderial day.
  • (TG) Dangma {Sans}. In Esotericism a purified Soul. A Seer and an Initiate; one who has attained full wisdom.
  • (IN) Dangma {Tibe} Freed or purified soul, a high adept, mahatma.
  • (WG) Danu, one of the daughters of Daksba and mother of the Danavas.
  • (TG) Daos {Chald}. The seventh King (Shepherd) of the divine Dynasty, who reigned over the Babylonians for the space of ten sari, or 36,000 years, a saros being of 3,600 years’ duration. In his time four Annedoti, or Men-fishes (Dagons) made their appearance.
  • (TG) Darasta {Sans}. Ceremonial magic practised by the central Indian tribes, especially among the Kolarians.
  • (TG) Dardanus {Greek}. The Son of Jupiter and Electra, who received the Kabeiri gods as a dowry, and took them to Samothrace, where they were worshipped long before the hero laid the foundations of Troy, and before Tyre and Sidon were ever heard of, though Tyre was built 2,760 years B.C. (See for fuller details “Kabiri
  • (TG) Darha {Sans}. The ancestral spirits of the Kolarians.
  • (TG) Darsanas {Sans}. The Schools of Indian philosophy, of which there are six; Shad-darsanas or six demonstrations.
  • (WG) Darsanas, the six systems of Hindu philosophy, viz : Sankhya of Kapila, Yoga of Patanjali, Nyaya of Gotama, Vaiseshika of Kanada, Purva-Mimansa of Jamini, Uttara-Mimansa or Vedanta of Vyasa.
  • (FY) Darusta, ceremonial magic practised among the Kolarian tribes of Central India.
  • (FY) Darha, ancestral spirits of the Kolarian tribes of Central India.
  • (TG) Dasa-sil {Pali} . The ten obligations or commandments taken by and binding upon the priests of Buddha; the five obligations or Pansil are taken by laymen.
  • (GH) Dasra One of the twin sky deities, the Asvins , father of Sahadeva — the fifth Pandava — by Madri incorrectly spelled Darsa (Meaning of the word itself: accomplishing wonderful deeds
  • (TG) Dava {Tibe}. The moon, in Tibetan astrology.
  • (TG) Davkina {Chald}. The wife of Hea, “the goddess of the lower regions, the consort of the Deep”, the mother of Merodach, the Bel of later times, and mother to many river-gods, Hea being the god of the lower regions, the “lord of the Sea or abyss”, and also the lord of Wisdom.
  • (VS) Master of the Day (III 24) [[p. 65]] “Day” means here a whole Manvantara, a period of incalculable duration.
  • (TG) Dayanisi #1nn The god worshipped by the Jews along with other Semites, as the “Ruler of men”; Dionysos — the Sun; whence Jehovah-Nissi, or Iao-Nisi, the same as Dio-nysos or Jove of Nyssa.
  • (TG) Day of Brahma . See “Brahma’s Day” etc.
  • (WG) Day of Brahma, the great period during which universal manifestation lasts. A space of time said to include 2,160,000,000 years, or 14 Manvantaras. See Yuga .
  • (TG) Dayus or Dyaus {Sans}. A Vedic term. The unrevealed Deity, or that which reveals Itself only as light, and the bright day — metaphorically.
  • (VS) living and the Dead (II 32) [[p. 40]] The “living” is the immortal Higher Ego, and the “dead” the lower personal Ego.
  • Pythagoras:
  • Death is our common lot. Material riches are won and lost. Let thy life be inspired by the purest justice! Be beyond reproach in relation to others and to thyself. Seize every opportunity to learn. In this way thou wilt lead a most pleasurable life.
  • Ponder these thoughts. When thou art filled by them thou wilt be enabled to conceive of the nature of God, of men, and of things, and to account for the unity of all creation. Thou wilt then know this universal law, that everywhere in the world matter and spirit are in principle identical.
  • Continue the work of liberating thy soul by making a judicious and well-considered choice in all things, to the end that thou mayest assure the triumph of what is best in thyself – the triumph of the spirit. Then, when thou leavest thy mortal shape, thou wilt rise into the ether and, ceasing to be mortal, wilt thyself assume the form of an immortal god.
  • (OG) Death — Death occurs when a general break-up of the constitution of man takes place; nor is this break-up a matter of sudden occurrence, with the exceptions of course of such cases as mortal accidents or suicides. Death is always preceded, varying in each individual case, by a certain time spent in the withdrawal of the monadic individuality from an incarnation, and this withdrawal of course takes place coincidently with a decay of the seven-principle being which man is in physical incarnation. This decay precedes physical dissolution, and is a preparation of and by the consciousness-center for the forthcoming existence in the invisible realms. This withdrawal actually is a preparation for the life to come in invisible realms, and as the septenary entity on this earth so decays, it may truly be said to be approaching rebirth in the next sphere.
  • Death occurs, physically speaking, with the cessation of activity of the pulsating heart. There is the last beat, and this is followed by immediate, instantaneous unconsciousness, for nature is very merciful in these things. But death is not yet complete, for the brain is the last organ of the physical body really to die, and for some time after the heart has ceased beating, the brain and its memory still remain active and, although unconsciously so, the human ego for this short length of time, passes in review every event of the preceding life. This great or small panoramic picture of the past is purely automatic, so to say; yet the soul-consciousness of the reincarnating ego watches this wonderful review incident by incident, a review which includes the entire course of thought and action of the life just closed. The entity is, for the time being, entirely unconscious of everything else except this. Temporarily it lives in the past, and memory dislodges from the akasic record, so to speak, event after event, to the smallest detail: passes them all in review, and in regular order from the beginning to the end, and thus sees all its past life as an all-inclusive panorama of picture succeeding picture.
  • There are very definite ethical and psychological reasons inhering in this process, for this process forms a reconstruction of both the good and the evil done in the past life, and imprints this strongly as a record on the fabric of the spiritual memory of the passing being. Then the mortal and material portions sink into oblivion, while the reincarnating ego carries the best and noblest parts of these memories into the devachan or heaven-world of postmortem rest and recuperation. Thus comes the end called death; and unconsciousness, complete and undisturbed, succeeds, until there occurs what the ancients called the second death.
  • The lower triad (prana, linga-sarira, sthula-sarira) is now definitely cast off, and the remaining quaternary is free. The physical body of the lower triad follows the course of natural decay, and its various hosts of life-atoms proceed whither their natural attractions draw them. The linga-sarira or model-body remains in the astral realms, and finally fades out. The life-atoms of the prana, or electrical field, fly instantly back at the moment of physical dissolution to the natural pranic reservoirs of the planet.
  • This leaves man, therefore, no longer a heptad or septenary entity, but a quaternary consisting of the upper duad (atma-buddhi) and the intermediate duad (manas-kama). The second death then takes place.
  • Death and the adjective dead are mere words by which the human mind seeks to express thoughts which it gathers from a more or less consistent observation of the phenomena of the material world. Death is dissolution of a component entity or thing. The dead, therefore, are merely dissolving bodies — entities which have reached their term on this our physical plane. Dissolution is common to all things, because all physical things are composite: they are not absolute things. They are born; they grow; they reach maturity; they enjoy, as the expression runs, a certain term of life in the full bloom of their powers; then they “die.” That is the ordinary way of expressing what men call death; and the corresponding adjective is dead, when we say that such things or entities are dead.
  • Do you find death per se anywhere? No. You find nothing but action; you find nothing but movement; you find nothing but change. Nothing stands still or is annihilated. What is called death itself shouts forth to us the fact of movement and change. Absolute inertia is unknown in nature or in the human mind; it does not exist.
  • (TG) Death, Kiss of. According to the Kabbalah, the earnest follower does not die by the power of the Evil Spirit, Yetzer ha Rah, but by a kiss from the mouth of Jehovah Tetragrammaton, meeting him in the Haikal Ahabah or Palace of Love. [w.w.w.]
  • (WG) Deha, the body.
  • (TG) Deist. One who admits the existence of a god or gods, but claims to know nothing of either and denies revelation. A Freethinker of olden times.
  • (KT) Deist. One who admits the possibility of the existence of a God or gods, but claims to know nothing of either, and denies revelation. An agnostic of olden times.
  • (TG) Dei termini {Latin}. The name for pillars with human heads representing Hermes, placed at cross-roads by the ancient Greeks and Romans. Also the general name for deities presiding over boundaries and frontiers.
  • (VS) webs of Delusion (I 7) [[p. 4]] Sakkayaditthi “delusion” of personality.
  • (TG) Demerit. In Occult and Buddhistic parlance, a constituent of Karma. It is through avidya or ignorance of vidya, divine illumination, that merit and demerit are produced. Once an Arhat obtains full illumination and perfect control over his personality and lower nature, he ceases to create “merit and demerit”.
  • (TG) Demeter. The Hellenic name for the Latin Ceres, the goddess of corn and tillage. The astronomical sign, Virgo. The Eleusinian Mysteries were celebrated in her honour.
  • (IN) De minimus non curat lex {Latin} The law does not concern itself with trifles.
  • (TG) Demiurgic Mind. The same as “Universal Mind”. Mahat, the first “product” of Brahma, or himself.
  • (TG) Demiurgos {Greek} The Demiurge or Artificer; the Supernal Power which built the universe. Freemasons derive from this word their phrase of “Supreme Architect”. With the Occultists it is the third manifested Logos, or Plato’s ” second god”, the second logos being represented by him as the “Father”, the only Deity that he dared mention as an Initiate into the Mysteries.
  • (IU) Demiourgos; or Demiurge. — Artificer; the Supernal Power which built the universe. Freemasons derive from this word their phrase of “Supreme Architect.” The chief magistrates of certain Greek cities bore the title.
  • (WG) Demiurgos (Greek), the creator, not in any personal sense, but as the aggregate of creative forces in the universe.
  • (IN) Demiourgos (Gk) Cosmic artificer, supreme architect; collectively, the creative powers which build the universe.
  • (TG) Demon est Deus inversus {Latin}. A Kabbalistic axiom; lit., “the devil is god reversed”; which means that there is neither evil nor good, but that the forces which create the one create the other, according to the nature of the materials they find to work upon.
  • (TG) Demonologia {Greek}. Treatises or Discourses upon Demons, or Gods in their dark aspects.
  • (TG) Demons. According to the Kabbalah, the demons dwell in the world of Assiah, the world of matter and of the “shells” of the dead. They are the Klippoth. There are Seven Hells, whose demon dwellers represent the vices personified. Their prince is Samael, his female companion is Isheth Zenunim — the woman of prostitution: united in aspect, they are named “The Beast”, Chiva. [w.w.w.]
  • (TG) Demrusch {Pers}. A Giant in the mythology of ancient Iran.
  • (TG) Denis, Angoras. “A physician of Paris, astrologer and alchemist
  • (TG) Deona Mati . In the Kolarian dialect, one who exorcises evil spirits.
  • (FY) Deona or Mati, one who exorcises evil spirits ( Kolarian ).
  • (TG) Dervish. A Mussulman — Turkish or Persian — ascetic. A nomadic and wandering monk. Dervishes, however, sometimes live in communities. They are often called the “whirling charmers”. Apart from his austerities of life, prayer and contemplation, the Turkish, Egyptian, or Arabic devotee presents but little similarity with the Hindu fakir, who is also a mussulman. The latter may become a saint and holy mendicant; the former will never reach beyond his second class of occult manifestations. The dervish may also be a strong mesmerizer, but he will never voluntarily submit to the abominable and almost incredible self-punishment which the fakir invents for himself with an ever-increasing avidity, until nature succumbs and he dies in slow and excruciating tortures. The most dreadful operations, such as flaying the limbs alive; cutting off the toes, feet, and legs; tearing out the eyes; and causing one’s self to be buried alive up to the chin in the earth, and passing whole months in this posture, seem child’s play to them. The Dervish must not be confused ‘with the Hindu sanyasi or yogi. (See “Fakir”).
  • (IU) Dervishes, or the “whirling charmers,” as they are called. Apart from the austerities of life, prayer and contemplation, the Mohammedan devotee presents but little similarity with the Hindu fakir. The latter may become a sannyasi, or saint and holy mendicant; the former will never reach beyond his second class of occult manifestations. The dervish may also be a strong mesmerizer, but he will never voluntarily submit to the abominable and almost incredible self-punishment which the fakir invents for himself with an ever-increasing avidity, until nature succumbs and he dies in slow and excruciating tortures. The most dreadful operations, such as flaying the limbs alive; cutting off the toes, feet, and legs; tearing out the eyes; and causing one’s self to be buried alive up to the chin in the earth, and passing whole months in this posture, seem child’s play to them. One of the most common tortures is that of Tshiddy-Parvady. [Or more commonly charkh puja.] It consists in suspending the fakir to one of the mobile arms of a kind of gallows to be seen in the vicinity of many of the temples. At the end of each of these arms is fixed a pulley over which passes a rope terminated by an iron hook. This hook is inserted into the bare back of the fakir, who inundating the soil with blood is hoisted up in the air and then whirled round the gallows. From the first moment of this cruel operation until he is either unhooked or the flesh of his back tears out under the weight of the body and the fakir is hurled down on the heads of the crowd, not a muscle of his face will move. He remains calm and serious and as composed as if taking a refreshing bath. The fakir will laugh to scorn every imaginable torture, persuaded that the more his outer body is mortified, the brighter and holier becomes his inner, spiritual body. But the Dervish, neither in India, nor in other Mahometan lands, will ever submit to such operations.
  • (TG) Desatir. A very ancient Persian work called the Book of Shet. It speaks of the thirteen Zoroasters, and is very mystical.
  • (WG) Desatir, an ancient Persian book containing the books of the various prophets. It is full of mysticism and not clear to the modern mind.
  • Desiderata by Max Ehrmann
  • (TG) Deva {Sans}. A god, a “resplendent” deity. Deva-Deus, from the root div “to shine”. A Deva is a celestial being — whether good, bad, or indifferent. Devas inhabit “the three worlds”, which are the three planes above us. There are 33 groups or 330 millions of them.
  • (KT) Deva {Sans} A god, a “resplendent” Deity, Deva-Deus, from the root div, “to shine.” A Deva is a celestial being — whether good, bad or indifferent — which inhabits “the three worlds,” or the three planes above us. There are 33 groups or millions of them.
  • (FY) Deva, God; beings of the subjective side of Nature.
  • (WG) Deva (also Devata), a celestial being, a god.
  • (OG) Deva(s) — {Sans} A word meaning celestial being, of which there are various classes. This has been a great puzzle for most of our Occidental Orientalists. They cannot understand the distinctions that the wonderful old philosophers of the Orient make as regards the various classes of the devas. They say, in substance: “What funny contradictions there are in these teachings, which in many respects are profound and seem wonderful. Some of these devas or divine beings are said to be less than man; some of these writings even say that a good man is nobler than any god. And yet other parts of these teachings declare that there are gods higher even than the devas, and yet are called devas. What does this mean?”
  • The devas or celestial beings, one class of them, are the unself-conscious sparks of divinity, cycling down into matter in order to bring out from within themselves and to unfold or evolve self -consciousness, the svabhava of divinity within. They then begin their reascent always on the luminous arc, which never ends, in a sense; and they are gods, self -conscious gods, henceforth taking a definite and divine part in the “great work,” as the mystics have said, of being builders, evolvers, leaders of hierarchies. In other words, they are monads which have become their own innermost selves, which have passed the ring-pass-not separating the spiritual from the divine.
  • (GH) Deva A divinity, a spiritual being. In the plural the reference is to the heavenly or shining ones called in the Rig-Veda (II, p. 3, 4) visve devas ‘all the gods,’ — often reckoned as 33 (figuring 11 for each of the ‘three worlds’), or again as the 8 Vasus, the 11 Rudras, the 12 Adityas, and the 2 Asvins. This is also the enumeration in the Mahabharata. The three worlds are the “three planes above us.” ( Theosophical Glossary, H. P. Blavatsky, p. 98) The word is generally rendered ‘god,’ although incorrectly, as pointed out by Subba Row: “Do not make the mistake of thinking that the word Deva means a god, and that because we have thirty-three crores of Devas, we therefore worship thirty-three crores of gods. This is an unfortunate blunder generally committed by Europeans. Deva is a kind of spiritual being, and because the same word is used in ordinary parlance to mean god, it by no means follows that we have and worship thirty-three crores of gods. These beings, as may be naturally inferred, have a certain affinity with one of the three component upadhis [basic principles] into which we have divided man” ( Notes on the Bhagavad-Gita, pp. 37-8) — i.e. , the upadhi of the Karana-sarira. (from div, the sky, the heaven. Bhagavad-Gita, W. Q. Judge, p. 74)
  • (SK)o Deva A Divinity or a ‘Shining One’; derived from the verbal root div — to shine. Deva is a very general and inclusive term for all grades of spiritual beings ranging from the young god-sparks on the ladder of evolution, whose evolution is still latent, up to the highest of the Gods who are divine manifestations and self-conscious Divinities.
  • (SP) Deva — celestial being, a deity. Note: Devachan (the state of rest between incarnations) has been mistakenly explained as a compound of Sanskrit deva with a supposed Tibetan word chan meaning land or region. Devachan is actually a borrowing of the Tibetan word bde-ba-can (pronounced de-wa-chen ), which is the Tibetan translation of Sanskrit sukhavati, “the happy place.”
  • (TG) Deva Sarga {Sans}. Creation: the origin of the principles, said to be Intelligence born of the qualities or the attributes of nature.
  • (TG) Devachan {Sans}. The “dwelling of the gods”. A state intermediate between two earth-lives, into which the Ego (Atma-Buddhi-Manas, or the Trinity made One) enters, after its separation from Kama Rupa, and the disintegration of the lower principles on earth.
  • (KT) Devachan {Sans} The “Dwelling of the Gods.” A state intermediate between two earth-lives, and into which the Ego (Atma-Buddhi-Manas, or the Trinity made one) enters after its separation from Kama Rupa, and the disintegration of the lower principles, after the death of the body, on Earth.
  • (FY) Devachan, a blissful condition in the after-life; heavenly existence.
  • (WG) Devachan, heaven, the subjective rest between incarnations.
  • (OG) Devachan — [Tibetan, bde-ba-can, pronounced de-wa-chen ] A translation of the Sanskrit sukhavati, the “happy place” or god-land. It is the state between earth-lives into which the human entity, the human monad, enters and there rests in bliss and repose.
  • When the second death after that of the physical body takes place — and there are many deaths, that is to say many changes of the vehicles of the ego — the higher part of the human entity withdraws into itself all that aspires towards it, and takes that “all” with it into the devachan; and the atman, with the buddhi and with the higher part of the manas, become thereupon the spiritual monad of man. Devachan as a state applies not to the highest or heavenly or divine monad, but only to the middle principles of man, to the personal ego or the personal soul in man, overshadowed by atma-buddhi. There are many degrees in devachan: the highest, the intermediate, and the lowest. Yet devachan is not a locality, it is a state, a state of the beings in that spiritual condition.
  • Devachan is the fulfilling of all the unfulfilled spiritual hopes of the past incarnation, and an efflorescence of all the spiritual and intellectual yearnings of the past incarnation which in that past incarnation have not had an opportunity for fulfillment. It is a period of unspeakable bliss and peace for the human soul, until it has finished its rest time and stage of recuperation of its own energies.
  • (IN) the devachanic state, the reincarnating ego remains in the bosom of the monad (or of the monadic essence) in a state of the most perfect and utter bliss and peace, reviewing and constantly reviewing, and improving upon in its own blissful imagination, all the unfulfilled spiritual and intellectual possibilities of the life just closed that its naturally creative faculties automatically suggest to the devachanic entity.
  • Man here is no longer a quaternary of substance-principles (for the second death has taken place), but is now reduced to the monad with the reincarnating ego sleeping in its bosom, and is therefore a spiritual triad. ( See also Death, Reincarnating Ego) WW Devachan This word is Tibetan, and properly transliterated would be Bdebachan, probably from the Sanskrit Deva, a divine being. This last is connected in meaning with the Greek word daimon ; the ending is a locative; hence, the ‘deva-world’…. It really means god-country, god-world, the Sanskrit equivalent being Sukhavati, a noun meaning “state or place of happiness”; vati is simply a grammatical particle implying quality, or as used here is a possessive adjective; hence, the state or place of actual, real joy, bliss. (The Tibetan alphabet has certainly been derived from the Devanagari system, in which Sanskrit is mostly written).
  • (GH) Devachan A Sanskrit-Tibetan compound word (deva, a divine being, deity; chan, region): the heaven-world. The state of the ego after death between earth-lives, when it rests in utter bliss and perfect repose. In this state all the spiritual aspirations and intellectual yearnings of the past life find fulfilment. Devachan is “an absolute oblivion of all that gave it pain or sorrow in the past incarnation, and even oblivion of the fact that such things as pain or sorrow exist at all. The Devachanee lives its intermediate cycle between two incarnations surrounded by everything it had aspired to in vain, and in the companionship of everyone it loved on earth. It has reached the fulfilment of all its soul-yearnings. And thus it lives throughout long centuries an existence of unalloyed happiness” (The Key to Theosophy, p. 148). ( Bhagavad-Gita, W. Q. Judge, p. 51)
  • (SK)o Devachan A state of mental bliss and rest enjoyed by the Reincarnating Ego after the separation of the higher and lower principles in the astral realms. In the Devachan a man’s spiritual thoughts, yearnings, and aspirations reach their fruition in a happy dream state. But those who have laid up no ‘treasures in heaven’ do not enter the Devachan, but are reborn on earth after their, passage through Kama-loka, or the astral realms of desire. The length of the Devachanic dreams depends on the grade of spiritual aspiration during earth-life. As a rule, the higher the spiritual yearnings are the longer and richer is the Devachan. However, high Initiates who are masters of life and death do not need this state of rest accompanied by illusory dreams, but return very quickly to carry on their spiritual labors for the Hierarchy of Compassion.
  • (WG) Devadatta, the conch-shell of Arjuna; one of the vital airs. ( deva, god; delta, given
  • (GH) Devadatta The name of the conch-shell of Arjuna. This conch was given to Arjuna by his parent Indra, the deity of the sky, upon the successful conclusion of the expedition which he was requested to make against the daityas of the sea, who had been troubling the deities. They were vanquished by Arjuna. (Meaning of the word itself: god-given. Bhagavad-Gita, W. Q. Judge, p. 3)
  • (WG) Devagana, a troop of Gods or celestial beings possessing much wisdom, for they are presided over by Indra, chief of the Gods.
  • (WG) Devaganeshwara, an epithet of Indra, because he is lord of a collection or troop of Gods.
  • (TG) Devajnanas {Sans}. or Daivajna. The higher classes of celestial beings, those who possess divine knowledge.
  • (TG) Devaki {Sans}. The mother of Krishna. She was shut up in a dungeon by her brother, King Kansa, for fear of the fulfilment of a prophecy which stated that a son of his sister should dethrone and kill him. Notwithstanding the strict watch kept, Devaki was overshadowed by Vishnu, the holy Spirit, and thus gave birth to that god’s avatara, Krishna
  • (WG) Devaki, the mother of Krishna.
  • (GH) Devala A Vedic Rishi descendant of Kasyapa: he is credited with having written some of the hymns of the Vedas, particularly Rig-Veda ix. ( Bhagavad-Gita, W. Q. Judge, p. 72)
  • (TG) Deva-laya {Sans}. “The shrine of a Deva”. The name given to all Brahmanical temples.
  • (TG) Deva-lokas {Sans}. The abodes of the Gods or Devas in superior spheres. The seven celestial worlds above Meru.
  • (TG) Devamatri {Sans}. Lit., “the mother of the gods”. A title of Aditi, Mystic Space.
  • (IN) Devamatri {Sans} :Mother of the gods”, cosmic or mystic space.
  • (TG) Devanagari {Sans}. Lit., “the language or letters of the devas” or gods. The characters of the Sanskrit language. The alphabet and the art of writing were kept secret for ages, as the Dwijas (Twice-born) and the Dikshitas (Initiates) alone were permitted to use this art. It was a crime for a Sudra to recite a verse of the Vedas, and for any of the two lower castes (Vaisya and Sudra) to know the letters was an offence punishable by death. Therefore is the word lipi, “writing”, absent from the oldest MSS., a fact which gave the Orientalists the erroneous and rather incongruous idea that writing was not only unknown before the day of Panini, but even to that sage himself! That the greatest grammarian the world likes ever produced should be ignorant of writing would indeed be the greatest and most incomprehensible phenomenon of all.
  • (FY) Devanagari, the current Sanskrit alphabet.
  • (WG) Devanagari, the character in which Sanscrit is usually written. (Literally, “the divine-city writing.”)
  • (SKs) Deva-parvata ‘The divine mountain,’ a name for the sacred and mystical mountain of Sumeru ( q.v. ); a compound of deva — divine, and parvata — mountain, derived from parvan — knotty, rugged.
  • (TG) Devapi {Sans}. A Sanskrit Sage of the race of Kuru, who, together with another Sage (Moru), is supposed to live throughout the four ages and until the coming of Maitreya Buddha, or Kalki (the last Avatar of Vishnu); who, like all the Saviors of the World in their last appearance, like Sosiosh of the Zoroastrians and the Rider of St. John’s Revelation, will appear seated on a White Horse. The two, Devapi and Moru, are supposed to live in a Himalayan retreat called Kalapa or Katapa. This is a Puranic allegory.
  • (TG) Devarshis, or Deva-rishi {Sans}. Lit., “gods rishis”; the divine or god-like saints, those sages who attain a fully divine nature on earth.
  • (WG) Devarshi, divine sage, demi-god. ( deva, god; rishi , sage
  • (TG) Devasarman {Sans}. A very ancient author who died about a century after Gautama Buddha. he wrote two famous works, in which he denied the existence of both Ego and non-Ego, the one as successfully as the other.
  • (GH) Deva-sthana literally ‘The place of a deity,’ or any place in which a deity stays or has its abode. Equivalent to Deva-loka (the word usually employed). (Compound deva, a divine being, a deity; sthana, a place, an abode. Bhagavad-Gita, W. Q. Judge, p. 67)
  • (WG) Devi (feminine of Deva), an elemental being, a goddess,
  • (WG) Dhairya, fortitude, firmness.
  • (KT) Dhammapada {Sans} A work containing various aphorisms from the Buddhist Scriptures.
  • (GH) Dhananjaya (or Dhanamjaya ) A name of Arjuna. (Compound dhana, prize, wealth, riches; jaya, winner, conqueror: hence ‘winner of the prize’ or ‘conqueror of wealth.’ Bhagavad-Gita, W. Q. Judge, p. 16)
  • (TG) Dharana {Sans}. That state in Yoga practice when the mind has, to be fixed unflinchingly on some object of meditation.
  • (VS) Dharana (I 3) [[p. 1]] Dharana, is the intense and perfect concentration of the mind upon some one interior object, accompanied by complete abstraction from everything pertaining to the external Universe, or the world of the senses.
  • (VS) Dharana (I 37) [[p. 19]] See number 3.
  • (TG) Dharani {Sans}. In Buddhism — both Southern and Northern — and also in Hinduism, it means simply a mantra or mantras — sacred verses from the Rig Veda. In days of old these mantras or Dharani were all considered mystical and practically efficacious in their use. At present, however, it is the Yogacharya school alone which proves the claim in practice. When chanted according to given instructions a Dharani produces wonderful effects. Its occult power, however, does not reside in the words but in the inflexion or accent given and the resulting sound originated thereby. (See “Mantra” and “Akasa”).
  • (WG) Dhananjaya, a title of Arjuna in the Bhagavad-Gita; an epithet of Soma; a particular vital air which nourishes the body. ( dhanam, booty, wealth; jaya, conquering: conquering wealth
  • (WG) Dharana, maintaining, supporting, upholding; steadfast concentration
  • (OG) Dharana — {Sans} A state in the practice of yoga as taught in Hindustan when the mind or percipient intelligence is held with inflexible firmness, with fortitude of soul, and with indomitable resolution upon the object of investigation to be attained through this form of yoga practice. ( See also Samadhi)
  • (SKv) Dharana The intense and steady mental concentration directed to some subject of thought with the mind and heart absolutely freed at the time from the disturbances of sense attractions. Dharana is derived from the verb-root dhri — to direct one’s attention, to maintain, to resolve.
  • (TG) Dharma {Sans}. The sacred Law; the Buddhist Canon.
  • (WG) Dharma, law; duty; religion; good works; custom, usage, correct course of conduct; natural action of anything under its laws; virtue.
  • (OG) Dharma — {Sans} A noun derived from the verbal root dhri . The meaning is right religion, right philosophy, right science, and the right union of these three; hence the Law per se. It also means equity, justice, conduct, duty, and similar things. It has also a secondary meaning of an essential or characteristic quality or peculiarity; and here its significance approaches closely to that of svabhava. The duty of a man, for instance, is his dharma, that which is set or prescribed or natural to him to do.
  • (SK)o Dharma That which is maintained or decreed, hence Law per se ; derived from the verb-root dhri — to establish, to hold. Dharma is Truth, the essence of religion, philosophy, and science. Dharma is the ethical doctrine of the Buddhist religion. Its precepts are justice, harmony, equity, and virtue.
  • (SP) Dharma — sacred law, religion, or duty.
  • (TG) Dharmachakra {Sans}. Lit., The turning of the “wheel of the Law”. The emblem of Buddhism as a system of cycles and rebirths or reincarnations.
  • (VS) These vestures are: Nirmanakaya, Sambhoga-Kaya, and Dharmakaya, robe Sublime (II 21) [[p. 32]] Ibid . [[ To I, 20 – See Buddhas of Compassion.]]
  • (TG) Dharmakaya {Sans}. Lit., “the glorified spiritual body” called the “Vesture of Bliss”. The third, or highest of the Trikaya (Three Bodies), the attribute developed by every “Buddha”, i.e ., every initiate who has crossed or reached the end of what is called the “fourth Path” (in esotericism the sixth “portal” prior to his entry on the seventh). The highest of the Trikaya, it is the fourth of the Buddhaketya, or Buddhic planes of consciousness, represented figuratively in Buddhist asceticism as a robe or vesture of luminous Spirituality. In popular Northern Buddhism these vestures or robes are: (1) Nirmanakaya, (2) Sambhogakaya, (3) and Dharmakaya, the last being the highest and most sublimated of all, as it places the ascetic on the threshold of Nirvana. (See, however, the Voice of the Silence
  • (VS) Dharmakaya (II 37) [[p. 42]] Vide infra, Part III. 34. [[ See Buddhas of Compassion.]]
  • (WG) Dharmakaya, the “glorified spiritual body” developed by every Buddha; the body of the law, not as a collection of laws but as a body or vehicle obtained by practice of the precepts through countless incarnations.
  • (OG) Dharmakaya — {Sans} This is a compound of two words meaning the “continuance body,” sometimes translated equally well (or ill) the “body of the Law” — both very inadequate expressions, for the difficulty in translating these extremely mystical terms is very great. A mere correct dictionary-translation often misses the esoteric meaning entirely, and just here is where Occidental scholars make such ludicrous errors at times.
  • The first word comes from the root dhri, meaning “to support,” “to sustain,” “to carry,” “to bear,” hence “to continue”; also human laws are the agencies supposed to carry, support, sustain, civilization; the second element, kaya, means “body.” The noun thus formed may be rendered the “body of the Law,” but this phrase does not give the idea at all. It is that spiritual body or state of a high spiritual being in which the restricted sense of soulship and egoity has vanished into a universal (hierarchical) sense, and remains only in the seed, latent — if even so much. It is pure consciousness, pure bliss, pure intelligence, freed from all personalizing thought.
  • (IN) the Buddhism of Central Asia, the dharmakaya is the third and highest of the trikaya . The trikaya consists of (1) nirmanakaya, (2) sambhogakaya, and (3) dharmakaya. We may look upon these three states, all of them lofty and sublime, as being three vestures in which the consciousness of the entity clothes itself. In the dharmakaya vesture the initiate is already on the threshold of nirvana, if not indeed already in the nirvanic state. ( See also Nirmanakaya, Sambhogakaya)
  • (WG) Dharma-megha, cloud of virtue; one of the ten Bhumis (earths, worlds) with Buddhists. ( dharma, virtue; megha, cloud
  • (WG) Dharmana, accordant with nature; according to the established order of things.
  • (WG) Dharma-sastra, book of laws.
  • (SK)o Dharma-sastra, Manava-dharma-sastra A Dharma-sastra is a law-book; but it is also a general name given in India to all sacred scriptures. Dharma means ‘law,’ ‘harmony’ and ‘truth,’ and sastra is a ‘scripture.’ The Manavadharma-sastra or Dharma-sastra of Manu, is so named because the instructions contained therein are attributed to the first Mann of the human race. This work, often called in the West the ‘Laws of Manu,’ is the well-known and highly revered and ancient lawbook of India. It is not merely an ordinary law-book, but treats also of the origin and emanation of the Universe, of many metaphysical doctrines, of the after-death states, as well as of the art and science of government and ethics.
  • (TG) Dharmaprabhasa {Sans}. The name of the Buddha who will appear during the seventh Root-race. (See “Ratnavabhasa Kalpa”, when sexes will exist no longer).
  • (TG) Dharmasmriti Upasthana {Sans}. A very long compound word containing a very mystical warning. “Remember, the constituents (of human nature) originate according to the Nidanas, and are not originally the Self”, which means — that, which the Esoteric Schools teach, and not the ecclesiastical interpretation.
  • (TG) Dharmsoka {Sans}. The name given to the first Asoka after his conversion to Buddhism, — King Chandragupta, who served all his long life “Dharma”, or the law of Buddha. King Asoka (the second) was not converted, but was born a Buddhist.
  • (FY) Dharmasoka, one of the kings of Magadha.
  • (TG) Dhatu (Pali). Relics of Buddha’s body collected after his cremation.
  • (FY) Dhatu, the seven principal substances of the human body — chyle, flesh, blood, fat, bones, marrow, semen.
  • (WG) Dhoti, the cloth wrapped around the loins of Hindus. It is from 2 1/2 to 3 1/2 yards long, and 2 or 3 feet broad. lt is found represented upon the oldest frescoes and sculptures.
  • (GH) Dhrishtadyumna The brother of Draupadi son of Drupada, the king of Panchala. He was made the commander-in-chief of the Pandava army, and accomplished the death of Drona, after losing his own father in the great conflict. (Meaning of the word itself: confident in strength. Bhagavad-Gita, W. Q. Judge, p. 4)
  • (GH) Dhrishtaketu An ally of the Pandavas: son of Sisupala, the king of the land of the Chedis living in the district of the modern Bundelkhand (or Bundelcund). The Chedis were renowned for their attachment to ancient laws and institutions. (Meaning of the word itself: confident in clearness. Bhagavad-Gita, W. Q. Judge, p. 2)
  • (WG) Dhritarashtra, a blind king, one of the personalities in the Mahabharata, who allegorically represents material existence — of which his blindness and thirst for prolonged life are typical. He is the first character prominently mentioned in the Bhagavad-Gita, where, being blind, he anxiously asks for particulars of the battle, the defeat of his side meaning that material existence will fall into insignificance. ( dhrita, firm, supported; rashtra, kingdom: “whose empire is firm.”)
  • (GH) Dhritarashtra The eldest son of Krishna Dvaipayana Vyasa and Ambika (widow of Vichitravirya) being born blind. He was the father by Gandhari of Duryodhana (the eldest of 100 sons), to whom he relinquished the government of his kingdom at Hastinapura. Therefore he sided with the Kauravas ( i.e., the sons of Kuru, as Duryodhana and his followers were called) rather than with the Pandavas, the sons of his half-brother Pandu. Vyasa offered Dhritarashtra vision, but he refused the gift inasmuch as he could not bear the sight of the fratricide and slaughter in the oncoming battle at Kurukshetra; nevertheless, taking a keen interest in the proceedings, as the opening stanzas show, he has Sanjaya narrate every event that occurs. With the final victory of the Pandavas, Dhritarashtra enthrones Yudhishthira at Hastinapura, and with his wife, Gandhari and Kunti he retires to the forest, where all lose their lives in a conflagration.
  • W. Q. Judge suggests the interpretation that Dhritarashtra stands for man’s physical body viewing the story from the standpoint of the evolutionary development of man. (Meaning of the word itself: he whose empire stands firm. Bhagavad-Gita, W. Q. Judge, p. 1)
  • (WG) Dhriti, patience, steadfastness; a certain evening sacrifice offered to the asvamedha.
  • (TG) Dhruva {Sans}. An Aryan Sage, now the Pole Star. A Kshatriya (one of the warrior caste) who became through religious austerities a Rishi, and was, for this reason, raised by Vishnu to this eminence in the skies. Also called Grah-Adhar or “the pivot of the planets”.
  • (WG) Dhruva (also Dhruvatara), the pole-star. (Literally, “remaining in one place.”)
  • (SKf) Dhruva The Pole Star; derived from the verb-root dhru — to be firm or fixed. The age of our present Dhruva is intimately connected with the cycles of the Root-Races.
  • (WG) Dhurti, decay; injury, damage.
  • (TG) Dhyana {Sans}. In Buddhism one of the six Paramitas of perfection, a state of abstraction which carries the ascetic practising it far above this plane of sensuous perception and out of the world of matter. Lit., “contemplation”. The six stages of Dhyan differ only in the degrees of abstraction of the personal Ego from sensuous life.
  • (FY) Dhyan, contemplation. There are six stages of Dhyan, varying in the degrees of abstraction of the Ego from sensuous life.
  • (KT) Dhyana {Sans} One of the six Paramitas of perfection. A state of abstraction which carries the ascetic practising it far above the region of sensuous perception, and out of the world of matter. Lit., “contemplation.” The six stages of Dhyan differ only in the degrees of abstraction of the personal Ego from sensuous life.
  • (VS) Dhyana (I 41) [[p. 20]] Dhyana is the last stage before the final on this Earth unless one becomes a full MAHATMA. As said already in this state the Raj Yogi is yet spiritually conscious of Self, and the working of his higher principles. One step more, and he will be on the plane beyond the Seventh (or fourth according to some schools). These, after the practice of Pratyehara a preliminary training, in order to control one’s mind and thoughts count Dharana, Dhyana and Samadhi and embraces the three under the generic name of SAMYAMA.
  • (WG) Dhyana, meditation; abstract contemplation; divine intuition
  • (OG) Dhyana — {Sans} A term signifying profound spiritualintellectual contemplation with utter detachment from all objects of a sensuous and lower mental character. In Buddhism it is one of the six paramitas of perfection. One who is adept or expert in the practice of dhyana, which by the way is a wonderful spiritual exercise if the proper idea of it be grasped, is carried in thought entirely out of all relations with the material and merely psychological spheres of being and of consciousness, and into lofty spiritual planes. Instead of dhyana being a subtraction from the elements of consciousness, it is rather a throwing off or casting aside of the crippling sheaths of ethereal matter which surround the consciousness, thus allowing the dhyanin, or practicer of this form of true yoga, to enter into the highest parts of his own constitution and temporarily to become at one with and, therefore, to commune with the gods. It is a temporary becoming at one with the upper triad of man considered as a septenary, in other words, with his monadic essence. Man’s consciousness in this state or condition becomes purely buddhi, or rather buddhic, with the highest parts of the manas acting as upadhi or vehicle for the retention of what the consciousness therein experiences. From this term is drawn the phrase dhyani-chohans or dhyani-buddhas — words so frequently used in theosophical literature and so frequently misconceived as to their real meaning. ( See also Samadhi)
  • (IN) Dhyani(s) {Sans} fr dhyana, “deep contemplation”) Spiritual beings.
  • (TG) Dhyani Bodhisattvas {Sans}. In Buddhism, the five sons of the Dhyani-Buddhas. They have a mystic meaning in Esoteric Philosophy.
  • (TG) Dhyani Buddhas {Sans}. They “of the Merciful Heart”; worshipped especially in Nepaul. These have again a secret meaning.
  • (WG) Dhyani-Buddha, a spiritual or mental Buddha, of whom seven, and sometimes ten, are mentioned; the first beings emanated by Avalokitesvara.
  • (IN) Dhyani-Buddha {Sans} A spiritual architect of worlds who emanates divine creative forces, the cosmic prototype of a human buddha.
  • (TG) Dhyani Pasa {Sans}. “The rope of the Dhyanis” or Spirits; the Ring “Pass not” (See Sec. Doct., Stanza V., Vol. I., p. 129).
  • (TG) Dhyan Chohans {Sans}. Lit., ” The Lords of Light”. The highest gods, answering to the Roman Catholic Archangels. The divine Intelligences charged with the supervision of Kosmos.
  • (KT) Dhyan Chohans {Sans} Lit., “The Lords of Light.” The highest gods, answering to the Roman Catholic Archangels. The divine Intelligences charged with the supervision of Kosmos.
  • (FY) Dhyan Chohans, Devas or Gods; planetary spirits.
  • (WG) Dhyan Chohans, the highest creative intelligences; gods; souls who become gods and co-workers with nature.
  • (OG) Dhyan(i)-Chohan(s) — A compound word meaning “lords of meditation” — kosmic spirits or planetary spirits. There are three classes of dhyan-chohans, each of which is divided into seven subclasses. The dhyan-chohans collectively are one division of that wondrous host of spiritual beings who are the full-blown flowers of former world periods or manvantaras. This wondrous host are the men made perfect of those former world periods; and they guide the evolution of this planet in its present manvantara. They are our own spiritual lords, leaders, and saviors. They supervise us now in our evolution here, and in our own present cyclic pilgrimage we follow the path of the general evolution outlined by them.
  • Man in his higher nature is an embryo dhyan-chohan, an embryo lord of meditation. It is his destiny, if he run the race successfully, to blossom forth at the end of the seventh round as a lord of meditation — a planetary spirit — when this planetary manvantaric kalpa is ended, this Day of Brahma, which is the seven rounds, each round in seven stages.
  • (IN) one most important sense the dhyan-chohans are actually our own selves . We were born from them. We are the monads, we are the atoms, the souls, projected, sent forth, emanated, by the dhyanis.
  • (SK)o Dhyan – Chohan A Kosmic Spirit, one of that ‘Wondrous Host of Spiritual Beings’ who are the fuller flowerings of men once made perfect. These Dhyan-Chohans are of many classes, each with its own department of Nature to supervise and to inspire. Dhyan-Chohan is a Sanskrit-Tibetan compound meaning ‘Lord of Meditation’; derived from the Sanskrit Dhyana meditation, and Chohan, the Tibetan word for ‘Lord.’
  • (SK)o Dhyani – Chohan, Dhyani – Buddha Dhyani-Chohan is a more nearly correct form for Dhyan-Chohan. However, the former term is often applied merely to the lower classes of Dhyan-Chohans or beings of the god-world. Hence the Dhyani-Chohans are called the ‘Builders’ of the material spheres, or the Lords of the Shadowy Arc of evolution; whereas the higher classes of Dhyan-Chohans are usually referred to as Dhyani-Buddhas or the ‘Architects,’ or the Inspirers of the Dhyani-Chohans, or the Lords of the Spiritual or Luminous Arc of evolution.
  • (IN) Dhyani-Chohan(s) “Lords of meditation,” creative gods, celestial beings superior to man.
  • (VS) Dhyan Marga (III 18) [[p. 60]] Dhyan-Marga is the “Path of Dhyana ,” literally; or the Path of pure knowledge, of Paramartha or (Sanscrit) Svasamvedana “the self-evident or self-analysing reflection.”
  • (TG) Diakka. Called by Occultists and Theosophists “spooks” and “shells”, i.e ., phantoms from Kama Loka. A word invented by the great American Seer, Andrew Jackson Davis, to denote what he considers untrustworthy “Spirits”. In his own words: “A Diakka (from the Summerland) is one who takes insane delight in playing parts, in juggling tricks, in personating opposite characters; to whom prayer and profane utterances are of equi-value; surcharged with a passion for lyrical narrations; . . . morally deficient, he is without the active feelings of justice, philanthropy, or tender affection. He knows nothing of what men call the sentiment of gratitude; the ends of hate and love are the same to him; his motto is often fearful and terrible to others — SELF is the whole of private living, and exalted annihilation the end of all private life. Only yesterday, one said to a lady medium, signing himself Swedenborg, this: ‘Whatsoever is, has been, will be, or may be, that I AM; and private life is but the aggregative phantasms of thinking throblets, rushing in their rising onward to the central heart of eternal death’!” (The Diakka and their Victims; ” an explanation of the False and Repulsive in Spiritualism.”) These “Diakka” are then simply the Communicating and materializing so-called “Spirits” of Mediums and Spiritualists.
  • (TG) Dianoia {Greek}. The same as the Logos. The eternal source of thought, “divine ideation”, which is the root of all thought. (See “Ennoia.”)
  • (TG) Dido, or Elissa. Astarte; the Virgin of the Sea — who crushes the Dragon under her foot. The patroness of the Phoenician mariners. A Queen of Carthage who fell in love with Aeneas according to Virgil.
  • (TG) Digambara {Sans}. A naked mendicant. Lit., “clothed with Space”. A name of Siva in his character of Rudra, the Yogi.
  • (TG) Dii Minores {Latin}. The inferior or “reflected” group of the “twelve gods” or Dii Majores, described by Cicero in his De Natura Deorum, 1. 13.
  • (TG) Dik {Sans}. Space, Vacuity.
  • (FY) Dik, space.
  • (TG) Diksha {Sans}. Initiation. Dikshit, an Initiate.
  • (FY) Diksha, initiation.
  • (WG) Diksha, ceremonies preliminary to sacrifice; new-birth — a rite of initiation; initiation personified as the wife of Soma.
  • (WG) Dikshita, initiated; an initiate.
  • (SKf) Diksha, Dikshita, Dikshaka Diksha is spiritual or religious initiation or dedication; derived from the verb-root diksh — to consecrate, or dedicate one’s self. A Dikshita is one who is initiated, a pupil of a spiritual teacher. A Dikshaka is a spiritual guide or priest, one who initiates.
  • (TG) Diktamnon {Greek}, or Dictamnus (Dittany). A curious plant possessing very occult and mystical properties and well-known from ancient times. It was sacred to the Moon-Goddesses, Luna, Astarte, Diana. The Cretan name of Diana was Diktynna, and as such the goddess wore a wreath made of this magic plant. The Diktamnon is an evergreen shrub whose contact, as claimed in Occultism, develops and at the same time cures somnambulism. Mixed with Verbena it will produce clairvoyance and ecstasy. Pharmacy attributes to the Diktamnon strongly sedative and quieting properties. It grows in abundance on Mount Dicte, in Crete, and enters into many magical performances resorted to by the Cretans even to this day.
  • (TG) Dingir and Mul-lil {akkadian} The Creative Gods.
  • (TG) Dinur {Hebr}. The River of Fire whose flame burns the Souls of the guilty in the Kabbalistic allegory.
  • (TG) Dionysos {Greek} The Demiurgos, who, like Osiris, was killed by the Titans and dismembered into fourteen parts. He was the personified Sun, or as the author of the Great Dionysiak Myth says: “He is Phanes, the spirit of material visibility, Kyklops giant of the Universe, with one bright solar eye, the growth-power of the world, the all-pervading animism of things, son of Semele. . . . .” Dionysos was born at Nysa or Nissi, the name given by the Hebrews to Mount Sinai (Exodus xvii. 15), the birthplace of Osiris, which identifies both suspiciously with “Jehovah Nissi”. (See Isis
  • (TG) Dioscuri {Greek}. The name of Castor and Pollux, the sons of Jupiter and Leda. Their festival, the Dioscuria, was celebrated with much rejoicing by the Lacedaemonians.
  • (WG) Dioscuri (Greek), the twin brothers Castor and Pollux.
  • (TG) Dipamkara {Sans}. Lit., “the Buddha of fixed light”; a predecessor of Gautama, the Buddha.
  • (TG) Diploteratology {Greek}. Production of mixed Monsters; in abbreviation teratology.
  • (TG) Dis {Greek}. In the Theogony of Damascius, the same as Protogonos, the “first born light”, called by that author “the disposer of all things”.
  • (WG) Dis, space; a cardinal point of the compass.
  • (TG) Dises {Nors}. The later name for the divine women called Walkyries, Norris,, in the Edda.
  • (TG) Disk-worship. This was very common in Egypt but not till later times, as it began with Amenoph III., a Dravidian, who brought it from Southern India and Ceylon. It was Sun-worship under another form, the Aten-Nephru, Aten-Ra being identical with the Adonai of the Jews, the “Lord of Heaven” or the Sun. The winged disk was the emblem of the Soul. The Sun was at one time the symbol of Universal Deity shining on the whole world and all creatures; the Sabaeans regarded the Sun as the Demiurge and a Universal Deity, as did also the Hindus, and as do the Zoroastrians to this day. The Sun is undeniably the one creator of physical nature. Lenormant was obliged, notwithstanding his orthodox Christianity, to denounce the resemblance between disk and Jewish worship. “Aten represents the Adonai or Lord the Assyrian Tammuz, and the Syrian Adonis. . . .
  • (OG) Divine Soul — In occultism the divine soul is the garment of the divine ego, as the divine ego is the garment or child of the divine monad. The divine monad we may call the inner god, and this would mean that the divine ego, its offspring, is the inner Buddha, or the inner Christ; and hence the divine soul is the expression of the inner Buddha or of the inner Christ in manifestation on earth as the manushya-buddha or christ-man.
  • It should be stated here that of the several monads which in their combination form the entire septenary constitution of man each such monad has its own ego-child, and this latter has its own soul. It is this combination, mystic, wonderful, mysterious, which makes of man the complex entity he is, and which entitles him to the term which the occultism of the archaic ages has always given to him: the microcosm, a reflection or copy in the small of the macrocosm or kosmic entity.
  • (TG) Divyachakchus {Sans}. Lit., “celestial Eye” or divine seeing, perception. It is the first of the six “Abhijnas” ; the faculty developed by Yoga practice to perceive any object in the Universe, at whatever distance.
  • (TG) Divyasrotra {Sans}. Lit., “celestial Ear” or divine hearing. The second “Abhijna”, or the faculty of understanding the language or sound produced by any living being on Earth.
  • (TG) Djati {Sans}. One of the twelve “Nidanas” ; the cause and the effect in the mode of birth taking place according to the “Chatur Yoni”, when in each case a being, whether man or animal, is placed in one of the six (esoteric seven) Gati or paths of sentient existence, which esoterically, counting downward, are: (1) the highest Dhyani (Anupadaka); (2) Devas; (3) Men; (4) Elementals or Nature Spirits; (5) Animals; (6) lower Elementals; (7) organic Germs. These are in the popular or exoteric nomenclature, Devas, Men, Asuras, Beings in Hells, Pretas (hungry demons), and Animals.
  • (TG) Djin {arabic}. Elementals; Nature Sprites; Genii. The Djins or Jins are much dreaded in Egypt, Persia and elsewhere.
  • (TG) Djnana {Sans}, or Jnana . Lit., Knowledge; esoterically, “supernal or divine knowledge acquired by Yoga”. Written also Gnyana.
  • (GH) Doab {hindi} A region of land situated between two rivers. The particular reference is to the country between the Jumna and Sarasvati rivers, which in ancient times was the land of the Kurus. (Also written duab, from Persian, du, two; ab, water; from the Sanskrit, dva, two; ap, water
  • (TG) Docetae {Greek}. Lit., “The Illusionists”. The name given by orthodox Christians to those Gnostics who held that Christ did not, nor could be, suffer death actually, but that, if such a thing had happened, it was merely an illusion which they explained in various ways.
  • (TG) Dodecahedron {Greek}. According to Plato, the Universe is built by “the first begotten” on the geometrical figure of the Dodecahedron
  • (TG) Dodona {Greek}. An ancient city in Thessaly, famous for its Temple of Jupiter and its oracles. According to ancient legends, the town was founded by a dove. WW Dogma Dogma is a Greek word from the root dokein ( dokein ), to have an opinion, to think about a thing. Dogma, then, would be a thing of supposition, a belief, a persuasion, nothing more. But during the course of time, when the Christians had grown more positive in their attitude towards the expiring faith, the Christian dogmas, the Christian opinions, became crystallized, and settled into rigid doctrines . We then see that a doctrine is an instruction, an exposition of belief, and nothing more, and that a dogma was originally an opinion, and has become a hard and fast doctrine.
  • (TG) Donar {Nors}, or Thunar, Thoy. In the North the God of Thunder. He was the Jupiter Tonans of Scandinavia. Like as the oak was devoted to Jupiter so was it sacred to Thor, and his altars were overshadowed with oak trees. Thor, or Donar, was the offspring of Odin, “the omnipotent God of Heaven”, and of Mother Earth.
  • (TG) Dondam-pai-den-pa {Tibe}. The same as the Sanskrit term Paramarthasatya or “absolute truth”, the highest spiritual self-consciousness and perception, divine self-consciousness, a very mystical term.
  • (TG) Doppelganger #ger A synonym of the “Double” and of the “Astral body” in occult parlance.
  • (WG) Doppelganger, the double which goes; the same as astral body when that wanders from the physical; synonymous with wraith or apparition or forerunner.
  • (VS) Close not thine eyes, nor lose thy sight of Dorje (III 12) [[p. 53]] Dorje is the Sanskrit Vajra, a weapon or instrument in the hands of some gods (the Tibetan Dragshed, the Devas who protect men), and is regarded as having the same occult power of repelling evil influences by purifying the air as Ozone in chemistry. It is also a Mudra a gesture and posture used in sitting for meditation. It is, in short, a symbol of power over invisible evil influences, whether as a posture or a talisman. The Bhons or Dugpas, however, having appropriated the symbol, misuse it for purposes of Black Magic. With the “Yellow Caps,” or Gelugpas, it is a symbol of power, as the Cross is with the Christians, while it is in no way more “superstitious.” With the Dugpas, it is like the double triangle reversed, the sign of sorcery.
  • (TG) Dorjesempa {Tibe}. The “Diamond Soul”, a name of the celestial Buddha.
  • (TG) Dorjeshang {Tibe}. A title of Buddha in his highest aspect; a name of the supreme Buddha; also Dorje.
  • (FY) Dosha, fault.
  • (WG) Dosha, faults.
  • (TG) Double . The same as the “Astral body” or “Doppelganger”.
  • (KT) Double. The same as the Astral body or “Doppelganger.”
  • (WG) Double, the same as Doppelganger, or the astral body detached from the physical.
  • (TG) Double Image . The name among the Jewish Kabbalists for the Dual Ego, called respectively: the Higher, Metatron, and the Lower, Samael. They are figured allegorically as the two inseparable companions of man through life, the one his Guardian Angel, the other his Evil Demon.
  • (TG) Dracontia {Greek}. Temples dedicated to the Dragon, the emblem of the Sun, the symbol of Deity, of Life and Wisdom. The Egyptian Karnac, the Carnac in Britanny, and Stonehenge are Dracontia well known to all.
  • (TG) Drakon {Greek}, or Dragon. Now considered a “mythical” monster, perpetuated in the West only on seals,, as a heraldic griffin, and the Devil slain by St. George, In fact an extinct antediluvian monster. In Babylonian antiquities it is referred to as the “scaly one” and connected on many gems with Tiamat the sea. “The Dragon of the Sea” is repeatedly mentioned. In Egypt, it is the star of the Dragon (then the North Pole Star), the origin of the connection of almost all the gods with the Dragon. Bel and the Dragon, Apollo and Python, Osiris and Typhon, Sigur and Fafnir, and finally St. George and the Dragon, are the same. They were all solar gods, and wherever we find the Sun there also is the Dragon, the symbol of Wisdom — Thoth-Hermes. The Hierophants of Egypt and of Babylon styled themselves “Sons of the Serpent-God” and “Sons of the Dragon”. “I am a Serpent, I am a Druid”, said the Druid of the Celto-Britannic regions, for the Serpent and the Dragon were both types of Wisdom, Immortality and Rebirth. As the serpent casts its old skin only to reappear in a new one, so does the immortal Ego cast off one personality but to assume another.
  • (WG) Draupadi, the wife of the five Pandu princes, being a personification of yoga-maya, or the power of illusion.
  • (GH) Draupadi The patronymic of Krishna, the daughter of Drupada, king of Panchala. At a svayamvara (a gathering for a display of feats of skill for the purpose of allowing a king’s daughter to choose a bridegroom) Draupadi selected Arjuna as her bridegroom, but when he returned with his four brothers to his mother, Kunti and announced that they had made a great acquisition, she told them that they were obliged to share it. Because of this and also through the insistence of their ancestor, the sage Vyasa, it was decided that she should become the wife of the five brothers. The Mahabharata also relates that in a previous life Draupadi had received the boon that she should be wedded to five husbands. The Draupadeyas ( i.e. , sons of Draupadi) referred to in the text, were the five sons of the Pandavas, by name: Prativindhya (by Yudhishthira), Sutasoma (by Bhima); Srutakirti (by Arjuna), Satanika (by Nakula); Srutasena (by Sahadeva).
  • Symbolically Draupadi represents ‘the terrestrial life of the personality.’ ( Bhagavad-Gita, W. Q. Judge, p. 2)
  • (TG) Draupnir {Nors}. The golden armlet of Wodan or Odin, the companion of the spear Gungnir which he holds in his right hand; both are endowed with wonderful magic properties.
  • (MO) Draupnir {Nors} (drawp-neer) [dripper] Odin’s magic ring: proliferating cycles
  • (TG) Dravidians. A group of tribes inhabiting Southern India; the aborigines.
  • (FY) Dravidians, a group of tribes inhabiting Southern India.
  • (TG) Drayya {Sans}. Substance (metaphysically).
  • (FY) Dravya, substance.
  • (WG) Dravya, thing, object, substance, nine kinds of which are reckoned in the Nyaya philosophy, viz : prithivi, earth; ap, water; tejas, fire; vayu, air; akasa, ether; kala, time; dis, space; atma, soul; and manas, mind.
  • (WG) Driksthiti, the state in which one having converted his internal eye into one of pure knowledge, views the whole of this transitional world as Brahma; the real concentration. ( drik, one who sees, a seer; sthiti, standing, steadiness
  • (TG) Drishti {Sans}. Scepticism; unbelief.
  • (WG) Drishta, seen, perceived.
  • (WG) Drisya, visible, to be seen.
  • (GH) Drona A Brahmana, son of Bharadvaja, who married Kripa, the half-sister of Bhishma, by whom he had a son, Asvatthaman. He was acharya (teacher of the military art) to the Kaurava princes as well as to the Pandavas. Although loving the princes equally, nevertheless because of his relationship to Bhishma, he sided with the Kauravas in the great conflict at Kurukshetra. The words spoken to the ‘preceptor’ in the second sloka (as narrated by Sanjaya — Bhagavad-Gita, W. Q. Judge, p. 2) were addressed by Duryodhana to his teacher, Drona. When Bhishma was mortally wounded on the field of battle, Drona became commander-in-chief of the Kaurava army. (
  • (TG) Druids. A sacerdotal caste which flourished in Britain and Gaul. They were Initiates who admitted females into their sacred order, and initiated them into the mysteries of their religion. They never entrusted their sacred verses and scriptures to writing, but, like the Brahmans of old, committed them to memory; a feat which, according to the statement of Caesar, took twenty years to accomplish. Like the Parsis they had no images or statues of their gods. The Celtic religion considered it blasphemy to represent any god, even of a minor character, under a human figure. It would have been well if the Greek and Roman Christians had learnt this lesson from the “pagan” Druids. The three chief commandments of their religion were: — “Obedience to divine laws; concern for the welfare of mankind; suffering with fortitude all the evils of life”.
  • (GH) Drupada The son of Prishata, king of Panchala (the region adjacent to the land of the Kurus), father of Dhrishtadyumna (‘the clever son’ referred to in the text). He was also the father of Draupadi (the wife of the Pandavas). His son was made commander-in-chief of the Pandava army. ( Bhagavad-Gita, W. Q. Judge, p. 2)
  • (TG) Druzes. A large sect, numbering about 100,000 adherents, living on Mount Lebanon in Syria. Their rites are very mysterious, and no traveller, who has written anything about them, knows for a certainty the whole truth. They are the Sufis — of Syria. They resent being called Druzes as an insult, but call themselves the “disciples of Hamsa”, their Messiah, who came to them in the ninth century from the “Land of the Word of God”, which land and word they kept religiously secret. The Messiah to come will be the same Hamsa, but called Hakem — the “All-Healer”. (See Isis Unveiled,
  • (TG) Dudaim {Hebr}. Mandrakes. The Atropa Mandragora plant is mentioned in Genesis, 30.14 and in Canticles: the name is related in Hebrew to words meaning “breasts” and “love”, the plant was notorious as a love charm, and has been used in many forms of black magic. [w.w.w. ]
  • Ducdaim in Kabbalistic parlance is the Soul and Spirit; any two things united in love and friendship (dodim). “Happy is he who preserves his dudaim (higher and lower Manas) inseparable.”
  • (TG) Dugpas {Tibe}. Lit., “Red Caps,” a sect in Tibet. Before the advent of Tsong-ka-pa in the fourteenth century, the Tibetans, whose Buddhism had deteriorated and been dreadfully adulterated with the tenets of the old Bhon religion, — were all Dugpas. From that century, however, and after the rigid laws imposed upon the Gelukpas (yellow caps) and the general reform and purification of Buddhism (or Lamaism), the Dugpas have given themselves over more than ever to sorcery, immorality, and drunkenness. Since then the word Dugpa has become a synonym of “sorcerer”, “adept of black magic” and everything vile. There are few, if any, Dugpas in Eastern Tibet, but they congregate in Bhutan, Sikkim, and the borderlands generally. Europeans not being permitted to penetrate further than those borders, the Orientalists never having studied Buddho-Lamaism in Tibet proper, but judging of it on hearsay and from what Cosmo di Koros, Schlagintweit, and a few others have learnt of it from Dugpas, confuse both religions and bring then) under one head. They thus give out to the public pure Dugpaism instead of Buddho-Lamaism. In short Northern Buddhism in its purified, metaphysical form is almost entirely unknown.
  • (VS) dread Dad- Dugpa clan (III 11) [[p. 51]] The Bhons or Dugpas , the sect of the “Red Caps,” are regarded as the most versed in sorcery. They inhabit Western and little Tibet and Bhutan. They are all Tantrikas. It is quite ridiculous to find Orientalists who have visited the borderlands of Tibet, such as Schlagintweit and others, confusing the rites and disgusting practices of these with the religious beliefs of the Eastern Lamas, the “Yellow Caps,” and their Narjols or holy men. The following is an instance.
  • (FY) Dugpas, the “Red Caps,” evil magicians, belonging to the left-hand path of occultism, so called in Tibet.
  • (WG) Dugpa (Thibetan), a sorcerer or “red-cap” of Bhootan.
  • (TG) Dukkha {Sans}. Sorrow, pain.
  • (FY) Dukkha, pain.
  • (WG) Duhkha, misery, uneasiness, anguish; pain personified as the son of Narada and Vedana.
  • (TG) Dumah {Hebr}. The Angel of Silence (Death) in the Kabbala.
  • (TG) Durga {Sans}. Lit., “inaccessible”. The female potency of a god; the name of Kali, the wife of Siva, the Mahesvara, or: “the great god”.
  • (WG) Durga, a goddess, the wife of Siva — goddess of destruction, called also Kali.
  • (GH) Duryodhana The eldest son of Dhritarashtra and Gandhari leader of the Kurus (or Kauravas) in the conflict with the Pandavas at Kurukshetra. Because of his blindness, Dhritarashtra had intended to make his brother’s virtuous son, Yudhishthira, the heir-apparent to his throne, but the Kurus under Duryodhana objected so strongly that instead he allowed his son to take charge of the government, and turned over a portion of his kingdom — that of Indraprastha — to the Pandavas. Owing to further machinations of the Kurus, Yudhishthira lost this kingdom in a game of dice, and Duryodhana forced the Pandavas into exile for thirteen years. When this period had elapsed, however, Duryodhana refused to give up the kingdom, and as a consequence the great conflict was waged, in which he lost his life. In the Mahabharata Duryodhana represents the forces of evil battling with the forces of light: one story represents him as doing wicked deeds in spite of himself, and realizing this he attempted to put an end to his life. He was prevented from doing this by the imps of darkness, so that he might continue imbodied for their purposes.
  • Duryodhana is represented as an ambitious, malicious prince, the antithesis of the wise and righteous ruler. (Meaning of the word itself: difficult to conquer. Bhagavad-Gita, W. Q. Judge, p. 1)
  • (TG) Dustcharitra {Sans}. The “ten evil acts”; namely, three acts of the body viz., taking life, theft and adultery; four evil acts of the mouth, viz ., lying, exaggeration in accusations, slander, and foolish talk; and three evil acts of mind (Lower Manas), viz ., envy, malice or revenge, and unbelief.
  • (WG) Dvaita, dualism; a system of philosophy which asserts the distinctness from each other of the human spirit and the universal spirit.
  • (SKf) Dwaita The Vedanta philosophy, which has been called the Adwaita quintessence of the Upanishads, has been divided Visishtadwaita into three main schools: (1) the Adwaita, which reduces all things to one Secondless Unity ( a — not, and dwaita — duality), and thus teaches that the human divinity — Atman, and the Universal Divinity — Brahman, are one; (2) the Dwaita which teaches an eternal duality, that is, that Atman and Brahman are ever separate Principles; and (3) the Visishtadwaita which differentiates between the two other schools and teaches that Atman is a part of Brahman. Visishtadwaita is a compound of visishta — distinguished or qualified, derived from the verb-root visish — to distinguish, and adwaita — non-duality.
  • These three sects of Dualists, Qualified Non-Dualists, and Non-Dualists teach the same fundamental truths but they interpret them from different points of view. They could be said to represent three steps in the understanding of Divinity or God: (1) the Dwaita -step — Divinity is somewhere outside of us; (2) the Visishtadwaita -step — We are parts of Divinity, and Divinity manifests everywhere; and (3) the Adwaita -step — I am Divinity, All is Divinity. This last step is one with the esoteric wisdom-teaching: Aham Brahmasmi — I am Brahman.
  • (MO) Dvalin {Nors} (dvah-leen) [comatose] The human, unawakened soul; Dvalin’s toy, the solar disk
  • (GH) Dvamdva A pair of opposites ( e.g., heat and cold, joy and sorrow, etc The dvamdva compound in the text has reference to a copulative compound, i.e., two members of a compound which are in the same case and likewise may be connected with the conjunction and. (Meaning of the word itself: two and two: the word is the num. adjective . dva, two, reduplicated
  • (WG) Dvapara . (See Dvapara-yuga
  • (TG) Dwapara Yuga {Sans}. The third of the “Four Ages” in Hindu Philosophy; or the second age counted from below.
  • (WG) Dvapara-yuga, the third of the four ages. (See Yuga
  • (WG) Dvaraka, Krishna’s city, submerged by the sea. A temple still remains on the peninsula of Guzerat, an object of pilgrimage. (Literally, “city with many gates.”)
  • (WG) Dvesha, hate.
  • (TG) Dwarf of Death. In the Edda of the Norsemen, Iwaldi, the Dwarf of Death, hides Life in the depths of the great ocean, and then sends her up into the world at the right time. This Life is Iduna, the beautiful maiden, the daughter of the “Dwarf”. She is the Eve of the Scandinavian Lays, for she gives of the apples of ever-renewed youth to the gods of Asgard to eat; but these, instead of being cursed for so doing and doomed to die, give thereby renewed youth yearly to the earth and to men, after every short and sweet sleep in the arms of the Dwarf. Iduna is raised from the Ocean when Bragi, the Dreamer of Life, without spot or blemish, crosses asleep the silent waste of waters. Bragi is the divine ideation of Life, and Iduna living Nature — Prakriti, Eve.
  • (MO) Dwarfs {Nors} Souls less than human in evolutionary status
  • (TG) Dwellers (on the Threshold). A term invented by Bulwer Lytton in Zanoni; but in Occultism the word “Dweller” is an occult term used by students for long ages past, and refers to certain maleficent astral Doubles of defunct persons.
  • (WG) Dweller on the Threshold, found in Lytton’s Zanoni ; the shades of defunct bad men in Kamaloka, full of evil, able to do evil, and with a kind of intelligence not easily explained; also the combined evil thoughts of the race and family to which every one belongs, and said to become, as it were, visible when one passes the threshold of ordinary experience.
  • (OG) Dweller on the Threshold — A literary invention of the English mystic and novelist Sir Bulwer Lytton, found in his romance Zanoni . The term has obtained wide currency and usage in theosophical circles. In occultism the word “dweller,” or some exactly equivalent phrase or expression, has been known and used during long ages past. It refers to several things, but more particularly has an application to what H. P. Blavatsky calls “certain maleficent astral Doubles of defunct persons.” This is exact. But there is another meaning of this phrase still more mystical and still more difficult to explain which refers to the imbodied karmic consequences or results of the man’s past, haunting the thresholds which the initiant or initiate must pass before he can advance or progress into a higher degree of initiation. These dwellers, in the significance of the word just last referred to are, as it were, the imbodied quasi-human astral haunting parts of the constitution thrown off in past incarnations by the man who now has to face them and overcome them — very real and living beings, parts of the “new” man’s haunting past. The initiant must face these old “selves” of himself and conquer or — fail, which failure may mean either insanity or death. They are verily ghosts of the dead men that the present man formerly was, now arising to dog his footsteps, and hence are very truly called Dwellers on the Threshold. In a specific sense they may be truly called the kama-rupas of the man’s past incarnations arising out of the records in the astral light left there by the “old” man of the “new” man who now is.
  • (TG) Dwesa {Sans}. Anger. One of the three principal states of mind (of which 63 are enumerated), which are Raga — pride or evil desire, Dwesa — anger, of which hatred is a part, and Moha — the ignorance of truth. These three are to be steadily avoided.
  • (TG) Dwija {Sans}. “Twice-born”. In days of old this term was used only of the Initiated Brahmans; but now it is applied to every man belonging to the first of the four castes, who has undergone a certain ceremony.
  • (SP) Dvija [dwija] — literally “twice-born,” a Hindu of one of the higher classes, especially a Brahmana, who has undergone the second birth of ritual initiation and investment with the sacred thread.
  • (WG) Dvija, an initiated Brahman, Kshatriya, or Vaishya. ( dvi , twice; ja, born: twice-born
  • (SKf) Dvija A ‘Twice-born One,’ a spiritual Initiate; a compound of dvi — two, and ja — derived from the verb-root jan — to be born. A Dvija according to Theosophy and also according to the once pure Brahmanical religion refers to one who has definitely awakened spiritually and intellectually and has undergone the trials of Initiation. A true Dvija is therefore a man who has been born physically as well as spiritually; but in India today any man who is invested with the sacred thread of the Brahmanical religion is called a Dvija.
  • (TG) Dwija Brahman {Sans}. The investure with the sacred thread that now constitutes the “second birth”. Even a Sudra who chooses to pay for the honour becomes, after the ceremony of passing through a silver or golden cow — a dwija .
  • (FY) Dwija Brahman, twice born; the investiture with the sacred thread constitutes the second birth.
  • (WG) Dwijadrushta, the inner vision.
  • (TG) Dwipa {Sans}. An island or a continent. The Hindus have seven (Sapta dwipa); the Buddhists only four. This is owing to a misunderstood reference of the Lord Buddha who, using the term metaphorically, applied the word dwipa to the races of men. The four Root-races which preceded our fifth, were compared by Siddhartha to four continents or isles which studded the ocean of birth and death — Samsara.
  • (WG) Dvipa, an island, peninsula, any land surrounded by water; any continent on which a root-race is evolved.
  • (WG) Dwipa, the same as Dvipa. There are said to be seven Dwipas, and these are the great divisions of the world as given in the allegories of the Puranas. There names are: Jambu, Plaksha , Shalmali, Kusha, Krauncha, Shaka, and Pushkara . An explanation of these allegorical divisions will be found in The Path for April and May, 1889 .
  • (GH) Dvipa A zone, region, land, or continent, commonly called ‘island,’ inasmuch as each dvipa is described as being surrounded by distinct concentric circumambient oceans centering about Mount Meru. Seven dvipas are enumerated as follows: Jambu, Plaksha, Salmali Kusa, Krauncha, Saka, and Pushkara. Esoterically the dvipas refer on the one hand to the seven globes of the Planetary Chain of this Earth, and on the other hand to the seven great continents which come successively into existence as the homes of the seven Root-Races. Jambu-dvipa corresponds to Globe D of the Chain, Mount Meru rising from its center. ( Secret Doctrine, II, p. 320). This dvipa was divided into nine parts termed varshas . ( Bhagavad-Gita, W. Q. Judge, p. ii)
  • (TG) Dynasties. In India there are two, the Lunar and the Solar, or the Somavansa and the Suryavansa. In Chaldea and Egypt there were also two distinct kinds of dynasties, the divine and the human. In both countries people were ruled in the beginning of time by Dynasties of Gods. In Chaldea they reigned one hundred and twenty Sari, or in all 432,000 years; which amounts to the same figures as a Hindu Mahayuga 4,320,000 years. The chronology prefacing the Book of Genesis (English translation) is given “Before Christ, 4004 “. But the figures are a rendering by solar years. In the original Hebrew, which preserved a lunar calculation, the figures are 4,320 years. This “coincidence” is well explained in Occultism.
  • (TG) Dyookna {Hebr}. The shadow of eternal Light. The “Angels of the Presence” or archangels. The same as the Ferouer in the Vendidad and other Zoroastrian works.
  • (TG) Dzyn or Dzyan {Tibe}. Written also Dzen. A corruption of the Sanskrit Dhyan and Jnana (or gnyana phonetically) — Wisdom, divine knowledge. In Tibetan, learning is called dzin.
  • (SK)o Dzyan Dzyan is the Tibetan way of pronouncing and spelling the Sanskrit word Dhyana, a word meaning ‘spiritual meditation.’ The Book of Dzyan is one of an occult series of works known as the Kiu – ti. These scriptures are kept secret and apart and are carefully guarded in Shi-gat-se. H. P. Blavatsky bases much of her Secret Doctrine on the ‘Stanzas of Dzyan,’ because they contain the archaic teachings regarding the origin and building of worlds and races.
  • (IN) Dzyan A “corruption” of{Sans} dhyana (spiritual “meditation”) and jnana (wisdom, divine knowledge).
  • (IN) Dzyu Real knowledge; the collective wisdom of the dhyani-buddhas which becomes fohat.
  • (TG) E. — The fifth letter of the English alphabet. The he (soft) of the Hebrew alphabet becomes in the Ehevi system of reading that language an E. Its numerical value is five, and its symbolism is a window ; the womb, in the Kabbala. In the order of the divine names it stands for the fifth, which is Hadoor or the “majestic” and the “splendid.”
  • (TG) Ea {Chald}. also Hea . The second god of the original Babylonian trinity composed of Anu, Hea and Bel. Hea was the; “Maker of Fate”, “Lord of the Deep”, “God of Wisdom and Knowledge”, and “Lord of the City of Eridu”.
  • (TG) Eagle. This symbol is one of the most ancient. With the Greeks and Persians it was sacred to the Sun; with the Egyptians, under the name of Ah, to Horus, and the Kopts worshipped the eagle under the name of Ahom . It was regarded as the sacred emblem of Zeus by the Greeks, and as that of the highest god by the Druids. The symbol has passed down to our day, when following the example of the pagan Marius, who, in the second century B.C. used the double-headed eagle as the ensign of Rome, the Christian crowned heads of Europe made the double-headed sovereign of the air sacred to themselves and their scions. Jupiter was satisfied with a one-headed eagle and so was the Sun. The imperial houses of Russia, Poland, Austria, Germany, and the late Empire of the Napoleons, have adopted a two-headed eagle as their device.
  • (TG) Easter. The word evidently comes from Ostara, the Scandinavian goddess of spring. She was the symbol of the resurrection of all nature and was worshipped in early spring. It was a custom with the pagan Norsemen at that time to exchange coloured eggs called the eggs of Ostara. These have now become Easter-Eggs . As expressed in Asgard and the Gods : “Christianity put another meaning on the old custom, by connecting it with the feast of the Resurrection of the Saviour, who, like the hidden life in the egg, slept in the grave for three days before he awakened to new life”. This was the more natural since Christ was identified with that same Spring Sun which awakens in all his glory, after the dreary and long death of winter. (See “Eggs”
  • (TG) Ebionites {Hebr}. Lit., “the poor”; the earliest sect of Jewish Christians, the other being the Nazarenes. They existed when the term “Christian” was not yet heard of. Many of the relations of Iassou (Jesus), the adept ascetic around whom the legend of Christ was formed, were among the Ebionites. As the existence of these mendicant ascetics can be traced at least a century earlier than chronological Christianity, it is an additional proof that Iassou or Jeshu lived during the reign of Alexander Jannaeus at Lyd or (Lud), where he was put to death as stated in the Sepher Toldos Jeshu .
  • (TG) Ecbatana. A famous city in Media worthy of a place among the seven wonders of the world. It is thus described by Draper in his Conflict between Religion and Science, chap. 1, . . .”The cool summer retreat of the Persian Kings, was defended by seven encircling walls of hewn and polished blocks, the interior ones in succession of increasing height, and of different colours, in astrological accordance with the seven planets. The palace was roofed with silver tiles; its beams were plated with gold. At midnight in its halls, the sun was rivalled by many a row of naphta (or naptha) cressets. A paradise, that luxury of the monarchs of the East, was planted in the midst of the city. The Persian Empire was truly the garden of the world.”
  • (TG) Echath {Hebr}. The same as the following [Echod] — the “One”, but feminine.
  • (TG) Echod {Hebr}, or Echad . “One”, masculine, applied to Jehovah.
  • (TG) Eclectic Philosophy. One of the names given to the Neo-Platonic school of Alexandria.
  • (TG) Ecstasis {Greek}. A psycho-spiritual state; a physical trance which induces clairvoyance and a beatific state bringing on visions.
  • (KT) Ecstasis {Greek} A psycho-spiritual state; a physical trance which induces clairvoyance, and a beatific state which brings on visions.
  • (TG) Edda (Iceland. Lit., “great-grandmother” of the Scandinavian Lays. It was Bishop Brynjuld Sveinsson, who collected them and brought them to light in 1643. There are two collections of Sagas, translated by the Northern Skalds, and there are two Eddas . The earliest is of unknown authorship and date and its antiquity is very great. These Sagas were collected in the 11th century by an Icelandic priest; the second is a collection of the history (or myths) of the gods spoken of in the first, which became the Germanic deities, giants, dwarfs and heroes.
  • (MO) Edda {Nors} [great-grandmother] Matrix of human wisdom
  • (TG) Eden {Hebr}. “Delight”, pleasure. In Genesis the “Garden of Delight” built by God; in the Kabbala the “Garden of Delight”, a place of Initiation into the mysteries. Orientalists identify it with a place which was situated in Babylonia in the district of Karduniyas, called also Gan-dunu, which is almost like the Gan-eden of the Jews That district has four rivers, Euphrates, Tigris, Surappi, Ukni. The two first have been adopted without any change by the Jews; the other two they have probably transformed into “Gihon and Pison”, so as to have something original. The following are some of the reasons for the identification of Eden, given by Assyriologists. The cities of Babylon, Larancha and Sippara, were founded before the flood, according to the chronology of the Jews. “Surippak was the city of the ark, the mountain east of the Tigris was the resting place of the ark, Babylon was the site of the tower, and Ur of the Chaldees the birthplace of Abraham.” And, as Abraham, “the first leader of the Hebrew race, migrated from Ur to Harran in Syria and from thence to Palestine”, the best Assyriologists think that it is “so much evidence in favour of the hypothesis that Chaldea was the original home of these stories (in the Bible) and that the Jews received them originally from the Babylonians”.
  • (TG) Edom {Hebr}. Edomite Kings. A deeply concealed mystery is to be found in the allegory of the seven Kings of Edom, who “reigned in the land of Edom before there reigned any King over the children of Israel The Kabbala teaches that this Kingdom was one of “unbalanced forces” and necessarily of unstable character. The world of Israel is a type of the condition of the worlds which came into existence subsequently to the later period when the equilibrium had become established. [w.w.w.]
  • On the other hand the Eastern Esoteric philosophy teaches that the seven Kings of Edom are not the type of perished worlds or unbalanced forces, but the symbol of the seven human Root-races, four of which have passed away, the fifth is passing, and two are still to come. Though in the language of esoteric blinds, the hint in St. John’s Revelation is clear enough when it states in chapter xvii, 10: “And there are seven Kings; five are fallen, and one (the fifth, still) is, and the other (the sixth Root-race) is not yet come. . . . . “Had all the seven Kings of Edom perished as worlds of “unbalanced forces”, how could the fifth still be, and the other or others “not yet come”! In The Kabbalah Unveiled, we read on page 48, “The seven Kings had died and their possessions had been broken up”, and a footnote emphasizes the statement by saying, “these seven Kings are the Edomite Kings”.
  • (TG) Edris {arabic}, or Idris . Meaning “the learned One”, an epithet applied by the Arabs to Enoch.
  • (TG) Eggs (Easter). Eggs were symbolical from an early time. There was the “Mundane Egg”, in which Brahma gestated, with the Hindus the Hiranya-Gharba, and the Mundane Egg of the Egyptians, which proceeds from the mouth of the “unmade and eternal deity”, Kneph, and which is the emblem of generative power. Then the Egg of Babylon, which hatched Ishtar, and was said to have fallen from heaven into the Euphrates. Therefore coloured eggs were used yearly during spring in almost every country, and in Egypt were exchanged as sacred symbols in the spring-time, which was, is, and ever will be, the emblem of birth or rebirth, cosmic and human, celestial and terrestrial. They were hung up in Egyptian temples and are so suspended to this day in Mahometan mosques.
  • (WG) Egg of the World, the egg form assumed by the Supreme Spirit, according to the Rig-Veda, from which the world is evolved.
  • (TG) Egkosmioi {Greek} “The intercosmic gods,each of which presides over a great number of daemons, to whom they impart their power and change it from one to another at will”, says Proclus, and he adds, that which is taught in the esoteric doctrine. In his system he shows the uppermost regions from the zenith of the Universe to the moon belonging to the gods, or planetary Spirits, according to their hierarchies and classes. The highest among them were the twelve Huper-ouranioi, the super-celestial gods. Next to the latter, in rank and power, came the Egkosmioi .
  • (MO) Egil {Nors} (ay-gil) An early humanity, the age of innocence
  • (TG) Ego {Latin}. “Self”; the consciousness in man “I am I” — or the feeling of “I-am-ship”. Esoteric philosophy teaches the existence of two Egos in man, the mortal or personal, and the Higher, the Divine and the Impersonal, calling the former “personality” and the latter “Individuality”.
  • (KT) Ego {Latin} “I”; the consciousness in man of the “I am I,” or the feeling of I-am-ship. Esoteric philosophy teaches the existence of two Egos in man, the mortal or personal, and the higher, the divine or impersonal, calling the former “personality,” and the latter “individuality.”
  • (VS) Deva Egos [[p. 29]] The reincarnating Ego.
  • (WG) Ego (Latin), I; myself; self.
  • (OG) Ego — (Latin) A word meaning “I.” In theosophical writings the ego is that which says “I am I” — indirect or reflected consciousness, consciousness reflected back upon itself as it were, and thus recognizing its own mayavi existence as a “separate” entity. On this fact is based the one genuine “heresy” that occultism recognizes: the heresy of separateness.
  • The seat of the human ego is the intermediate duad — manas-kama: part aspiring upwards, which is the reincarnating ego; and part attracted below, which is the ordinary or astral human ego. The consciousness is immortal in the reincarnating ego, and temporary or mortal in the lower or astral human ego.
  • Consider the hierarchy of the human being’s constitution to grow from the immanent Self: this last is the seed of egoity on the seven (or perhaps better, six) planes of matter or manifestation. On each one of these seven planes (or six), the immanent Self or paramatman develops or evolves a sheath or garment, the upper ones spun of spirit, and the lower ones spun of “shadow” or matter. Now each such sheath or garment is a “soul”; and between the self and such a soul — any soul — is the ego.
  • Thus atman is the divine monad, giving birth to the divine ego, which latter evolves forth the monadic envelope or divine soul; jivatman, the spiritual monad, has its child which is the spiritual ego, which in turn evolves forth the spiritual soul or individual; and the combination of these three considered as a unit is buddhi; bhutatman, the human ego — the higher human soul, including the lower buddhi and higher manas; pranatman, the personal ego — the lower human soul, or man. It includes manas, kama, and prana; and finally the beast ego — the vital-astral soul: kama and prana. WW Ego Ego is something which most people find very hard to suppress, but we will do our best to dispose of it in the short time that remains. Ego means I. The equivalent word for ego, corresponding to individuality and personality, is egoity, the nature and characteristics of the ego. The ego is the sense of ‘I-ness’, conceived by most Christian writers as the very highest aspect of consciousness. It is not so. If I had time (and we may have to take it up in our next study) we would see that this sense of ego, or egoism, as contrasted with egoity, is one of the lowest aspects. Every man or person, even every animal, has his or its ego, its ‘I’. The personalities of animals are as distinct in their own way — small and restricted — as the personalities of man, and the collection of attributes composing the personality forms at any one moment the vehicle of the ego. The ego is rooted in the person and is so to say the backside of the person; as for instance, an orange is a sphere, or nearly so, so its personality is its yellowness, its acidity, its septa or the division into which it can be cut or torn, while the ego is the same as that plus a sense of consciousness if we choose to endow our orange with the sense of consciousness. So in man, his person is all that he is, his loves, his hates, the way he loves and hates, his longings, and his desires, the way he longs and desires, centered about a consciousness, a conscious center; that is the ego. The person is the expression of the ego, and the attributes composing the person are the personality. The ego, therefore, being the conscious center manifesting in the soul on a certain plane of maya or matter, is a low expression of the individuality. Therefore we may say that the ego changes pari passu with the person. As man progresses, his ego expands (or diminishes, whichever you please), refines itself; as he retrogresses, his ego, pari passu, grows in concentration, intensity, force, power, until finally it reaches a point where its ferocity, its cold, cruel, calculating selfishness makes a monster in human form, and this is on the precipice where a step further leads to the perdition of the soul.
  • (TG) Egoity. From the word “Ego”. Egoity means “individuality”, never “personality”, and is the opposite of egoism or “selfishness”, the characteristic par excellence of the latter.
  • (KT) Egoity (from the word “Ego”). Egoity means “individuality” — indifferent — never “personality,” as it is the opposite of Egoism or “selfishness,” the characteristic par excellence of the latter.
  • (TG) Egregores. Eliphas Levi calls them “the chiefs of the souls who are the spirits of energy and action”; whatever that may or may not mean. The Oriental Occultists describe the Egregores as Beings whose bodies and essence is a tissue of the so-called astral light . They are the shadows of the higher Planetary Spirits whose bodies are of the essence of the higher divine light.
  • (TG) Eheyeh {Hebr}. “I am”, according to Ibn Gebirol, but not in the sense of “I am that I am”.
  • (TG) Eidolon {Greek}. The same as that which we term the human phantom, the astral form.
  • (KT) Eidolon {Greek} The same as that which we term the human phantom, the Astral form.
  • (OG) Eidolon — (Greek; plural eidola ) A word meaning “image” of the man that was. After death there remains in the astral world — which is on the other side of the threshold of physical life, the etheric world — the “shadow” of the man that was. The ancients called these human shadows, shades; modern children and nursemaids call them ghosts and spooks; and each such shade is but an eidolon, or astral image or pale copy of the physical man that was. This eidolon coheres for a while in the astral realms or in the superphysical ether, and its particles are magnetically held more or less coherent as long as the physical corpse is not fully dissolved into its component elements; but these eidola in a comparatively short time fade out, for they decay in a manner closely resembling the disintegration of the physical body.
  • (OG) Eighth Sphere or Planet of Death — A term used in the more esoteric or inner part of the teachings about which little can be said, for over this part of the doctrine there has always been drawn a thick veil of secrecy and silence.
  • Frequently the term is confused with avichi, but this is incorrect, because the two, while closely connected, are nevertheless quite distinct. While avichi is a state where very evil human beings ” die and are reborn without interruption ,” yet not without hope of final redemption — something which can actually take place even on our physical plane in the cases of very evil or soulless men — the Eighth Sphere represents a degree of psychomental degeneration still more advanced. As just hinted, even in avichi there is a possibility of reinsoulment by the ray of the spiritual monad; whereas in the Eighth Sphere or Planet of Death such possibility finally vanishes, and the entity which has sunk to the Planet of Death is what is technically called in the esoteric philosophy a “lost soul.” In the Eighth Sphere the lost souls are ground over and over in nature’s laboratory, and are finally dissipated into their component psycho-astral elements or life-atoms. The Eighth Sphere or Planet of Death is an actual globe. It is also of course a state or condition of being; whereas the avichi is almost exclusively a state or condition in which an entity may find itself, although obviously this entity must have position or place and therefore locality in space — on our earth or elsewhere.
  • (WG) Eight Superhuman Faculties . These are given under Vibhuti , which see.
  • (TG) Eka {Sans}. “One”; also a synonym of Mahat, the Universal Mind, as the principle of Intelligence.
  • (WG) Eka, one, single.
  • (WG) Ekagrata, one-pointed; the perfect concentration of contemplation. ( eka, one; agrata, pointed
  • (OG) Ekagrata {Sans} Ekagratva {Sans} A term signifying “onepointedness” or “absolute intentness” in the mental contemplation of an object of meditation. The perfect concentration of the percipient mind on a single point of thought, and the holding of it there.
  • (TG) Ekana-rupa {Sans}. The One (and the Many) bodies or forms; a term applied by the Puranas to Deity.
  • (WG) Ekanekarupa, the one and the many in outward form.
  • (TG) Ekasloka Shastra {Sans}. A work on the Shastras (Scriptures) by Nagarjuna; a mystic work translated into Chinese.
  • (MO) Eldrimner {Nors} [ eld fire + rimner computation, calendar] One of the boars that feed the One-harriers
  • (TG) El-Elion {Hebr}. A name of the Deity borrowed by the Jews from the Phoenician Elon, a name of the Sun.
  • (TG) Elementals. Spirits of the Elements. The creatures evolved in the four Kingdoms or Elements — earth, air, fire, and water. They are called by the Kabbalists, Gnomes (of the earth), Sylphs (of the air), Salamanders (of the fire), and Undines (of the water). Except a few of the higher kinds, and their rulers, they are rather forces of nature than ethereal men and women. These forces, as the servile agents of the Occultists, may produce various effects; but if employed by “Elementaries” — in which case they enslave the mediums — they all deceive the credulous. All the lower invisible beings generated on the 5th, 6th, and 7th planes of our terrestrial atmosphere, are called Elementals: Peris, Devs, Djins, Sylvans, Satyrs, Fauns, Elves, Dwarfs, Trolls, Kobolds, Brownies, Nixies, Goblins, Pinkies, Banshees. Moss People, White Ladies, Spooks, Fairies, etc., etc., etc.
  • (IU) Elemental Spirits. — The creatures evolved in the four kingdoms of earth, air, fire, and water, and called by the kabalists gnomes, sylphs, salamanders, and undines. They may be termed the forces of nature, and will either operate effects as the servile agents of general law, or may be employed by the disembodied spirits — whether pure or impure — and by living adepts of magic and sorcery, to produce desired phenomenal results. Such beings never become men. [Persons who believe in the clairvoyant power, but are disposed to discredit the existence of any other spirits in nature than disembodied human spirits, will be interested in an account of certain clairvoyant observations which appeared in the London Spiritualist of June 29, 1877. A thunder-storm approaching, the seeress saw “a bright spirit emerge from a dark cloud and pass with lightning speed across the sky, and, a few minutes after, a diagonal line of dark spirits in the clouds.” These are the Maruts of the “Vedas” (See Max Muller’s “Rig-Veda Sanhita”).
  • The well-known and respected lecturer, author, and clairvoyant, Mrs. Emma Hardinge-Britten, has published accounts of her frequent experiences with these elemental spirits.]
  • Under the general designation of fairies, and fays, these spirits of the elements appear in the myth, fable, tradition, or poetry of all nations, ancient and modern. Their names are legion — peris, devs, djins, sylvans, satyrs, fauns, elves, dwarfs, trolls, norns, nisses, kobolds, brownies, necks, stromkarls, undines, nixies, salamanders, goblins, ponkes, banshees, kelpies, pixies, moss people, good people, good neighbors, wild women, men of peace, white ladies — and many more. They have been seen, feared, blessed, banned, and invoked in every quarter of the globe and in every age. Shall we then concede that all who have met them were hallucinated?
  • These elementals are the principal agents of disembodied but never visible spirits at seances, and the producers of all the phenomena except the subjective.
  • (KT) Elementals, or Spirits of the Elements. The creatures evolved in the Four Kingdoms, or Elements — Earth, Air, Fire, and Water. They are called by the Kabalists, Gnomes (of the Earth), Sylphs (of the Air), Salamanders (of the Fire), and Undines (of the Water), except a few of the higher kinds and their rulers. They are rather the forces of nature than ethereal men and women. These forces, as the servile agents of the occultist, may produce various effects; but if employed by elementaries (Kamarupas) — in which case they enslave the mediums — they will deceive. All the lower invisible beings generated on the fifth, sixth, and seventh Planes of our terrestrial atmosphere are called Elementals — Peris, Devs, Djins, Sylvans, Satyrs, Fauns, Elves, Dwarfs, Trolls, Norns, Kobolds, Brownies, Nixies, Goblins, Pinkies, Banshees, Moss People, White Ladies, Spooks, Fairies, etc., etc.
  • (FY) Elementals, generic name for all subjective beings other than disembodied human creatures.
  • (WG) Elementals #6nn, nature-spirits presiding over the elements of fire, air, etc.; beings evolved from or constituting the lower, elemental nature of man; centers of force in the astral light.
  • (OG) Elemental(s) — Nature-spirits or sprites. The theosophical usage, however, means beings who are beginning a course of evolutionary growth, and who thus are in the elemental states of their growth. It is a generalizing term for purposes of convenient expression for all beings evolutionally below the minerals. Nevertheless, the minerals themselves are expressions of one family or host or hierarchy of elemental beings of a more evolved type. The vegetable kingdom likewise manifests merely one family or host of elemental beings happening to be in the vegetable phase of their evolution on this earth. Just so likewise is it as regards the beasts. The beasts are highly evolved elemental beings, relatively speaking. Men in far distant aeons of the kosmic past were elemental beings also. We have evolved from that elemental stage into becoming men, expressing with more or less ease, mostly very feebly, the innate divine powers and faculties locked up in the core of the core of each one of us.
  • An elemental is a being who has entered our universe on the lowest plane or in the lowest world, degree, or step on the rising stairway of life; and this stairway of life begins in any universe at its lowest stage, and ends for that universe in its highest stage — the universal kosmic spirit. Thus the elemental passes from the elemental stage through all the realms of being as it rises along the stairway of life, passing through the human stage, becoming superhuman, quasi-divine — a quasi-god — then becoming a god. Thus did we humans first enter this present universe.
  • Every race of men on earth has believed in these hosts of elemental entities — some visible, like men, like the beasts, like the animate plants; and others invisible. The invisible entities have been called by various names: fairies, sprites, hobgoblins, elves, brownies, pixies, nixies, leprechauns, trolls, kobolds, goblins, banshees, fawns, devs, jinn, satyrs, and so forth. The medieval mystics taught that these elemental beings were of four general kinds: those arising in and frequenting the element of fire — salamanders; those arising in and frequenting the element air — sylphs; those arising in and frequenting the element water — undines; those arising in and frequenting the element earth — gnomes.
  • (IN) Elementals Ethereal beings born from and animating the elements; classes of beings evolutionally lower than the minerals.
  • (TG) Elementaries. Properly, the disembodied souls of the depraved; these souls having at some time prior to death separated from themselves their divine spirits, and so lost their chance for immortality; but at the present stage of learning it has been thought best to apply the term to the spooks or phantoms of disembodied persons, in general, to those whose temporary habitation is the Kama Loka. Eliphas Levi and some other Kabbalists make little distinction between elementary spirits who have been men, and those beings which people the elements, and are the blind forces of nature. Once divorced from their higher triads and their bodies, these souls remain in their Kama-rupic envelopes, and are irresistibly drawn to the earth amid elements congenial to their gross natures. Their stay in the Kama Loka varies as to its duration, but ends invariably in disintegration, dissolving like a column of mist, atom by atom, in the surrounding elements.
  • (IU) Elementary Spirits. — Properly, the disembodied souls of the depraved; these souls having at some time prior to death separated from themselves their divine spirits, and so lost their chance for immortality. Eliphas Levi and some other kabalists make little distinction between elementary spirits who have been men, and those beings which people the elements, and are the blind forces of nature. Once divorced from their bodies, these souls (also called “astral bodies”) of purely materialistic persons, are irresistibly attracted to the earth, where they live a temporary and finite life amid elements congenial to their gross natures. From having never, during their natural lives, cultivated their spirituality, but subordinated it to the material and gross, they are now unfitted for the lofty career of the pure, disembodied being, for whom the atmosphere of earth is stifling and mephitic, and whose attractions are all away from it. After a more or less prolonged period of time these material souls will begin to disintegrate, and finally, like a column of mist, be dissolved, atom by atom, in the surrounding elements.
  • (WG) Elementary #6nn, the psychic remnant left in the astral sphere after death, where it eventually becomes dissipated. Though abandoned by the real Ego, it may retain the elements of the lower personality, and through accession of force from elementals, or from a living mediumistic person, may present a spurious semblance of the dead, which is easily mistaken for the spirit of that person. The Kabalistic works call the elementals without distinguishing them from the dead.
  • (OG) Elementaries — “Properly, the disembodied souls of the depraved; these souls having at some time prior to death separated from themselves their divine spirits, and so lost their chance for immortality” ( Theosophical Glossary, H. P. Blavatsky).
  • Strictly speaking, the word “elementaries” should be used as H. P. Blavatsky defines it in this quotation from her. But in modern theosophical literature the word has come to signify more particularly the phantoms or eidola of disembodied persons, these phantoms or eidola really being the kama-rupic shades, with especial application to the cases of grossly materialistic ex-humans whose evil impulses and appetites still inhering in the kama-rupic phantom draw these phantoms to physical spheres congenial to them. They are a real danger to psychical health and sanity, and literally haunt living human beings possessing tendencies akin to their own. They are soulless shells, but still filled with energies of a depraved and ignoble type. Their destiny of course is like that of all other pretas or bhutas — ultimate disintegration; for the gross astral atoms composing them slowly dissolve through the years after the manner of a dissolving column of smoke or a wisp of dark cloud on a mountainside.
  • (TG) Elephanta. An island near Bombay, India, on which are the well-preserved ruins of the cave-temple of that name. It is one of the most ancient in the country and is certainly a Cyclopeian work, though the late J. Fergusson has refused it a great antiquity.
  • (TG) Eleusinia {Greek}. The Eleusinian Mysteries were the most famous and the most ancient of all the Greek Mysteries (save the Samothracian), and were celebrated near the hamlet of Eleusis, not for from Athens. Epiphanius traces them to the days of Inachos founded, as another version has it, by Eumolpus, a King of Thrace and a Hierophant. They were celebrated in honour of Demeter, the Greek Ceres and the Egyptian Isis; and the last act of the performance referred to a sacrificial victim of atonement and a resurrection, when the Initiate was admitted to the highest degree of “Epopt” . The festival of the Mysteries began in the month of Boedromion (September), the time of grape-gathering, and lasted from the 15th to the 22nd, seven days. The Hebrew feast of Tabernacles, the feast of Ingatherings, in the month of Ethanim (the seventh), also began on the 15th and ended on the 22nd of that month. The name of the month (Ethanim) is derived, according to some from Adonim, Adonia, Attenim, Ethanim, and was in honour of Adonai or Adonis (Thammuz), whose death was lamented by the Hebrews in the groves of Bethlehem. The sacrifice of both “Bread and Wine” was performed before the Mysteries of initiation, and during the ceremony the mysteries were divulged to the candidates from the petroma, a kind of book made of two stone tablets (petrai), joined at one side and made to open like a volume. (See Isis Unveiled II.,
  • (KT) Eleusinia {Greek} The Eleusinian Mysteries were the most famous and the most ancient of all the Greek mysteries (save the Samothracian), and were performed near the hamlet of Eleusis, not far from Athens. Epiphanius traces them to the days of Iacchos Demeter, the great Ceres, and the Egyptian Isis; and the last act of the performance referred to a sacrificial victim of atonement and a resurrection, when the Initiate was admitted to the highest degree of Epopt. The festival of the Mysteries began in the month of Boedromion (September), the time of grape-gathering, and lasted from the 15th to the 22nd — seven days. The Hebrew Feast of Tabernacles — the feast of ingatherings — in the month of Ethanim (the seventh) also began on the 15th and ended on the 22nd of that month. The name of the month (Ethanim) is derived, according to some, from Adonim, Adonia, Attenim, Ethanim, and was in honour of Adonai, or Adonis (Tham), whose death was lamented by the Hebrews in the groves of Bethlehem. The sacrifice of “Bread and Wine” was performed both in the Eleusinia and during the Feast of Tabernacles.
  • (MO) Elf {Nors} [channel] The human soul between spirit and dwarf in man
  • (TG) Elivagar {Nors}. The waters of Chaos, called in the cosmogony of the Norsemen “the stream of Elivagar”.
  • (MO) Eli-vagor {Nors} (ay-lee-vaw-goor) [icicle-waves] Cold streams of matter
  • (TG) Elohim {Hebr}. Also Alhim, the word being variously spelled. Godfrey Higgins, who has written much upon its meaning, always spells it Aliem . The Hebrew letters are aleph, lamed, he , yod, mem, and are numerically, 1, 30, 5, 10, 40 + 86. It seems to be the plural of the feminine noun Eloah, ALH, formed by adding the common plural form I’m, a masculine ending; and hence the whole seems to imply the emitted active and passive essences. As a title it is referred to “Binah” the Supernal Mother, as is also the fuller title IHVH ALHIM, Jehovah Elohim. As Binah leads on to seven succeedent emanations, so “Elohim” has been said to represent a sevenfold power of godhead. [w.w.w.]
  • (WG) Elohim, one of the names occurring in Genesis, which have been rendered in the Christian bible as God and Lord; but the Hebrews had a different meaning, and the word may be translated as plural.
  • (MO) Elohim (ello-heem) [gods, {Heb} pl.] Deity as an aggregate of many infinite forces
  • (IN) Elohim {Heb} plural; Gods, usually translated God; corresponds to the creative logoi or hosts emanated from the First Logos.
  • (TG) Eloi {Gnos}. The genius or ruler of Jupiter ; its Planetary Spirit. (Ses e Origen, Contra Celsum
  • (TG) Elu {Sing} An ancient dialect used in Ceylon.
  • (TG) Emanation the metaphysical meaning, it is opposed to Evolution, yet one with it. Science teaches that evolution is physiologically a mode of generation in which the germ that develops the foetus pre-exists already in the parent, the development and final form and characteristics of that germ being accomplished in nature; and that in cosmology the process takes place blindly through the correlation of the elements, and their various compounds. Occultism answers that this is only the apparent mode, the real process being Emanation, guided by intelligent Forces under an immutable LAW. Therefore, while the Occultists and Theosophists believe thoroughly in the doctrine of Evolution as given out by Kapila and Manu, they are Emanationists rather than Evolutionists . The doctrine of Emanation was at one time universal. It was taught by the Alexandrian as well as by the Indian philosophers, by the Egyptian, the Chaldean and Hellenic Hierophants, and also by the Hebrews (in their Kabbala, and even in Genesis ). For it is only owing to deliberate mistranslation that the Hebrew word asdt has been translated “angels” from the Septuagint, when it means Emanations, Aeons, precisely as with the Gnostics. Indeed, in Deuteronomy (31., 2) the word asdt or ashdt is translated as “fiery law”, whilst the correct rendering of the passage should be “from his right hand went [not a fiery law , but] a fire according to law “; viz ., that the fire of one flame is imparted to, and caught up by another like as in a trail of inflammable substance. This is precisely emanation. As shown in Isis Unveiled : “In Evolution, as it is now beginning to be understood, there is supposed to be in all matter an impulse to take on a higher form — a supposition clearly expressed by Manu and other Hindu philosophers of the highest antiquity. The philosopher’s tree illustrates it in the case of the zinc solution. The controversy between the followers of this school and the Emanationists may be briefly stated thus: The Evolutionist stops all inquiry at the borders of “the Unknowable”; the Emanationist believes that nothing can be evolved — or, as the word means, unwombed or born — except it has first been involved, thus indicating that life is from a spiritual potency above the whole.”
  • (KT) Emanation (The doctrine of) is in its metaphysical meaning opposed to evolution, yet one with it. Science teaches that, physiologically, evolution is a mode of generation in which the germ that develops the foetus pre-exists already in the parent, the development and final form and characteristics of that germ being accomplished by nature; and that (as in its cosmology) the process takes place blindly, through the correlation of the elements and their various compounds. Occultism teaches that this is only the apparent mode, the real process being Emanation, guided by intelligent forces under an immutable LAW. Therefore, while the Occultists and Theosophists believe thoroughly in the doctrine of Evolution as given out by Kapila and Manu, they are Emanationists rather than Evolutionists. The doctrine of Emanation was at one time universal. It was taught by the Alexandrian, as well as by the Indian philosophers, by the Egyptian, the Chaldean, and Hellenic Hierophants, and also by the Hebrews (in their Kabala, and even in Genesis). For it is only owing to deliberate mistranslation that the Hebrew word asdt was translated “angels” from the Septuagint, while it means Emanations, aeons, just as with the Gnostics. Indeed, in Deuteronomy (33. 2) the word asdt or ashdt is translated as “fiery law,” whilst the correct rendering of the passage should be, “from his right went (not a fiery law, but) a fire according to law,” viz., that the fire of one flame is imparted to and caught up by another — like as in a trail of inflammable substance. This is precisely Emanation, as shown in Isis Unveiled. “In Evolution, as it is now beginning to be understood, there is supposed to be in all matter an impulse to take on a higher form — a supposition clearly expressed by Manu and other Hindoo philosophers of the highest antiquity. The philosopher’s tree illustrates it in the case of the zinc solution. The controversy between the followers of this school and the Emanationists may be briefly stated thus: The Evolutionist stops all inquiry at the borders of ‘the unknowable’; the Emanationist believes that nothing can be evolved — or, as the word means, unwombed or born — except it has first been involved, thus indicating that life is from a spiritual potency above the whole.”
  • (TG) Empusa {Greek}. A ghoul, a vampire, an evil demon taking various forms.
  • (TG) En {Chald}. A negative particle, like a in Greek and Sanskrit. The first syllable of “En-Soph”, or no thing that begins or ends, the “Endless”.
  • (TG) En (or Ain ) Soph {Hebr}. The endless, limitless and boundless. The absolute deific Principle, impersonal and unknowable. It means literally “no-thing” i.e ., nothing that could be classed with anything else. The word and ideas are equivalent to the Vedantic conceptions of Parabrahm. [w.w.w.]
  • Some Western Kabbalists, however, contrive to make of IT·, a personal ” He “, a male deity instead of an impersonal deity.
  • (WG) En-Soph, the same as Ain-Soph, which see.
  • (TG) Enoichion {Greek}. Lit., the “inner Eye”; the “Seer”, a reference to the third inner, or Spiritual Eye, the true name for Enoch disfigured from Chanock .
  • (TG) Ens {Greek}. The same as the Greek To On “Being”, or the real Presence in Nature.
  • (WG) Ens, being, existence, essence. With the alchemists the recondite part of a substance from which all its qualities flow. The real Presence in Nature of the Greeks.
  • (TG) Ephesus {Greek}. Famous for its great metaphysical College where Occultism ( Gnosis ) and Platonic philosophy were taught in the days of the Apostle Paul. A city regarded as the focus of secret sciences, and that Gnosis, or Wisdom, which is the antagonist of the perversion of Christo-Esotericism to this day. It was at Ephesus where was the great College of the Essenes and all the lore the Tanaim had brought from the Chaldees .
  • (TG) Epimetheus {Greek}. Lit., “He who takes counsel after ” the event. A brother of Prometheus in Greek Mythology.
  • (TG) Epinoia {Greek}. Thought, invention, design. A name adopted by the Gnostics for the first passive Aeon.
  • (TG) Episcopal Crook. One of the insignia of Bishops, derived from the sacerdotal sceptre of the Etruscan Augurs. It is also found in the hand of several gods.
  • (TG) Epoptes {Greek}. An Initiate. One who has passed his last degree of initiation.
  • (FY) Epopta, Greek for seer.
  • (WG) Epopta (Greek), a seer; one initiated into the Greater Mysteries.
  • (TG) Eridanus {Latin}. Ardan, the Greek name for the river Jordan.
  • (TG) Eros {Greek}. Hesiod makes of the god Eros the third personage of the Hellenic primordial Trinity composed of Ouranos, Gaea and Eros. It is the personified procreative Force in nature in its abstract sense, the propeller to “creation” and procreation. Esoterically, mythology makes of Eros the god of lustful, animal desire, whence the term erotic ; esoterically, it is different.
  • (TG) Eshmim {Hebr}. The Heavens, the Firmament in which are the Sun, Planets and Stars; from the root Sm, meaning to place, dispose; hence, the planets, as disposers. [w.w.w.]
  • (TG) Esoteric {Greek}. Hidden, secret. From the Greek esotericos , “inner”, concealed.
  • (KT) Esoteric. Hidden, secret. From the Greek Esotericos — “inner,” concealed.
  • (WG) Esoteric, hidden, secret, within. From the Greek “Esoterikos”. The term was first applied to the private instructions and doctrines of Pythagoras, taught only to a select number of his pupils and not intended or designed for the general outer body. Opposed to exoteric or public. WW Esoteric The word exoteric we first find used, in much the same sense in which we use it, in the Greek philosopher Aristotle; not, however, that he was the first to have an outer and an inner school; we are merely admitting into our present discourse those things which are considered proved by and which are the consensus of opinion of people of intelligence. We will grant we know that Pythagoras had an inner and an outer school, but Aristotle was among the first to use this particular term ‘exoteric’, and this implies the existence of esoteric doctrines and dogmata to signify expositions of beliefs which were given to the ‘inner circle’. The word esoteric comes from eso ( eso ), inner, and the comparative suffix, terikos ( terikos ) while exoteric exoterikos ( exoterikos ), that which is outside, was used to signify those doctrines, beliefs, tenets which were taught outside the school or publicly — popular, belonging to the people. It is a capital error to consider that exoteric doctrines are unworthy of study. I think that we will agree that no natural fact is beneath the dignity of our examination, is unworthy of being studied. Everything that is has a holy touch upon it, and I think we should consider it from that point: nothing is so divine as a fact. We sometimes hear of matter-of-fact people, and the term has come to signify to most of us people who are so hardheaded that they have little touch of spirituality. They are like the man in Bulwer-Lytton’s Zanoni who sees and admits only the outward, the obvious things. But there is another idea of fact, as the phenomenon of spirit, as the outward evidence of the inward truth. I see a leaf fall in the autumn. Now a man who has the true scientific spirit will see a wonder in that. There is likewise a wonderful meaning in the change of the seasons, in the astronomical and terrestrial laws governing these changes. I plant a seed; the tree into which it will grow, with all its ramifications, all its branches, is a fine symbol of the Unity of Being. The little twigs run into the branch, the branch into a bigger branch, and the trunk is fixed in the earth and receives its nutrition, therefore through its roots, and from its leaves also. In a little thing like the fall of a leaf think of all the mysteries locked up there. Therefore, when we study the ancient religions, the ancient philosophies (and we know that they are now exoteric because they are open and were popular), I believe it to be a capital error to assume that they are unworthy of profound thought and to put them to one side thinking that because they were popular, public, they have no meaning. They are facts, and they are esoteric in so far as we can penetrate into the inner meaning of them. I read some time ago an article written on the difference between Exotericism and Esotericism. The writer’s idea of esotericism seemed to be anything that was wonderful, mysterious, strange, queer, and uncanny; and anything that was natural and open and could be seen and judged by the normal active faculties of men apparently was ‘exoteric’ to him. That is not the definition of religious or philosophical mysteries that is applicable in Theosophy. It is not the definition of Plato nor of Aristotle, nor of the Neo-Platonists, nor again of the Hindu Philosophers. They make a careful distinction, as if they had drawn a mental line, between that which was popular and that which was, not unpopular, but secret. That which was exoteric, the popular, was not untrue, any more than the esoteric; it was simply popular, open, apparent, but yet involved in mystery — hence a subject to study.
  • (TG) Esoteric Bodhism. Secret Wisdom or intelligence from the Greek esotericos “inner”, and the Sanskrit Bodhi, “knowledge”, intelligence — in contradistinction to Buddhi, “the faculty of knowledge or intelligence”, and Buddhism, the philosophy or Law of Buddha (the Enlightened). Also written “Budhism”, from Budha (Intelligence and Wisdom) the Son of Soma.
  • (KT) Esoteric Bodhism. Secret wisdom or intelligence, from the Greek Esotericos, “inner,” and the Sanskrit Bodhi, “knowledge,” in contradistinction to Buddhi, “the faculty of knowledge or intelligence,” and Buddhism, the philosophy or Law of Buddha (the Enlightened). Also written “Budhism,” from Budha (Intelligence, Wisdom) the Son of Soma.
  • (OG) Esoteric Doctrine — The body of mystical and sacred teachings reserved for students of high and worthy character. This body of teachings has been known and studied by highly evolved individuals in all ages. The esoteric doctrine is the common property of mankind, and it has always been thus. In all the various great religions and philosophies of the world, the student will find fundamental principles in each which, when placed side by side and critically examined, are easily discovered to be identical. Every one of such fundamental principles is in every great world religion or world philosophy; hence the aggregate of these world religions or world philosophies contains the entirety of the esoteric doctrine, but usually expressed in exoteric form.
  • However, no one of these world religions or world philosophies gives in clear and explicit shape or form the entirety of the body of teachings which are at its heart; some religions emphasize one or more of such fundamental principles; another religion or philosophy will emphasize others of these principles; in either case others again of the principles remaining in the background. This readily accounts for the fact that the various world religions and world philosophies vary among themselves and often, to the unreflecting mind, superficially seem to have little in common, and perhaps even to be contradictory. The cause of this is the varying manner in which each such religion or philosophy has been given to the world, the form that each took having been best for the period in which it was promulgated. Each such religion or philosophy, having its own racial sphere and period of time, represents the various human minds who have developed it or who, so to say, have translated it to the world in this or in that particular promulgation.
  • These manners or mannerisms of exoteric thinking we may discard if we wish; but it is the fundamental principles behind every great religion or great philosophy which in their aggregate are the universal esoteric doctrine. In this universal esoteric doctrine lies the mystery-field of each great religion or philosophy — this mystery-teaching being always reserved for the initiates. The esoteric philosophy or doctrine has been held from time immemorial in the guardianship of great men, exalted seers and sages, who from time to time promulgate it, or rather portions of it, to the world when the spiritual and intellectual need for so doing arises. The origins of the esoteric doctrine are found in the mystery-teachings of beings from other and spiritual spheres, who incarnated in the early humanity of the third root-race of this fourth round of our globe, and taught the then intellectually nascent mankind the necessary certain fundamental principles or truths regarding the universe and the nature of the world surrounding us.
  • (TG) Essasua. The African and Asiatic sorcerers and serpent charmers.
  • (TG) Essenes. A hellenized word, from the Hebrew Asa, a “healer”. A mysterious sect of Jews said by Pliny to have lived near the Dead Sea per millia saecolorum — for thousands of ages. “Some have supposed them to be extreme Pharisees, and others — which may be the true theory — the descendants of the Benim-nabim of the Bible, and think that they were ‘Kenites’ and Nazarites . They had many Buddhistic ideas and practices; and it is noteworthy that the priests of the Great Mother at Ephesus, Diana-Bhavani with many breasts, were also so denominated. Eusebius, and after him De Quincey, declared them to be the same as the early Christians, which is more than probable. The title ‘brother’, used in the early Church, was Essenean; they were a fraternity, or a koinobion or community like the early converts
  • (IU) Essenes — from Asa, a healer. A sect of Jews said by Pliny to have lived near the Dead Sea ” per millia saeculorum ” — for thousands of ages. Some have supposed them to be extreme Pharisees; and others — which may be the true theory — the descendants of the Benim nabim of the Bible, and think they were “Kenites” and ” Nazarites .” They had many Buddhistic ideas and practices; and it is noteworthy that the priests of the Great Mother at Ephesus, Diana-Bhavani with many breasts, were also so denominated. Eusebius, and after him De Quincey, declared them to be the same as the early Christians, which is more than probable. The title “brother,” used in the early Church, was Essenean: they were a fraternity, or a koinobion or community like the early converts. It is noticeable that only the Sadducees, or Zadokites, the priest-caste and their partisans, persecuted the Christians; the Pharisees were generally scholastic and mild, and often sided with the latter. James the Just was a Pharisee till his death; but Paul or Aher was esteemed a schismatic.
  • (VS) eternal ages (I 11) [[p. 5]] Eternity with the Orientals has quite another signification than it has with us. It stands generally for the 100 years or “age” of Brahma, the duration of a Kalpa or a period of 4,320,000,000 years.
  • (TG) Ether. Students are but too apt to confuse this with Akasa and with Astral Light. It is neither, in the sense in which ether is described by physical Science. Ether is a material agent, though hitherto undetected by any physical apparatus; whereas Akasa is a distinctly spiritual agent, identical, in one sense, with the Anima Mundi, while the Astral Light is only the seventh and highest principle of the terrestrial atmosphere, as undetectable as Akasa and real Ether, because it is something quite on another plane. The seventh principle of the earth’s atmosphere, as said, the Astral Light, is only the second on the Cosmic scale. The scale of Cosmic Forces, Principles and Planes, of Emanations — on the metaphysical — and Evolutions — on the physical plane — is the Cosmic Serpent biting its own tail, the Serpent reflecting the Higher, and reflected in its turn by the lower Serpent. The Caduceus explains the mystery and the four-fold Dodecahedron on the model of which the universe is said by Plato to have been built by the manifested Logos — synthesized by the unmanifested First-Born — yields geometrically the key to Cosmogony and its microcosmic reflection — our Earth.
  • (WG) Ether, in physics and astronomy a hypothetical medium of extreme tenuity universally diffused throughout all space, and which is supposed to be the medium for the transmission of sound and light, and in a sense the basis of form. It corresponds almost exactly to the Astral Light of the Kabalist, which is an aspect of the Akasa. There are differences between the two, however. It should not be confounded with the Ether of the ancients, which might be said to be the same as the Akasa itself, whereas Ether is only an aspect of that.
  • (OG) Ethics — The theosophical teachings are essentially and wholly ethical. It is impossible to understand the sublime wisdom of the gods, the archaic wisdom-religion of the ancients, without the keenest realization of the fact that ethics run like golden threads throughout the entire system or fabric of doctrine and thought of the esoteric philosophy. Genuine occultism, divorced from ethics, is simply unthinkable because impossible. There is no genuine occultism which does not include the loftiest ethics that the moral sense of mankind can comprehend, and one cannot weigh with too strong an emphasis upon this great fact.
  • Ethics in the theosophical philosophy are not merely the products of human thought existing as a formulation of conventional rules proper for human conduct. They are founded on the very structure and character of the universe itself. The heart of the universe is wisdom-love, and these are intrinsically ethical, for there can be no wisdom without ethics, nor can love be without ethics, nor can there be ethics deprived of either love or wisdom.
  • The philosophic reason why the ancients set so much store by what was commonly known as virtus among the Latins, from which we have our modern word “virtue,” is because by means of the teaching originating in the great Mystery schools, they knew that virtues, ethics, were the offspring of the moral instinct in human beings, who derived them in their turn from the heart of the universe — from the kosmic harmony. It is high time that the Occidental world should cast forever into the limbo of exploded superstitions the idea that ethics is merely conventional morality, a convenience invented by man to smooth the asperities and dangers of human intercourse.
  • Of course every scholar knows that the words morals and ethics come from the Latin and Greek respectively, as signifying the customs or habits which it is proper to follow in civilized communities. But this fact itself, which is unquestionable, is in a sense disgraceful, for it would almost seem that we had not yet brought forth a word adequately describing the instinct for right and truth and troth and justice and honor and wisdom and love which we today so feebly express by the words ethics or morals. “Theosophist is who Theosophy does,” wrote H. P. Blavatsky, and wiser and nobler words she never wrote. No one can be a theosophist who does not feel ethic-ally and think ethically and live ethically in the real sense that is hereinbefore described. ( See also Morals)
  • (TG) Eurasians. An abbreviation of “European-Asians”. The mixed coloured races: the children of the white fathers and the dark mothers of India, or vice versa .
  • (KT) Eurasians. An abbreviation of “European-Asians.” The mixed coloured races; the children of the white fathers, and the dark mothers of India, and vice versa.
  • (TG) Evapto. Initiation; the same as Epopteia . WW Evil Now we will put down as a postulate for our future studies that the origin of evil arises in the conflict of wills in the universe, and we see that despite ourselves we come back to the principle of polytheism — the harmony and the conflict of wills. Remember that polytheism means nothing more in itself than the governance of the Universe by spiritual beings. I think that we can fix this fact in our minds by considering the evil in ourselves, the dual nature, the struggle that we all have — two wills; as the German poet said: “Zwei Seelen wohnen, ach, in meiner Brust” — Two souls, ah me! dwell in my breast! — And if he had said “Legions dwell in my breast”, it would have been truer, as we shall see when we come to study the nature of soul. Plutarch opens his Life of Theseus as follows: “As in the books on geography, Sossius Senecio, the writers crowd the countries of which they know nothing, into the furthest margins of their maps, and write upon them legends such as ‘In this direction lie waterless deserts, filled with wild beasts’, or, ‘Unexplored morasses’, or, ‘here it is as cold as Scythia’, or ‘a frozen sea’; so I, in my writings on parallel lives go through that period of time where history rests on the firm basis of facts, and may truly say “all beyond this is portentous and fabulous, inhabited by poets and mythologers, and there is nothing true or certain.” It seems to me, on thinking of the subjects that we have to consider in our preparatory studies, that we are somewhat in the position of Plutarch when he describes the geographers as placing in the further corners of their maps all things which are unknown, because as soon as we begin to study, to investigate the mysteries of the different religions, we find vast tracts of mental territory uncharted. And all over these wide tracts we find legends: ‘Mythological’, or ‘God’s work’, or ‘Unknown’, or ‘The habitation of poets and mythologers’. Yet those are tracts of mental territory which we must study. Like the pioneers in exploration we must force our way into the thought of antiquity, find out what the ancients really meant, and what they intended to say in the works which have come down to us.
  • (TG) Evolution. The development of higher orders of animals from lower. As said in Isis Unveiled: “Modern Science holds but to a one-sided physical evolution, prudently avoiding and ignoring the higher or spiritual evolution, which would force our contemporaries to confess the superiority of the ancient philosophers and psychologists over themselves. The ancient sages, ascending to the UNKNOWABLE, made their starting point from the first manifestation of the unseen, the unavoidable, and, from a strictly logical reasoning, the absolutely necessary creative Being, the Demiurgos of the universe. Evolution began with them from pure spirit, which descending lower and lower down, assumed at last a visible and comprehensible form, and became matter. Arrived at this point, they speculated in the Darwinian method, but on a far more large and comprehensive basis
  • (IU) Evolution. — The development of higher orders of animals from the lower. Modern, or so-called exact science, holds but to a one-sided physical evolution, prudently avoiding and ignoring the higher or spiritual evolution, which would force our contemporaries to confess the superiority of the ancient philosophers and psychologists over themselves. The ancient sages, ascending to the UNKNOWABLE, made their starting-point from the first manifestation of the unseen, the unavoidable, and from a strict logical reasoning, the absolutely necessary creative Beings, the Demiurgos of the universe. Evolution began with them from pure spirit, which descending lower and lower down, assumed that a visible and comprehensible form, and became matter. Arrived at this point, they speculated in the Darwinian method, but on a far more large and comprehensive basis.
  • (IN) the Rig-Veda-Sanhita, the oldest book of the World, [Translated by Max Muller, Professor of Comparative Philology at the Oxford University, England.] (to which even our most prudent Indiologists and Sanscrit scholars assign an antiquity of between two and three thousand years B.C, in the first book, “Hymns to the Maruts,” it is said:
  • ” Not-being and Being are in the highest heaven, in the birthplace of Daksha, in the lap of Aditi” (Mandala, i., Sukta 166).
  • “In the first age of the gods, Being (the comprehensible Deity) was born from Not-being (whom no intellect can comprehend); after it were born the Regions (the invisible), from the Uttanapada.”
  • “From Uttanapada the Earth was born, the Regions (those that are visible) were born from the Earth. Daksha was born of Aditi, and Aditi from Daksha
  • Aditi is the Infinite, and Daksha is daksha-pitarah, literally meaning the fathers of gods, but understood by Max Muller and Roth to mean the fathers of strength, “preserving, possessing, granting faculties.” Therefore, it is easy to see that “Daksha, born of Aditi and Aditi from Daksha,” means what the moderns understand by “correlation of forces;” the more so as we find in this passage (translated by Prof. Muller):
  • “I place Agni, the source of all beings, the father of strength” (iii, 27, 2), a clear and identical idea which prevailed so much in the doctrines of the Zoroastrians, the Magians, and the mediaeval fire-philosophers. Agni is god of fire, of the Spiritual Ether, the very substance of the divine essence of the Invisible God present in every atom of His creation and called by the Rosicrucians the “Celestial Fire.” If we only carefully compare the verses from this Mandala, one of which runs thus: “The Sky is your father, the Earth your mother, Soma your brother, Aditi your sister” (i., 191, 6), [“Dyarih vah pita, prithivi mata, somah bhrata, aditih svasa.”] with the inscription on the Smaragdine Tablet of Hermes, we will find the same substratum of metaphysical philosophy, the identical doctrines!
  • “As all things were produced by the mediation of one being, so all things were produced from this one thing by adaptation: ‘Its father is the sun; its mother is the moon’ . . . etc. Separate the earth from the fire, the subtile from the gross . . . . What I had to say about the operation of the sun is completed” ( Smaragdine Tablet ).’ [As the perfect identity of the philosophical and religious doctrines of antiquity will be fully treated upon in subsequent chapters, we limit our explanations for the present.]
  • Professor Max Muller sees in this Mandala “at last, something like a theogony, though full of contradictions.” [“Rig-Veda-Anhita,” p. 234.] The alchemists, kabalists, and students of mystic philosophy will find therein a perfectly defined system of Evolution in the Cosmogony of a people who lived a score of thousands of years before our era. They will find in it, moreover, a perfect identity of thought and even doctrine with the Hermetic philosophy, and also that of Pythagoras and Plato.
  • (IN) Evolution, as it is now beginning to be understood, there is supposed to be in all matter an impulse to take on a higher form — a supposition clearly expressed by Manu and other Hindu philosophers of the highest antiquity. The philosopher’s tree illustrates it in the case of the zinc solution. The controversy between the followers of this school and the Emanationists may be briefly stated thus: The Evolutionist stops all inquiry at the borders of “the Unknowable;” the Emanationist believes that nothing can be evolved — or, as the word means, unwombed or born — except it has first been involved, thus indicating that life is from a spiritual potency above the whole.
  • (OG) Evolution — As the word is used in theosophy it means the “unwrapping,” “unfolding,” “rolling out” of latent powers and faculties native to and inherent in the entity itself, its own essential characteristics, or more generally speaking, the powers and faculties of its own character: the Sanskrit word for this last conception is svabhava. Evolution, therefore, does not mean merely that brick is added to brick, or experience merely topped by another experience, or that variation is superadded on other variations — not at all; for this would make of man and of other entities mere aggregates of incoherent and unwelded parts, without an essential unity or indeed any unifying principle.
  • (IN) theosophy evolution means that man has in him (as indeed have all other evolving entities) everything that the cosmos has because he is an inseparable part of it. He is its child; one cannot separate man from the universe. Everything that is in the universe is in him, latent or active, and evolution is the bringing forth of what is within; and, furthermore, what we call the surrounding milieu, circumstances — nature, to use the popular word — is merely the field of action on and in which these inherent qualities function, upon which they act and from which they receive the corresponding reaction, which action and reaction invariably become a stimulus or spur to further manifestations of energy on the part of the evolving entity.
  • There are no limits in any direction where evolution can be said to begin, or where we can conceive of it as ending; for evolution in the theosophical conception is but the process followed by the centers of consciousness or monads as they pass from eternity to eternity, so to say, in a beginningless and endless course of unceasing growth.
  • Growth is the key to the real meaning of the theosophical teaching of evolution, for growth is but the expression in detail of the general process of the unfolding of faculty and organ, which the usual word evolution includes. The only difference between evolution and growth is that the former is a general term, and the latter is a specific and particular phase of this procedure of nature.
  • Evolution is one of the oldest concepts and teachings of the archaic wisdom, although in ancient days the concept was usually expressed by the word emanation. There is indeed a distinction, and an important one, to be drawn between these two words, but it is a distinction arising rather in viewpoint than in any actual fundamental difference. Emanation is a distinctly more accurate and descriptive word for theosophists to use than evolution is, but unfortunately emanation is so ill-understood in the Occident, that perforce the accepted term is used to describe the process of interior growth expanding into and manifesting itself in the varying phases of the developing entity. Theosophists, therefore, are, strictly speaking, rather emanationists than evolutionists ; and from this remark it becomes immediately obvious that the theosophist is not a Darwinist, although admitting that in certain secondary or tertiary senses and details there is a modicum of truth in Charles Darwin’s theory adopted and adapted from the Frenchman Lamarck. The key to the meaning of evolution, therefore, in theosophy is the following: the core of every organic entity is a divine monad or spirit, expressing its faculties and powers through the ages in various vehicles which change by improving as the ages pass. These vehicles are not physical bodies alone, but also the interior sheaths of consciousness which together form man’s entire constitution extending from the divine monad through the intermediate ranges of consciousness to the physical body. The evolving entity can become or show itself to be only what it already essentially is in itself — therefore evolution is a bringing out or unfolding of what already preexists, active or latent, within. ( See also Involution)
  • (TG) Exoteric. Outward, public; the opposite of esoteric or hidden.
  • (KT) Exoteric {Greek} Outward, public; the opposite of esoteric or hidden.
  • (WG) Exoteric, public, unconcealed. The opposite of esoteric , which see.
  • (OG) Exoteric — This word, when applied particularly to the great philosophical and religious systems of belief, does not mean false. The word merely means teachings of which the keys have not been openly given. The word seems to have originated in the Peripatetic School of Greece, and to have been born in the mind of Aristotle. Its contrast is “esoteric.”
  • (OG) Exotericism — that is to say, the outward and popular formulation of religious and philosophic doctrines — reveils the truth; the self-assurance of ignorance, alas, always reviles the truth; whereas esotericism reveals the truth.
  • (TG) Extra-Cosmic. Outside of Kosmos or Nature; a nonsensical word invented to assert the existence of a personal God, independent of, or outside, Nature per se, in opposition to the Pantheistic idea that the whole Kosmos is animated or informed with the Spirit of Deity, Nature being but the garment, and matter the illusive shadow, of the real unseen Presence.
  • (KT) Extra-Cosmic, i.e., outside of Kosmos or Nature. A nonsensical word invented to assert the existence of a personal god independent of or outside Nature per se; for as Nature, or the Universe, is infinite and limitless there can be nothing outside it. The term is coined in opposition to the Pantheistic idea that the whole Kosmos is animated or informed with the Spirit of Deity, Nature being but the garment, and matter the illusive shadows, of the real unseen Presence.
  • (VS) Doctrine of the Eye (II 9) [[p. 27]] See No. 1. The exoteric Buddhism of the masses.
  • (TG) Eye of Horus. A very sacred symbol in ancient Egypt. It was called the outa : the right eye represented the sun, the left, the moon. Says Macrobius: “The outa (or uta ) is it not the emblem of the sun, king of the world, who from his elevated throne sees all the Universe below him?”
  • (TG) Eyes (divine). The “eyes” the Lord Buddha developed in him at the twentieth hour of his vigil when sitting under the Bo-tree, when he was attaining Buddhaship. They are the eyes of the glorified Spirit, to which matter is no longer a physical impediment, and which have the power of seeing all things within the space of the limitless Universe. On the following morning of that night, at the close of the third watch, the “Merciful One” attained the Supreme Knowledge.
  • (TG) Ezra {Hebr}. The Jewish priest and scribe, who, circa 450 B.C., compiled the Pentateuch (if indeed he was not the author of it) and the rest of the Old Testament, except Nehemiah and Malachi. [w.w.w.]
  • (TG) Ezra {Hebr}. The same as Azareel and Azriel, a great Hebrew Kabbalist. His full name is Rabbi Azariel ben Manahem. He flourished at Valladolid, Spain, in the twelfth century, and was famous as a philosopher and Kabbalist. He is the author of a work on the Ten Sephiroth.
  • (TG) F. — The sixth letter of the English alphabet, for which there is no equivalent in Hebrew. It is the double [[F and upside down backwards F]] of the Aeolians which became the Digamma for some mysterious reasons. It corresponds to the Greek phi . As a Latin numeral it denotes 40, with a dash over the letter ([[F with a horizontal line over it]]) 400,000.
  • (TG) Faces (Kabbalistic), or, as in Hebrew, Partzupheem . The word usually refers to Areekh Anpeen or Long Face, and Zeir-Anpeen, or Short Face, and Resha Hivrah the White Head or Face. The Kabbala states that from the moment of their appearance (the hour of differentiation of matter) all the material for future forms was contained in the three Heads which are one, and called Atteekah Kadosha (Holy Ancients and the Faces). It is when the Faces look toward each other, that the Holy Ancients in three Heads, or Atteekah Kadosha, are called Areek Appayem This refers to the three Higher Principles, cosmic and human.
  • (IN) Facies totius Universi . . . (Spinoza) The face of the whole universe, though it varies in infinite modes, yet remains always the same.
  • (TG) Fafnir {Nors}. The Dragon of Wisdom.
  • (TG) Fahian {Chin} . A Chinese traveller and writer in the early centuries of Christianity, who wrote on Buddhism.
  • (TG) Fa-Hwa-King {Chin} Chinese work on Cosmogony.
  • (TG) Faizi {arabic}. Literally the heart. A writer on occult and mystic subjects.
  • (TG) Fakir {arabic}. A Mussulman ascetic in India, a Mahometan Yogi. The name is often applied, though erroneously, to Hindu ascetics; for strictly speaking only Mussulman ascetics are entitled to it. This loose way of calling things by general names was adopted in Isis Unveiled but is now altered.
  • (IU) Fakirs. — Religious devotees in East India. They are generally attached to Brahmanical pagodas and follow the laws of Manu. A strictly religious fakir will go absolutely naked, with the exception of a small piece of linen called dhoti , around his loins. They wear their hair long, and it serves them as a pocket, as they stick in it various objects — such as a pipe, a small flute called vagudah, the sounds of which throw the serpents into a cataleptic torpor, and sometimes their bamboo-stick (about one foot long) with the seven mystical knots on it. This magical stick, or rather rod , the fakir receives from his guru on the day of his initiation, together with the three mantrams, which are communicated to him mouth to ear. No fakir will be seen without this powerful adjunct of his calling. It is, as they all claim, the divining rod, the cause of every occult phenomenon produced by them. [Philostratus assures us that the Brahmans were able, in his time, to perform the most wonderful cures by merely pronouncing certain magical words. The Indian Brahmans carry a staff and a ring, by means of which they are able to do almost anything. Origen states the same (Contra Celsum). But if a strong mesmeric fluid — say projected from the eye, and without any other contact-is not added, no magical words would be efficacious.] The Brahmanical fakir is entirely distinct from the Mussulman mendicant of India, also called fakirs in some parts of the British territory.
  • (FY) Fakir, a Mohamedan recluse or Yogi.
  • (WG) Fakir, a Mohammedan ascetic wonder-worker; the equivalent among the Mohammedans of the Hindu yogi.
  • (TG) Falk, Cain Chenul . A Kabbalistic Jew, reputed to have worked miracles. Kenneth Mackenzie quotes in regard to him from the German annalist Archenoiz’ work on England (1788): — There exists in London an extraordinary man who for thirty years has been celebrated in Kabbalistic records. He is named Cain Chenul Falk. A certain Count de Rautzow, lately dead in the service of France, with the rank of Field-Marshal, certifies that he has seen this Falk in Brunswick, and that evocations of spirits took place in the presence of credible witnesses. These spirits were Elementals, whom Falk brought into view by the conjurations used by every Kabbalist. His son, Johann Friedrich Falk, likewise a Jew, was also a Kabbalist of repute, and was once the head of a Kabbalistic college in London. His occupation was that of a jeweller and appraiser of diamonds, and he was a wealthy man. To this day the mystic writings and rare Kabbalistic works bequeathed by him to a trustee may be perused in a certain half-public library in London, by every genuine student of Occultism. Falk’s own writings are all still in MS., and some in cypher.
  • (FY) Fan, Bar-nang, space, eternal law.
  • (TG) Farbauti {Nors}. A giant in the Edda ; lit., the oarsman; the father of Loki, whose mother was the giantess Laufey (leafy isle); a genealogy which makes W.S.W. Anson remark in Asgard and the Gods that probably the oarsman or Farbauti was . . . . . the giant who saved himself from the flood in a heat, and the latter (Laufey) the island to which he rowed?” — which is an additional variation of the Deluge.
  • (TG) Fargard {avesta}. A section or chapter of verses in the Vendidad of the Parsis.
  • (TG) Farvarshi {avesta-mazdean} same as Ferouer, or the opposite (as contrasted) double. The spiritual counterpart of the still more spiritual original. Thus, Ahriman is the Ferouer or the Farvarshi of Ormuzd — demon est deus inversus — Satan of God. Michael the Archangel, he like god, is a Ferouer of that god. A Farvarshi is the shadowy or dark side of a Deity — or its darker lining.
  • (MO) Fenja {Nors} (fen-yah) [ fen water] One of the giantesses who turn the magic mill Grotte
  • (MO) Fenris, Fenrer {Nors} Loki’s son, werewolf which will devour the sun
  • (TG) Ferho {Gnos} . The highest and greatest creative power with the Nazarene Gnostics . (Codex Nazaraeus
  • (KT) Ferho {Gnos} . The highest and greatest creative power with the Nazarene Gnostics (Codex Nazaraeus).
  • (TG) Fetahil {Greek}. The lower creator, in the same Codex .
  • (MO) Fimbultyr {Nors} (fim-bul-teer) [ fimbul mighty, great + tyr god] The highest divinity, the god of secret wisdom
  • (TG) Fire (Living). A figure of speech to denote deity, the One life. A theurgic term, used later by the Rosicrucians. The symbol of the living fire is the sun, certain of whose rays develope the fire of life in a diseased body, impart the knowledge of the future to the sluggish mind, and stimulate to active function a certain psychic and generally dormant faculty in man. The meaning is very occult.
  • (TG) Fire-Philosophers . The name given to the Hermetists and Alchemists of the Middle Ages, and also to the Rosicrucians. The latter, the successors of the Theurgists, regarded fire as the symbol of Deity. It was the source, not only of material atoms, but the container of the spiritual and psychic Forces energizing them. Broadly analyzed, fire is a triple principle; esoterically, a septenary, as are all the rest of the Elements. As man is composed of Spirit, Soul and Body, plus a fourfold aspect: so is Fire. As in the works of Robert Fludd (de Fluctibus) one of the famous Rosicrucians, Fire contains (1) a visible flame (Body); (2) an invisible, astral fire (Soul); and (3) Spirit. The four aspects are heat (life), light (mind), electricity (Kamic, or molecular powers) and the Synthetic Essence, beyond Spirit, or the radical cause of its existence and manifestation. For the Hermetist or Rosicrucian, when a flame is extinct on the objective plane it has only passed from the seen world unto the unseen, from the knowable into the unknowable.
  • (KT) Fire-Philosophers. The name given to the Hermetists and Alchemists of the Middle Ages, and also to the Rosicrucians. The latter, the successors of Theurgists, regarded fire as the symbol of Deity. It was the source, not only of material atoms, but the container of the Spiritual and Psychic Forces energising them. Broadly analysed, Fire is a triple principle; esoterically, a septenary, as are all the rest of the elements. As man is composed of Spirit, Soul, and Body, plus a four-fold aspect; so is Fire. As in the works of Robert Flood (de Fluctibus), one of the famous Rosicrucians, fire contains — Firstly, a visible flame (body); secondly, an invisible, astral fire (soul); and thirdly, spirit. The four aspects are ( a ) heat (life), ( b ) light (mind), ( c ) electricity (Kamic or molecular powers, and ( d ) the synthetic essences, beyond spirit, or the radical cause of its existence and manifestation. For the Hermetist or Rosicrucian, when a flame is extinct on the objective plane, it has only passed from the seen world into the unseen; from the knowable into the unknowable.
  • (TG) Fifty Gates of Wisdom {Hebr}. The number is a blind, and there are really 49 gates, for Moses, than whom the Jewish world has no higher adept, reached, according to the Kabbalas, and passed only the the 49th. These gates typify the different planes of Being or Ens . ‘They are thus the gates of Life and the gates of understanding or degrees of occult knowledge. These 49 (or 50) gates correspond to the seven gates in the seven caves of Initiation into the Mysteries of Mithra (see Celsus and Kircher). The division of the 50 gates into five chief gates, each including ten — is again a blind. It is in the fourth gate of these five, from which begins, ending at the tenth, the world of Planets, thus making seven, corresponding to the seven lower Sephiroth — that the key to their meaning lies hidden. They are also called the gates of Binah or understanding.
  • (TG) First Point . Metaphysically the first point of manifestation, the germ of primeval differentiation, or the point in the infinite Circle whose centre is everywhere, and circumference nowhere. The Point is the LOGOS.
  • (MO) Fjolsvinn {Nors} (fyeul-svinn) [ fjol very + svinn wise] Odin as instructor and initiator given by Paracelsus to a particular kind of guardian angels or genii.
  • (WG) Flagae {Latin} , a name given by Paracelsus to one of the higher groups of Dhyan Chohans.
  • (TG) Flame (Holy). The Holy Flame is the name given by the Eastern Asiatic Kabbalists (Semites) to the Anima Mundi, the world soul. The Initiates were called the Sons of the Holy Flame.
  • (TG) Fludd (Robert), generally known as Robertus de Fluctibus, the chief of the Philosophers by Fire. A celebrated English Hermetist of the sixteenth century, and a voluminous writer. He wrote on the essence of gold and other mystic and occult subjects.
  • (TG) Fluvii Transitus {Latin}. Or crossing of the River (Chebar). Cornelius Agrippa gives this alphabet. In the Ars Quatuor Coronatorum, Vol. III., part 2, 1890, which work is the Report of the proceedings of the Quatuor Coronati Lodge of Freemasons, No. 2076, will be found copies of this alphabet, and also the curious old letters called Melachim, and the Celestial alphabet, supplied by W. Wynn Westcott, P.M. This Lodge seems to be the only one in England which really does study the hidden mysteries of Nature and Science in earnest.
  • (MO) Flyting [Eng. dial.] Dispute in verse, personal abuse
  • (TG) Fohat {Tibe}. A term used to represent the active (male) potency of the Sakti (female reproductive power) in nature. The essence of cosmic electricity. An occult Tibetan term for Daiviprakriti, primordial light: and in the universe of manifestation the ever-present electrical energy and ceaseless destructive and formative power. Esoterically, it is the same, Fohat being the universal propelling Vital Force, at once the propeller and the resultant.
  • (FY) Fohat, Tibetan for Sakti; cosmic force or energising power of the universe.
  • (WG) Fohat (Thibetan), force; force in its highest aspect, — that which gives differentiation and life to cosmic matter.
  • (OG) Fohat — An extremely mystical term used in the occultism of Tibet for what in Sanskrit is called daiviprakriti, which means divine nature or primordial nature, and which also can be called primordial light. In one sense of the word fohat may be considered as almost identical with the old mystical Greek eros, but fohat as a technical term contains within itself a far wider range of ideas than does the Greek term.
  • Fohat may be considered as the essence of kosmic electricity, provided, however, that in this definition we endow the term electricity with the attribute of consciousness; or, to put it more accurately, provided that we understand that the essence of electricity is indeed consciousness. It is ever-present and active from the primordial beginnings of a manvantara to its last end, nor does it then actually pass out of existence, but becomes quiescent or latent as it were, sleeping or dormant during the kosmic pralaya. In one sense of the word it may be called kosmic will, for the analogy with the conscious will in human beings is exceedingly close. It is the incessantly active, ever-moving, impelling or urging force in nature, from the beginning of the evolution of a universe or of a solar system to its end.
  • H. P. Blavatsky, quoting one of the ancient mystically occult works, says in substance: Fohat is the steed and thought is the rider. If, however, we liken fohat to what the conscious will is in the human being, we must then think only of the lower or substantial parts — the pranic activities — of the human will, for behind the substantial parts stands always the directing and guiding consciousness. Fohat being incessantly active is therefore both formative and destructive, because it is through the ceaseless working of fohat that unending change continues — the passing of one phase of manifested existence to another phase, whether this manifested existence be a solar system or a planetary chain or a globe or human being or, indeed, any entity.
  • Fohat is as active among the electrons of an atom and among the atoms themselves as it is among the suns. In one sense it may be called the vital force of the universe, corresponding from this viewpoint to the pranic activity on all the seven planes of the human constitution.
  • (SKv) Fohat ‘Cosmic Life or Vitality’; a mystical Tibetan term which is often used interchangeably with Daiviprakriti in some of its varying energies and functions. H. P. Blavatsky calls it the essence of cosmic electricity. Fohat has also been called Buddha-life because Fohat as the Cosmic Prana or life-principle, builds the Universe when inspired by the Cosmic Buddhi, or divine intelligence. Occult works say: Fohat is the steed and thought is the rider.
  • (MO) Fohat {Tibe} Electromagnetic radiation
  • (IN) Fohat (Turanian compound, fr Mongolian pho, fo, buddha, buddhi) The cause or essence of cosmic vitality or electricity, divine ideative energy of the universe.
  • (TG) Foh-tchou {Chin}. Lit. , Buddha’s Lord, meaning, however, simply the teacher of the doctrines of Buddha. Foh means a Guru who lives generally in a temple of Sakyamuni Buddha — the Foh-Maeyu.
  • (IN) Fons et origo {Latin} Source and origin.
  • (TG) Fons Vitae {Latin}. A work of Ibn Gebirol,the Arabian Jewish philosopher of the 11th century, who called it Me-gor Hayyun or the Fountain of Life” ( De Materia Universali and Fons Vitae ). The Western Kabbalists have proclaimed it a really Kabbalistic work. Several MSS., Latin and Hebrew, of this wonderful production have been discovered by scholars in public libraries; among others one by Munk, in 1802. The Latin name of Ibn Gebirol was Avicebron, a name well-known to all Oriental scholars.
  • (MO) Forsete {Nors} (for-set-eh) An Ase: justice, karma
  • (TG) Four Animals . The symbolical animals of the vision of Ezekiel (the Mercabah ). With the first Christians the celebration of the Mysteries of the Faith was accompanied by the burning of seven lights, with incense, the Trishagion, and the reading of the book of the gospels, upon which was wrought, both on covers and pages, the winged man, lion, bull, and eagle ( Qabbalah, by Isaac Myer, To this day these animals are represented along with the four Evangelists and prefixing their respective gospels in the editions of the Greek Church. Each represents one of the four lower classes of worlds or planes, into the similitude of which each personality is cast. Thus the Eagle (associated with St. John) represents cosmic Spirit or Ether, the all-piercing Eye of the Seer; the Bull of St. Luke, the waters of Life, the all-generating element and cosmic strength; the Lion of St. Mark, fierce energy, undaunted courage and cosmic fire; while the human Head or the Angel, which stands near St. Matthew is the synthesis of all three combined in the higher Intellect of man, and in cosmic Spirituality. All these symbols are Egyptian, Chaldean, and Indian. The Eagle, Bull and Lion-headed gods are plentiful, and all represented the same idea, whether in the Egyptian, Chaldean, Indian or Jewish religions, but beginning with the Astral body they went no higher than the cosmic Spirit or the Higher Manas — Atma-Buddhi, or Absolute Spirit and Spiritual Soul its vehicle, being incapable of being symbolised by concrete images.
  • (TG) Fravasham {avesta}. Absolute spirit.
  • (FY) Fravashem, absolute spirit.
  • (MO) Freke {Nors} (fray-keh) [gluttony] One of Odin’s wolfhounds
  • (MO) Frey {Nors} (fray) An Ase: planetary spirit of earth; valor
  • (TG) Freya or Frigga {Nors}. In the Edda, Frigga is the mother of the gods like Aditi in the Vedas . She is identical with the Northern Frea of the Germans, and in her lowest aspect was worshipped as the all-nourishing Mother Earth. She was seated on her golden throne, formed of webs of golden light, with three divine virgins as her handmaidens and messengers, and was occupied with spinning golden threads with which to reward good men. She is Isis and Diana at the same time, for she is also Holda, the mighty huntress, and she is Ceres-Demeter, who protects agriculture — the moon and nature.
  • (MO) Freya {Nors} (fray-a) An Asynja: planetary spirit of Venus, protectress of humanity
  • (MO) Frigga {Nors} [AS frigu love] An Asynja: Odin’s consort
  • (MO) Frode {Nors} (froo-deh) [ frodr wise] A legendary king
  • (MO) Frodefrid {Nors} (froo-deh-freed) [ frodr wise + frid peace] Age of peace and wisdom: the golden age
  • (TG) Frost Giants or Hrimthurses {Nors}. They are the great builders, the Cyclopes and Titans of the Norsemen, and play a prominent part in the Edda. It is they who build the strong wall round Asgard (the Scandinavian Olympus) to protect it from the Jotuns, the wicked giants.
  • (MO) Frost Giant {Nors} Age of non-life between active lives of a cosmos
  • (TG) Fylfot {Nors}. A weapon of Thor, like the Swastika, or the Jaina, the four-footed cross; generally called Thor’s Hammer.
  • (TG) G. — The seventh letter in the English alphabet. “In Greek, Chaldean, Syriac, Hebrew, Assyrian, Samaritan, Etrurian, Coptic, in the modern Romaic and Gothic, it occupies the third place in the alphabet, while in Cyrillic, Glagolitic, Croat, Russian, Serbian and Wallachian, it stands fourth.” As the name of “god” begins with this letter (in Syriac, gad; Swedish, gud; German, gott; English, god; Persian, gada there is an occult reason for this which only the students of esoteric philosophy and of the Secret Doctrine, explained esoterically, will understand thoroughly; it refers to the three logoi — the last, the Elohim, and the emanation of the latter, the androgynous Adam Kadmon. All these peoples have derived the name of “god” from their respective traditions, the more or less clear echoes of the esoteric tradition. Spoken and “Silent Speech” (writing) are a “gift of the gods”, say all the national traditions, from the old Aryan Sanskrit-speaking people who claim that their alphabet, the Devanagari ( lit., the language of the devas or gods) was given to them from heaven, down to the Jews, who speak of an alphabet, the parent of the one which has survived, as having been a celestial and mystical symbolism given by the angels to the patriarchs. Hence, every letter had its manifold meaning. A symbol itself of a celestial being and objects, it was in its turn represented on earth by like corresponding objects whose form symbolised the shape of the letter. The present letter, called in Hebrew gimel and symbolised by a long camel’s neck, or rather a serpent erect, is associated with the third sacred divine name, Ghadol or Magnus (great). Its numeral is four, the Tetragrammaton and the sacred Tetraktys; hence its sacredness. With other people it stood for 400 and with a dash over it, for 400,000.
  • (TG) Gabriel. According to the Gnostics, the “Spirit” or Christos, the “messenger of life”, and Gabriel are one. The former “is called sometimes the Angel Gabriel — in Hebrew ‘the mighty one of God’, “and took with the Gnostics the place of the Logos, while the Holy Spirit was considered one with the Aeon Life (see Irenaeus Therefore we find Theodoret saying (in Haeret. Fab ., “The heretics agree with us (Christians) respecting the beginning of all things. . . . but they say there is not one Christ (God), but one above and the other below . And this last formerly dwelt in many ; but the Jesus, they at one time say is from God, at another they call him a Spirit.” The key to this is given in the esoteric philosophy. The “spirit” with the Gnostics was a female potency esoterically, it was the ray proceeding front the Higher Manas, the Ego, and that which the Esotericists refer to as the Kama-Manas or the lower personal Ego, which is radiated in every human entity by the Higher Ego or Christos, the god within us. Therefore, they were right in saying: “there is but one Christ, but one above and the other below”. Every student of Occultism will understand this, and also that Gabriel — or “the mighty one of God” — is one with the Higher Ego (See Isis Unveiled
  • (TG) Gaea {Greek}. Primordial Matter in the Cosmogony of Hesiod; Earth, as some think; the wife of Ouranos, the sky or heavens. The female personage of the primeval Trinity, composed of Ouranos, Gaea and Eros.
  • (TG) Gaffarillus. An Alchemist and philosopher who lived in the middle of the seventeenth century. He is the first philosopher known to maintain that every natural object ( e.g ., plants, living creatures, etc, when burned, retained its form in its ashes and that it could be raised again from them. This claim was justified by the eminent chemist Du Chesne, and after him Kircher, Digby and Vallemont have assured themselves of the fact, by demonstrating that the astral forms of burned plants could be raised from their ashes. A receipt for raising such astral phantoms of flowers is given in a work of Oetinger, Thoughts on the Birth and Generation of Things .
  • (TG) Gaganeswara {Sans}. “Lord of the Sky”, a name of Garuda.
  • (MO) Gagnrad {Nors} (gang-n-rawd) [ gagn gainful + rad counsel] Odin in Vaftrudnismal
  • (TG) Gai-hinnom {Hebr}. The name of Hell in the Talmud.
  • (MO) Galder {Nors} (gahl-der) Incantation
  • (TG) Gambatrin {Nors}. The name of Hermodur’s “magic staff” in the Edda .
  • (TG) Ganadevas {Sans} . A certain class of celestial Beings who are said to inhabit Maharloka . They are the rulers of our Kalpa (Cycle) and therefore termed Kalpadhikarins, or Lord of the Kalpas. They last only “One Day” of Brahma.
  • (TG) Gandapada {Sans} . A celebrated Brahman teacher, the author of the Commentaries on the Sankhya Karika, Mandukya Upanishad, and other works.
  • (WG) Gandha, odor, smell; fragrant substance; fragrance; perfume.
  • (TG) Gandhara {Sans} . A musical note of great occult power in the Hindu gamut — the third of the diatonic scale.
  • (TG) Gandharva {Sans} . The celestial choristers and musicians of India. In the Vedas these deities reveal the secrets of heaven and earth and esoteric science to mortals. They had charge of the sacred Soma plant and its juice, the ambrosia drunk in the temple which gives “omniscience”.
  • (WG) Gandharvas, heavenly singers belonging to Indra’s court, a class of elemental spirits.
  • (GH) Gandharvas The musicians and singers of the gods, represented as dwelling in the sky and preparing the heavenly soma-juice for the gods, as they are especially skilled in medicine. In the Vedas they are described as revealing the secrets of heaven and divine truths to men. The Atharva-Veda mentions that there are 6,333 Gandharvas . “Cosmically — the Gandharvas are the aggregate powers of the solar-fire, and constitute its Forces; psychically — the intelligence residing in the Sushumna, Solar ray, the highest of the seven rays; mystically — the occult force in the Soma (the moon, or lunar plant) and the drink made of it; physically — the phenomenal, and spiritually — the noumenal causes of Sound and the ‘Voice of Nature.’ Hence, they are called the 6,333 ‘heavenly Singers’ and musicians of Indra’s loka who personify (even in number) the various and manifold sounds in Nature, both above and below.” ( Secret Doctrine, I, p. 523) ( Bhagavad-Gita, W. Q. Judge, p. 74)
  • (WG) Gandiva, the bow of Arjuna, which was made from the plant gandi . It was presented by Soma to Varuna, by him to Agni, and by Agni to Arjuna.
  • (GH) Gandiva (or Gandiva ) A remarkable bow which Arjuna received from the fire-god Agni in order that he might assist the deity in a battle with the god of the sky, Indra. At this time Arjuna also assisted Agni in the burning of the Khandava forest-an episode in the Mahabharata. The bow was originally given by Soma to the god Varuna, who in turn passed it on to Agni. It is likewise said to have belonged to Prajapati Brahma, and Siva. ( Bhagavad-Gita, W. Q. Judge, p. 6)
  • (TG) Gan-Eden {Hebr} . Also Ganduniyas. (See”Eden”
  • (TG) Ganesa {Sans} . The elephant-headed God of Wisdom, the son of Siva. He is the same as the Egyptian Thoth-Hermes. and Anubis or Hermanubis . The legend shows him as having lost his human head, which was replaced by that of an elephant.
  • (WG) Ganesa, the god of wisdom, who is said to cause obstacles and remove them. He is the son of Siva and Parvati, and is represented as a short fat man with an elephant’s head, having but one tusk; usually he is riding a rat, or is attended by one. He is said to have written down the Mahabharata, as dictated by Vyasa. He is the allegorical representation of magical learning. ( gana , body of attendants, Siva’s troop; isa, commander: leader of the attendants of Siva
  • (TG) Ganga {Sans} . The Ganges, the principal sacred river in India. There are two versions of its myth: one relates that Ganga (the goddess) having transformed herself into a river, Rolls from the big toe of Vishnu: the other, that the Ganga drops from the ear of Siva into the Anavatapta lake, thence passes out, through the mouth of the silver cow (gomukhi), crosses all Eastern India and falls into the Southern Ocean. “An heretical superstition”, remarks Mr. Eitel in his Sanskrit, Chinese Dictionary “ascribes to the waters of the Ganges ” sin-cleansing power “. No more a “superstition” one would say, than the belief that the waters of Baptism and the Jordan have “sin-cleansing power”.
  • (GH) Ganges (Ganga) The sacred river of India, represented in the Puranas as taking its rise in the heavens from the toe of Vishnu, and brought down to earth through the prayers of the sage Bhagiratha, in order to purify the ashes of the sixty thousand sons of king Sagara. (These sons had been destroyed by the angry glance of the sage Kapila Ganga intended to flood the earth (because of being obliged to descend from her heavenly abode), but the force of the fall was intercepted by the god Siva, who caught the river in his matted locks, and allowed it to descend from his brow in seven gentle streams upon the earth. Ganga is personified as a goddess, the daughter of Mena and Himavat (the personification of the Himalaya mountains). The goddess became the wife of king Santanu and gave birth to Bhishma. ( Bhagavad-Gita, W. Q. Judge, p. 75)
  • (TG) Gangadwara {Sans} . “The gate or door of the Ganges”, literally; the name of a town now called Hardwar, at the foot of the Himalayas.
  • (TG) Gangi {Sans} . A renowned Sorcerer in the time of Kasyapa Buddha (a predecessor of Gautama). Gangi was regarded as an incarnation of Apalala, the Naga (Serpent), the guardian Spirit of the Sources of Suhhavastu, a river in Udyana. Apalala is said to have been converted by Gautama Buddha, to the good Law, and become an Arhat. The allegory of the name is comprehensible: all the Adepts and initiates were called nagas, “Serpents of Wisdom”.
  • (MO) Ganglare {Nors} (gong-lay-re) [ gang wandering + lare learner] King Gylfe seeking wisdom
  • (TG) Ganinnanse. A Singhalese priest who has not yet been ordained — from gana, an assemblage or brotherhood. The higher ordained priests “are called terunnanse from the Pali thero, an elder”. (Hardy)
  • (WG) Garima, a siddhi, or power in magic, giving control over gravitation, so that one can become light or heavy at will.
  • (MO) Garin {Nors} The hound that guards the gate of Hel, queen of death
  • (TG) Garm {Nors}. The Cerberus of the Edda . This monstrous dog lived in the Gnypa cavern in front of the dwelling of Hel, the goddess of the nether-world.
  • (TG) Garuda {Sans} . A gigantic bird in the Ramayana, the steed of Vishnu. Esoterically — the symbol of the great Cycle.
  • (WG) Garuda, a mythical bird pictured as attendant upon Vishnu, as the eagle is the bird of Jove. It is a symbol of the great cycle of cosmic activity.
  • (GH) Garuda The bearer of Vishnu (hence often called Vishnu-ratha): represented as having the body and limbs of a man but the head, wings, talons, and beak of an eagle; the face being white, the wings red, and the body golden. Garuda is regarded as the king of the birds and the great enemy of serpents: his parents were the Vedic sage Kasyapa and Vinata — one of the daughters of Daksha (one of the Prajapatis). The myths also relate that Garuda once took the Amrita from the gods in order to purchase the freedom of his mother from Kadru. Indra pursued Garuda and recovered the Amrita — although the god of the sky was worsted in the battle for it. Garuda is “the symbol esoterically of the great cycle,” ( Secret Doctrine, II, p. 323), while his son, Jatayu “is, of course, the cycle of 60,000 years within the great cycle of GARUDA; hence he is represented as his son, or nephew,” ( Secret Doctrine, II, p. 570). ( Bhagavad-Gita, W. Q. Judge, p. 75)
  • (TG) Gatha {Sans}. Metrical chants or hymns, consisting of moral aphorisms. A gatha of thirty-two words is called Aryagiti.
  • (WG) Gatha, a sacred verse, to be chanted or sung; a religious verse, but not belonging to the Vedas.
  • (TG) Gati {Sans} . The six (esoterically seven ) conditions of sentient existence. These are divided into two groups: the three higher and the three lower paths . To the former belong the devas, the asuras and ( immortal ) men; to the latter (in esoteric teachings) creatures in hell, pretas or hungry demons, and animals. Explained esoterically, however, the last three are the personalities in Kamaloka, elementals and animals. The seventh mode of existence is that of the Nirmanakaya .
  • (TG) Gatra {Sans} . Lit., the limbs (of Brahma) from which the “mind-born” sons, the seven Kumaras, were born.
  • (FY) Gaudapada, a celebrated Brahmanical teacher, the author of commentaries on the Sankhya Karika, Mundukya Upanishad,
  • (TG) Gautama {Sans} . The Prince of Kapilavastu, son of Sudhodana, the Sakya king of a small realm on the borders of Nepaul, born in the seventh century B.C., now called the “Saviour of the World”. Gautama or Gotama was the sacerdotal name of the Sakya family, and Sidhartha was Buddha’s name before he became a Buddha. Sakyamuni, means the Saint of the Sakya family, born a simple mortal he rose to Buddhaship through his own personal and unaided merit. A man — verily greater than any god!
  • (KT) Gautama {Sans} A name in India. It is that of the Prince of Kapilavastu, son of Sudhodana, the Sakhya King of a small territory on the borders of Nepaul, born in the seventh century B.C., now called the “Saviour of the world.” Gautama or Gotama was the sacerdotal name of the Sakya family. Born a simple mortal, he rose to Buddha-ship through his own personal and unaided merit; a man — verily greater than any God!
  • (SP) Gautama — the family name of Sakyamuni Buddha, Pali Gotama.
  • (TG) Gayat {Sans} . Ancient city of Magadha, a little north-west of the modern Gayah. It is at the former that Sakyamuni reached his Buddhaship, under the famous Bodhi-tree, Bodhidruma .
  • GAYATRI
  • As rendered by G. de Purucker:
  • Oh thou golden sun of most excellent splendor, illumine our hearts and fill our minds, so that we, recognizing our oneness with the Divinity which is the heart of the universe, may see the pathway before our feet, and tread it to those distant goals of perfection, stimulated by thine own radiant light.
  • (TG) Gayatri {Sans} . also Savriti . A most sacred verse, addressed to the Sun, in the Rig-Veda, which the Brahmans have to repeat mentally every morn and eve during their devotions.
  • (FY) Gayatri, the holiest verse of the Vedas.
  • (OG) Gayatri or Savitri — {Sans} A verse of the Rig-Veda (iii.62.10) which from immemorial time in India has been surrounded with the attributes of quasi-divinity. The Sanskrit words of this verse are: Tat savitur varenyam bhargo devasya dhimahi, dhiyo yo nah prachodayat . Every orthodox Brahmana is supposed to repeat this archaic hymn, at least mentally, at both his morning and evening religious exercises or devotions. A translation in explanatory paraphrase, giving the essential esoteric meaning of the Gayatri or Savitri, is the following: “Oh thou golden sun of most excellent splendor, illumine our hearts and fill our minds, so that we, recognizing our oneness with the Divinity which is the heart of the universe, may see the pathway before our feet, and tread it to those distant goals of perfection, stimulated by thine own radiant light.”
  • (GH) Gayatri An ancient meter of 24 syllables (variously arranged, but generally as a triplet of 8 syllables each). The word is also applied specifically to a verse in the Rig-Veda, iii, p. 62, 10: tat savitur varen am bhargo devasya dhimahi dhiyo yo nah prachodayat.
  • Literal translation: “Let us meditate on that excellent splendor of the divine Sun; may it illumine our hearts (minds).” ( Bhagavad-Gita, W. Q. Judge, p. 76)
  • (SKf) Gayatri, Savitri The Gayatri is a verse or metrical hymn of the Rig-Veda (iii, 62, 10) which has been held very sacred from time immemorial, for it contains the essence of religion, of divine living. The word Gayatri is derived from the verb-root gai — to sing or to praise in song. This Gayatri, which is a verse invoking the Divine Sun at the depths of our being, has also been called the Savitri, because Savitri is the name given to the Divine Solar Entity, or that divine influence and inspiring and vivifying power behind Surya, the visible sun. Savitri is derived from the verb-root su — to vivify, to urge.
  • The Sanskrit words and literal translation of this verse are: 1 2 3 — 6 1 Tat savitur varenyam — Let us meditate on that most 4 5 6 — 3 4 5 2 bhargo devasya dhimahi — excellent light of the divine Sun, 8 7 9 10 — 7 10 9 8 dhiyo yo nah prachodayat. — that it may illumine our minds. A translation by G. de Purucker in explanatory paraphrase giving the essential esoteric meaning of the above is the following: “O thou golden sun of most excellent splendor, Illumine our hearts and fill our minds, so that we, Recognising our oneness with the Divinity, which is the heart of the Universe, May see the Pathway before our feet, and tread it to those distant goals of perfection, Stimulated by thine own radiant light.”
  • (SP) Gayatri or Savitri — a verse ( Rgveda III.62.10) recited daily by orthodox Brahmanas at morning and evening: tat savitur varenyam bhargo devasya dhimahi dhiyo yo nah pracodayat
  • — approximately translated: “Let us meditate on that most excellent light of the divine Sun, that it may illumine our minds.”
  • (TG) Geber {Hebr} or Gibborim . “Mighty men”; the same as the Kabirim . In heaven, they are regarded as powerful angels, on earth as the giants mentioned in chapter vi. of Genesis .
  • (TG) Gebirol, Salomon Ben Jehudah . Called in literature Avicebron. An Israelite by birth, a philosopher, poet and Kabbalist, a voluminous writer and a mystic. He was born in the eleventh century at Malaga (1021), educated at Saragrossa, and died at Valencia in 1070, murdered by a Mohammedan. His fellow-religionists called him Salomon the Sephardi, or the Spaniard, and the Arabs, Abu Ayyub Suleiman ben ya’hya Ibn Dgebirol, whilst the scholastics named him Avicebron. (See Myer’s Qabbalah Ibn Gebirol was certainly one of the greatest philosophers and scholars of his age. He wrote much in Arabic and most of his MSS. have been preserved. His greatest work appears to be the Megor Hayyim, i.e ., the Fountain of Life, “one of the earliest exposures of the secrets of the Speculative Kabbalah”, as his biographer informs us.
  • (KT) Gebirol. Salomon Ben Jehudah, called in literature Avicebron. An Israelite by birth, a philosopher, poet and kabalist; a voluminous writer and a mystic. He was born in the eleventh century at Malaga (1021), educated at Saragossa, and died at Valencia in 1070, murdered by a Mahomedan. His fellow-religionists called him Salomon, the Sephardi, or the Spaniard, and the Arabs, Abu Ayyub Suleiman-ben ya’hya Ibn Dgebirol, whilst the Scholastics named him Avicebron (see Myers’ Qabbalah). Ibn Gebirol was certainly one of the greatest philosophers and scholars of his age. He wrote much in Arabic, and most of his MSS have been preserved. His greatest work appears to be The Megoy Hayyim, i. e ., The Fountain of Life, “one of the earliest exposures of the secrets of the Speculative Kabbalah,” as his biographer informs us.
  • (TG) Geburah {Hebr} . A Kabbalistic term ; the fifth Sephira, a female and passive potency, meaning severity and power; from it is named the Pill:~r of Severity.
  • (WG) Geburah {Hebr}, power. The fifth of the ten Sephiroth of the Kabalah. A female potency.
  • (TG) Gedulah {Hebr} . Another name for the Sephira Chesed .
  • (WG) Gedulah {Hebr}, same as Chesed .
  • (TG) Gehenna, in Hebrew Hinnom . No hell at all, but a valley near Jerusalem, where Israelites immolated their children to Moloch. In that valley a place named Tophet was situated, where a fire was perpetually preserved for sanitary purposes. The prophet Jeremiah informs us that his countrymen, the Jews, used to sacrifice their children on that spot.
  • (TG) Gehs {avesta}. Parsi prayers.
  • (MO) Geirrod {Nors} (gay-reud) [ geir spear + rod red] An early humanity
  • (TG) Gelukpa {Tibe}. “Yellow Caps” literally; the highest and most orthodox Buddhist sect in Tibet, the antithesis of the Dugpa (“Red Caps”), the old “devil worshippers”.
  • (FY) Gelugpas, “Yellow Caps,” the true Magi and their school, so called in Tibet.
  • (WG) Gelukpa, the same as Gyalugpa. Literally, the “yellow caps”, from their wearing such color. They are a sect in Tibet, the opposite of Dugpas who wear red caps. Gelukpas are white magicians and Dugpas black.
  • (TG) Gemara {Hebr} . The latter portion of the Jewish Talmud, begun by Rabbi Ashi and completed by Rabbis Mar and Meremar, about 300 A.D. [w.w.w.]
  • (TG) Lit., to finish. It is a commentary on the Mishna.
  • (TG) Gematria {Hebr} . A division of the practical Kabbalah. It shows the numerical value of Hebrew words by summing up the values of the letters composing them; and further, it shows by this means, analogies between words and phrases.
  • One of the methods (arithmetical) for extracting the hidden meaning from letters, words and sentences.
  • (TG) Gems, Three precious . In Southern Buddhism these are the sacred books, the Buddhas and the priesthood. In Northern Buddhism and its secret schools, the Buddha, his sacred teachings, and the Narjols (Buddhas of Compassion).
  • (TG) Genesis. The whole of the Book of Genesis down to the death of Joseph, is found to be a hardly altered version of the Cosmogony, of the Chaldeans, as is now repeatedly proven from the Assyrian tiles. The first three chapters are transcribed from the allegorical narratives of the beginnings common to all nations. Chapters four and five are a new allegorical adaptation of the same narration in the secret Book of Numbers: chapter six is an astronomical narrative of the Solar year and the seven cosmocratores from the Egyptian original of the Pymander and the symbolical visions of a series of Enoichioi (Seers) — from whom came also the Book of Enoch. The beginning of Exodus, and the story of Moses is that of the Babylonian Sargon, who having flourished (as even that unwilling authority Dr. Sayce tells us) 3750 B.C. preceded the Jewish lawgiver by almost 2300 years. (See Secret Doctrine, vol. II., pp. 691 et seq Nevertheless, Genesis is an undeniably esoteric work. It has not borrowed, nor has it disfigured the universal symbols and teachings on the lines of which it was written, but simply adapted the eternal truths to its own national spirit and clothed them in cunning allegories comprehensible only to its Kabbalists and Initiates. The Gnostics have done the same, each sect in its own way, as thousands of years before, India, Egypt, Chaldea and Greece, had also stressed the same incommunicable truths each in its own national garb. The key and solution to all such narratives can be found only in the esoteric teachings .
  • (TG) Genii {Latin}. A name for Aeons, or angels, with the Gnostics. The names of their hierarchies and classes are simply legion.
  • (TG) Geonic Period . The era of the Geonim may be found mentioned in works treating of the Kabbalah; the ninth century A.D. is implied.
  • (MO) Gerd {Nors} A giantess: spouse of Frey
  • (MO) Gere {Nors} [greed] One of Odin’s wolfhounds
  • (TG) Gharma {Sans} . A title of Karttikeya, the Indian god of war and the Kumara born of Siva’s drop of sweat that fell into the Ganges.
  • (WG) Ghee, a common word for ghi or ghrita — clarified butter used both for culinary and religious purposes.
  • (TG) Ghocha {Sans} . Lit., “the miraculous Voice”. The name of a great Arhat, the author of Abhidharmamrita Shastra, who restored sight to a blind man by anointing his eyes with the tears of the audience moved by his (Ghocha’s) supernatural eloquence.
  • (WG) Ghora, frightful, disagreeable; an epithet of Siva.
  • (WG) Ghrana, the nose; smell; smelling.
  • (WG) Ghrita, ghee, butter clarified and hardened.
  • (MO) Giant, Giantess {Nors} Matter vivified by divinity
  • (TG) Gilgoolem {Hebr} . The cycle of rebirths with the Hebrew Kabbalists; with the orthodox Kabbalists, the “whirling of the soul” after death, which finds no rest until it reaches Palestine, the “promised land”, and its body is buried there.
  • (TG) Gimil {Nors}. “The Cave of Gimil” or Wingolf. A kind of Heaven or Paradise, or perhaps a New Jerusalem, built by the “Strong and Mighty God” who remains nameless in the Edda, above the Field of Ida, and after the new earth rose out of the waters.
  • (MO) Gimle {Nors} (gim-leh) [heavenly abode] A superior shelf of existence
  • (TG) Ginnungagap {Nors}. The “cup of illusion” literally; the abyss of the great deep,or the shoreless, beginningless, and endless, yawning gulf; which in esoteric parlance we call the “World’s Matrix”, the primordial living space. The cup that contains the universe, hence the “cup of illusion”.
  • (MO) Ginnungagap {Nors} (yinn-ung-a-gahp) [ ginn the void + unge off spring + gap chasm] The mystery of Nonbeing
  • (TG) Giol {Nors}. The Styx, the river Giol which had to be crossed before the nether-world was reached, or the cold Kingdom of Hel. It was spanned by a gold-covered bridge, which led to the gigantic iron fence that encircles the palace of the Goddess of the Under-World or Hel.
  • (MO) Gladsheim {Nors} (glahds-haym) [gladhome] Location of Valhalla
  • (OG) Globe — Every one of the physical globes that we see scattered over the fields of space is accompanied by six — really eleven — invisible and superior globes, forming what in theosophy is called a chain. This is the case with every sun or star, with every planet, and with every moon of every planet. It is likewise the case with the nebulae and the comets: all are septiform entities in manifestation; all have a sevenfold — indeed twelvefold — constitution, even as man has, who is a copy in the little of what the universe is in the great. The seven manifested globes for purposes of convenience are enumerated as A, B, C, D, E, F, and G; but reference is sometimes made more mystically to the globes from “A to Z,” here hinting at but not specifying all the twelve globes of the chain.
  • The life-waves circle around these globes in seven great cycles which are called rounds. Each life-wave first enters globe A, runs through its life cycle there, and then passes on to globe B. Finishing its cycle on globe B, it passes on to globe C, and then to globe D, the lowest of the manifested seven. In our own planetary chain, globe D is our earth. Three globes precede it on the downward arc, and three globes follow it on the ascending arc of evolution — referring here to the manifested seven.
  • The passing through or traversing of any one of these seven globes by the life-wave is a globe round; and during any one globe round on a globe, seven root-races are born, attain their efflorescence, and then pass away. ( See also Round)
  • (TG) Gna {Nors}. One of the three handmaidens of the goddess Freya. She is a female Mercury who bears her mistress messages into all parts of the world.
  • (TG) Gnana {Sans} . Knowledge as applied to the esoteric sciences.
  • (WG) Gnana . (See Jnana
  • (TG) Gnan Devas {Sans} . Lit., “the gods of knowledge”. The higher classes of gods or devas ; the “mind-born” sons of Brahma, and others including the Manasa-putras (the Sons of Intellect). Esoterically, our reincarnating Egos .
  • (TG) Gnanasakti {Sans} . The power of true knowledge, one of the seven great forces in nature ( six, exoterically).
  • (FY) Gnansakti, the power of true knowledge, one of the six forces.
  • (WG) Gnani . (See Jnanin
  • (TG) Gnatha {Sans} . The Kosmic Ego ; the conscious, intelligent Soul of Kosmos.
  • (TG) Gnomes The Rosicrucian name for the mineral and earth elementals.
  • (TG) Gnosis {Greek}. Lit., “knowledge”. The technical term used by the schools of religious philosophy, both before and during the first centuries of so-called Christianity, to denote the object of their enquiry. This Spiritual and Sacred Knowledge, the Gupta Vidya of the Hindus, could only be obtained by Initiation into Spiritual Mysteries of which the ceremonial “Mysteries” were a type.
  • (KT) Gnosis ( Gr. ) Lit. “knowledge.” The technical term used by the schools of religious philosophy, both before and during the first centuries of so-called Christianity, to denote the object of their enquiry. This spiritual and sacred knowledge, the Gupta Vidya of the Hindus, could only be obtained by Initiation into Spiritual Mysteries of which the ceremonial “Mysteries” were a type.
  • (WG) Gnosis, “knowledge”. The term used in the earlier Western mystical systems to denote the final wisdom to be achieved. The same as the Gupta Vidya of the Hindus.
  • (TG) Gnostics {Greek}. The philosophers who formulated and taught the Gnosis or Knowledge . They flourished in the first three centuries of the Christian era: the following were eminent, Valentinus, Basilides, Marcion, Simon Magus, etc. [w.w.w.]
  • (KT) Gnostics {Greek} The philosophers who formulated and taught the “Gnosis” or knowledge. They flourished in the first three centuries of the Christian Era. The following were eminent: Valentinus, Basilides, Marcion, Simon Magus, etc.
  • (WG) Gnostics, philosophers of the first, second, and third century who followed the Gnosis (knowledge) and taught a doctrine almost identical with present-day Theosophy.
  • (VS) Gnyana [[p. 47]] Knowledge, Wisdom.
  • (WG) Gnyana . (See Jnyana
  • (TG) Gnypa {Nors}. The cavern watched by the dog Garm .
  • (VS) thy inner GOD [[p. 9]] The Higher SELF.
  • (OG) God — The core of the core of a human being or of any other organic entity whatsoever is a kosmic spirit, a spark so to say of the kosmic flame of life. ( See also Inner God)
  • (OG) Gods — The old pantheons were builded upon an ancient and esoteric wisdom which taught, under the guise of a public mythology, profound secrets of the structure and operations of the universe which surrounds us. The entire human race has believed in gods, has believed in beings superior to men; the ancients all said that men are the “children” of these gods, and that from these superior beings, existent in the azure spaces, men draw all that in them is; and, furthermore, that men themselves, as children of the gods, are in their inmost essence divine beings linked forever with the boundless universe of which each human being, just as is the case with every other entity everywhere, is an inseparable part. This is a truly sublime conception.
  • One should not think of human forms when the theosophist speaks of the gods; we mean the arupa — the “formless” — entities, beings of pure intelligence and understanding, relatively pure essences, relatively pure spirits, formless as we physical humans conceive form. The gods are the higher inhabitants of nature. They are intrinsic portions of nature itself, for they are its informing principles. They are as much subject to the wills and energies of still higher beings — call these wills and energies the “laws” of higher beings, if you will — as we are, and as are the kingdoms of nature below us.
  • The ancients put realities, living beings, in the place of laws which, as Occidentals use the term, are only abstractions — an expression for the action of entities in nature ; the ancients did not cheat themselves so easily with words. They called them gods, spiritual entities. Not one single great thinker of the ancients, until the Christian era, ever talked about laws of nature, as if these laws were living entities, as if these abstractions were actual entities which did things. Did the laws of navigation ever navigate a ship? Does the law of gravity pull the planets together? Does it unite or pull the atoms together? This word laws is simply a mental abstraction signifying unerring action of conscious and semi-conscious energies in nature.
  • (TG) Gogard {avesta}. The Tree of Life in the Avesta .
  • (TG) Golden Age. The ancients divided the life cycle into the Golden, Silver, Bronze and Iron Ages. The Golden was an age of primeval purity, simplicity and general happiness.
  • (KT) Golden Age. The ancients divided the life cycle into the Golden, Silver, Bronze and Iron Ages. The Golden was an age of primeval purity, simplicity and general happiness.
  • GOLDEN CHAIN
  • The GOLDEN RULE
  • Excerpt from James A. Long’s Expanding Horizons :
  • American Indian Great Spirit, grant that I may not criticize my neighbor until I have walked a mile in his moccasins.
  • Buddhism In five ways should a clansman minister to his friends and familiars – by generosity, courtesy, benevolence, by treating them as he treats himself, and by being as good as his word.
  • Christianity All things whatsoever ye would that men should do to you, do ye even so to them: for this is the law and the prophets.
  • Confucianism “Is there any one word,” asked Tzu Kung, “which could be adopted as a lifelong rule of conduct?” The Master replied: “Is not Sympathy the word? Do not do to others what you would not like yourself.”
  • Greek Philosophy Do not do to others what you would not wish to suffer yourself. — Isocrates Treat your friends as you would want them to treat you. — Aristotle
  • Hinduism One should not behave towards others in a way which is disagreeable to oneself. This is the essence of duty (dharma). All else results from selfish desire.
  • Islam No one of you is a believer until he loves for his brother what he loves for himself.
  • Judaism Thou shalt not hate thy brother in thine heart:…but thou shalt love thy neighbor as thyself.
  • Zoroastrianism That nature only is good when it shall not do unto another whatever is not good for its own self.
  • (TG) Gonpa {Tibe}. A temple or monastery; a Lamasery .
  • (TG) Gopis {Sans} . Shepherdesses — the playmates and companions of Krishna, among whom was his wife Raddha.
  • (TG) Gossain {Sans} . The name of a certain class of ascetics in India.
  • (SKv) Gotrabhujnana, Jnanadarsanasuddhi Gotra-bhu-jnana means ‘knowledge concerning the races of the earth’ or ‘knowledge of humankind’; a compound of gotra — race, bhu -earth, and jnana — knowledge. Jnana-darsana-suddhi means ‘perfection in visioning Wisdom or Truth’; a compound of jnana — wisdom, darsana, a participial form of verb-root dris — to perceive, and suddhi — purity or perfection. All the ancient Gurus, Acharyas, and Naljor, were versed in Secret Wisdom of this kind.
  • (WG) Govinda, the finder of cows, the searcher for cows, an epithet of Krishna or manifested Vishnu.
  • (GH) Govinda A name applied to Krishna. It refers to the time of his youth, for he was reared amongst the cowherds. (Meaning of the word itself: chief of cowherds: go, a cow. Bhagavad-Gita, W. Q. Judge, p. 11)
  • (TG) Great Age . There were several “great ages” mentioned by the ancients. In India it embraced the whole Maha-manvantara, the “age of Brahma”, each “Day” of which represents the life cycle of a chain — i.e . it embraces a period of seven Rounds. (See Esoteric Buddhism, by A. P. Sinnett Thus while a “Day” and a “Night” represent, as Manvantara and Pralaya, 8,640,000,000 years, an “age” lasts through a period of 311,040,000,000,000 years; after which the Pralaya, or dissolution of the universe, becomes universal. With the Egyptians and Greeks the “great age” referred only to the tropical or sidereal year, the duration of which is 25,668 solar years. Of the complete age — that of the gods — they say nothing, as it was a matter to be discussed and divulged only in the Mysteries, during the initiating ceremonies. The “great age” of the Chaldees was the same in figures as that of the Hindus.
  • (KT) Great Age. There were several “Great Ages” mentioned by the ancients. In India it embraced the whole Maha-Manvantara, the “Age of Brahma,” each “Day” of which represents the Life Cycle of a chain, i. e., it embraces a period of Seven Rounds ( vide “Esoteric Buddhism,” by A. P. Sinnett). Thus while a “Day” and a “Night” represent, as Manvantara and Pralaya, 8,640,000,000 years, an “age” lasts through a period of 311,040,000,000,000; after which the Pralaya or dissolution of the universe becomes universal. With the Egyptian and Greeks the “Great Age” referred only to the Tropical, or Sidereal year, the duration of which is 25,868 solar years. Of the complete age — that of the Gods — they said nothing, as it was a matter to be discussed and divulged only at the Mysteries, and during the Initiation Ceremonies. The “Great Age” of the Chaldees was the same in figures as that of the Hindus.
  • (TG) Grihastha {Sans} Lit., “a householder”, “one who lives in a house with his family”. A Brahman “family priest” in popular rendering, and the sacerdotal hierarchy of the Hindus.
  • (WG) Grihastha, a priest of the exoteric ritual only; a house holder. ( grihia, house sthia, standing, abiding
  • (MO) Grimner {Nors} [disguised] Odin as teacher of the younger Agnar
  • (MO) Groa {Nors} (groo-a) [growth] A sibyl: the evolutionary past leading up to the present
  • (MO) Grotte {Nors} (grott-eh) [growth] Magic mill of change, creation, destruction: evolution
  • (PV) Guacamayo Spanish, “macaw.” Six macaws, with the game ball, compose the symbol of the god-Seven (Cabahuil), the disguise or nahual of the Solar deity.
  • (PV) Guaman Poma de Ayala, Felipe . “Falcon Puma.” An Andean Indian nobleman of the Inca caste, the author of the Nueva Coronica y Buen Gobierno, an illustrated codex or manuscript describing the origins of the Incas, the four ages of mankind, and related matters from indigenous Andean pre-Conquest belief. The manuscript severely indicts Spanish treatment of the native Andean peoples. Prepared sometime between 1567 and 1615, it was directed to King Philip III of Spain, but somehow found its way to the Royal Library in Copenhagen, where it lay untouched for 300 years, until 1908, when European scholars interested in the early New World brought it to light.
  • (PV) Gucumatz {quiche-maya} “Serpent-bird” or “Feathered Serpent.” One of six hypostases of Cabahuil, it is especially associated with Cabahuil itself and another hypostasis, Tepeu, as the three suns of the line of parallel (rising, at zenith, setting). Corresponds to the sun at setting. Identical with the Quetzalcoatl of Toltec tradition. Stands also for the class of creative gods as a whole.
  • (MO) Gudasaga {Nors} (goo-dah-sah-ga) [ gud god + saga spell] A divine tale given orally, a god-spell or gospel
  • (TG) Guardian Wall . A suggestive name given to the host of translated adepts (Narjols) or the Saints collectively, who are supposed to watch over, help and protect Humanity. This is the so-called “Nirmanakaya” doctrine in Northern mystic Buddhism. (See Voice of the Silence
  • (VS) Guardian Wall (III 28) [[p. 68]] The “Guardian Wall” or the “Wall of Protection.” It is taught that the accumulated efforts of long generations of Yogis, Saints and Adepts, especially of the Nirmanakayas have created, so to say, a wall of protection around mankind, which wall shields mankind invisibly from still worse evils.
  • (WG) Guardian Wall, the metaphorical wall of protection created around mankind by the accumulated efforts of all the hosts of Saints, Adepts, Narjols, and Nirmanakayas, to save it from falling lower in the scale than it already is, and to shield it from yet more terrible evils than are at present its lot.
  • (GH) Gudakesa One of the names given to Arjuna. ( Meaning of the word itself: thick-haired. Bhagavad-Gita, W. Q. Judge, p. 79)
  • (TG) Guff {Hebr} . Body; physical form; also written Gof.
  • (WG) Guha, a cave or subterranean resort of a yogi.
  • (TG) Guhya {Sans} . Concealed, secret.
  • (TG) Guhya Vidya {Sans} . The secret knowledge of mystic Mantras.
  • (KT) Guhya Vidya {Sans} The secret knowledge of mystic-mantras.
  • (SKs) Guhya-Vidya The knowledge of Mantras or mystical incantation, the science of the mystical potency of the sounds or letters of a chant. Guhya-Vidya is a compound of vidya — wisdom, and guhya — hidden, derived from the verb-root guh — to hide, to protect.
  • (FY) Gujarathi, the vernacular dialect of Gujrat, a province of Western India.
  • (TG) Gullweig {Nors}. The personification of the “golden” ore. It is said in the Edda that during the Golden Age, when lust for gold and wealth was yet unknown to man, “when the gods played with golden disks, and no passion disturbed the rapture of mere existence”, the whole earth was happy. But, no sooner does “Gullweig (Gold ore) the bewitching enchantress come, who, thrice cast into the fire, arises each time more beautiful than before, and fills the souls of gods and men with unappeasable longing”, than all became changed. It is then that the Norns, the Past, Present and Future, entered into being, the blessed peace of childhood’s dreams passed away and Sin came into existence with all its evil consequences. (Asgard and the Gods
  • (MO) Gullveig {Nors} (gull-vayg) [ guld gold + veig drink or thirst] The soul’s yearning for wisdom
  • (TG) Gunas {Sans} . Qualities, attributes (See “Triguna”); a thread, also a cord.
  • (FY) Gunas, qualities, properties.
  • (WG) Guna, a quality, attribute; as a term in philosophy, one o the three pervading qualities of prakriti, matter, which specifically are: sattva, truth, purity; rajas, passional activity; tamas, darkness. ( guna, a single thread of a cord
  • (OG) Gunas or Trigunas — {Sans} Differentiated matter is considered to possess or to have in occult philosophy three essential qualities or characteristics inherent in it, and their Sanskrit names are satva, rajas, and tamas. These three are the gunas or trigunas.
  • (SK)o Guna, Triguna, Sattva, Rajas, Tamas, Sattvika, Rajasa , Tamasa Guna is a word meaning ‘a quality,’ or ‘a characteristic.’ All Prakriti or all Nature possesses three basic qualities or Trigunas, those of Sattva, the quality of purity, truth, goodness, or substantial reality; Rajas, the quality of activity, passion, or desire; and Tamas, the quality of quiescence, darkness, ignorance, inertia, or immobility. Each one of these Trigunas has its good and its evil side; and each itself is threefold; hence there is a Sattva-sattva, a Rajas-sattva, and a Tamas-sattva; a Sattva-rajas, etc. These three qualities and their subdivisions may be traced in all visible and invisible things, and also in the actions of all living beings. When a man dies his Ego is in a Tamasa, a quiescent, state; when alive it is in a Rajasa state; while the divine-spiritual part of man, either during life or death, is in the Sattvika state. A wise man endeavors to express and live the highest aspects of all these three qualities.
  • Sattvika, Rajasa, and Tamasa are the Sanskrit adjectival forms of Sattva, Rajas, and Tamas.
  • (SP) Guna — quality, one of three qualities of prakrti: sattva [sattwa] — clarity or purity rajas — passion or activity tamas — darkness or inertia.
  • (WG) Gunasamya, the state in which the qualities — gunas — are in equilibrium.
  • (TG) Gunavat {Sans} . That which is endowed with qualities.
  • (FY) Gunavat, endowed with qualities.
  • (WG) Gunavisesha, modifications or affections of the qualities.
  • (MO) Gunnlod {Nors} (gun-leud) Giantess who served mead to Odin in the mountain
  • (TG) Gupta Vidya {Sans} . The same as Guhya Vidya; Esoteric or Secret Science; knowledge.
  • (KT) Gupta Vidya {Sans} The same as Guhya Vidya. Esoteric or secret science, knowledge.
  • (WG) Gupta-vidya, guarded or secret knowledge. ( gupta, hidden; vidya, knowledge
  • (SKf) Gupta-Vidya The Secret and Esoteric Wisdom of the ages, the fountain source of all Truth known to mankind. Gupta-Vidya is a compound of gupta — hidden, derived from the verb-root gup — to hide, to protect; and vidya — wisdom, derived from the verb-root vid — to know, to be wise.
  • (TG) Guru {Sans} . “Spiritual Teacher; a master in metaphysical and ethical doctrines; used also for a teacher of any science.
  • (VS) Seek not for him [[ guru ]] who is to give thee birth (I 20) [[p. 7]] The Initiate who leads the disciple through the Knowledge given to him to his spiritual, or second, birth is called the Father guru or Master.
  • (FY) Guru, spiritual preceptor.
  • (WG) Guru, a spiritual parent or preceptor. ( guru, weighty, important, worthy of honor
  • (OG) Guru — {Sans} Sometimes gurudeva, “master divine.” The word used in the old Sanskrit scriptures for teacher, preceptor. According to the beautiful teachings of the ancient wisdom, the guru acts as the midwife bringing to birth, helping to bring into the active life of the chela, the spiritual and intellectual parts of the disciple — the soul of the man. Thus the relationship between teacher and disciple is an extremely sacred one, because it is a tie which binds closely heart to heart, mind to mind. The idea is, again, that the latent spiritual potencies in the mind and heart of the learner shall receive such assistance in their development as the teacher can karmically give; but it does not mean that the teacher shall do the work that the disciple himself or herself must do. The learner or disciple must tread his own path, and the teacher cannot tread it for him. The teacher points the way, guides and aids, and the disciple follows the path.
  • (GH) Guru A Teacher, a Preceptor, especially one who imparts spiritual teachings to a disciple. ( Bhagavad-Gita, W. Q. Judge, p. 86)
  • (SKv) Guru, Gurudeva, Upadhyaya A Guru is a spiritual parent or spiritual preceptor. The word is derived from the verbal root guy — to raise, to lift up. Guru may also be used for the Higher Self within, whose influence is ever inspiring and uplifting the learning human being. In order to express the sacredness and reverence felt by the pupil towards his spiritual guide, inner or outer, a Guru is often called Gurudeva, ‘divine Teacher’ or the guide and awakener of the divine life within. Another word used in ancient Hindu literature for a spiritual guide is Upadhyaya, a compound of upa — according to, and the preposition adhi plus the verb-root i — meaning in combination ‘one who causes one to learn according to the Vedic scriptures or the wisdom-teachings.’
  • (SP) Guru — teacher.
  • (TG) Guru Deva {Sans} . Lit., “divine Master”.
  • (OG) Guru-parampara — {Sans} This is a compound formed of guru, meaning “teacher,” and a subordinate compound param-para , the latter compound meaning “a row or uninterrupted series or succession.” Hence guru-parampara signifies an uninterrupted series or succession of teachers. Every Mystery school or esoteric college of ancient times had its regular and uninterrupted series or succession of teacher succeeding teacher, each one passing on to his successor the mystical authority and headship he himself had received from his predecessor.
  • Like everything else of an esoteric character in the ancient world, the guru-parampara or succession of teachers faithfully copied what actually exists or takes place in nature herself, where a hierarchy with its summit or head is immediately linked on to a superior hierarchy as well as to an inferior one; and it is in this manner that the mystical circulations of the kosmos, and the transmission of life or vital currents throughout the fabric or web of being is assured.
  • From this ancient fact and teaching of the Mystery schools came the greatly distorted Apostolic Succession of the Christian Church, a pale and feeble reflection in merely ecclesiastical government of a fundamental spiritual and mystical reality. The great Brotherhood of the sages and seers of the world, which in fact is the association of the Masters of Wisdom and Compassion headed by the Maha-chohan, is the purest and most absolute form or example of the guru-parampara existing on our earth today. ( See also Hermetic Chain)
  • (SKf) Guruparampara ‘The Golden Chain of Hermes’; an uninterrupted succession of spiritual teachers one following another; a compound of guru — teacher, and parampara — one following the other. In the ancient Mystery-Schools, as in our own Theosophical Mystery-School, the Hierophant or Spiritual Guardian of the sacred teachings passed on his holy trust to another worthy one just as he had received it from the one before him. Another use of the word Guruparampara is the graded series of Divine Rulers ranging from the Hierophants of a Spiritual Center of Truth among men to the highest Divine Guardians of our Universe, and verily, even farther, beyond our ken.
  • (SP) Guru – parampara — a succession or lineage of teachers.
  • (TG) Gyan-Ben-Gian {Pers}. The King of the Peris, the Sylphs, in the old mythology of Iran.
  • (TG) Gyges {Greek}. “The ring of Ages” has become a familiar metaphor in European literature. Gyges was a Lydian who, after murdering the King Candaules, married his widow. Plato tells us that Gyges descended once into a chasm of the earth and discovered a brazen horse, within whose open side was the skeleton of a man who had a brazen ring on his finger. This ring when placed on his own finger made him invisible.
  • (KT) Gyges. “The ring of Gyges” has become a familiar metaphor in European literature. Gyges was a Lydian, who, after murdering the King Candaules, married his widow. Plato tells us that Gyges descending once into a chasm of the earth, discovered a brazen horse, within whose opened side was the skeleton of a man of gigantic stature, who had a brazen ring on his finger. This ring when placed on his own finger made him invisible.
  • (MO) Gylfe {Nors} (yil-veh) A legendary king and seeker of wisdom
  • (MO) Gymer {Nors} (yi-mayr) A giant: father of Gerd
  • (TG) Gymnosophists {Greek}. The name given by Hellenic writers to a class of naked or “air-clad” mendicants; ascetics in India: extremely learned and endowed with great mystic powers. It is easy to recognise in these gymnosophists the Hindu Arayaka of old, the learned yogis and ascetic philosophers who retired to the jungle and forest, there to reach, through great austerities, superhuman knowledge and experience.
  • (TG) Gyn {Tibe}. Knowledge acquired under the tuition of an adept teacher or guru.
  • (TG) H. — The eighth letter and aspirate of the English alphabet, and also the eighth in the Hebrew. As a Latin numeral it signifies 200 and with the addition of a dash 200,000; in the Hebrew alphabet Chethi is equivalent to h, corresponds to eight, and is symbolised by a Fence and Venus according to Seyffarth, being in affinity and connected with He, and therefore with the opening or womb. It is preeminently a Yonic letter.
  • (TG) Ha {Sans}. A magic syllable used in sacred formulae; it represents the power of Akasa Sati. Its efficacy lies in the expirational accent and the sound produced.
  • (FY) Ha, a magic syllable used in sacred formulae; represents the power of Akasa Sakti.
  • (WG) Ha, the sun; a symbol for the breath called prana in Hatha Yoga practices.
  • (TG) Habal de Garmin {Hebr}. According to the Kabbalah this is the Resurrection Body: a tzelem image or demooth similitude to the deceased man; an inner fundamental spiritual type remaining after death. It is the “Spirit of the Bones” mentioned in Daniel and Isaiah and the Psalms, and is referred to in the Vision of Ezekiel about the clothing of the dry bones with life: consult C. de Leiningen on the, Kabbalah, T.P.S. Pamphlet. Vol. II., No. 18. [w.w.w.]
  • (TG) Hachoser {Hebr}. Lit., “reflected Lights” a name for the minor or inferior powers, in the Kabbalah.
  • (TG) Hades {Greek}, or Aides. The “invisible”, i.e., the land of the shadows, one of whose regions was Tartarus, a place of complete darkness, like the region of profound dreamless sleep in the Egyptian Amenti. Judging by the allegorical description of the various punishments inflicted therein, the place was, purely Karmic. Neither Hades nor Amenti were the hell still preached by some retrograde priests and clergymen; but whether represented by the Elysian Fields or by Tartarus, Hades was a place of retributive justice and no more. This could only be reached by crossing the river to the “other shore”, i.e. by crossing the river Death, and being once more reborn, for weal or for woe. As well expressed in Egyptian Belief : “The story of Charon, the ferryman (of the Styx) is to be found not only in Homer, but in the poetry of many lands. The River must be crossed before gaining the Isles of the Blest. The Ritual of Egypt described a Charon and his boat long ages before Homer. He is Khu-en-ua, the hawk-headed steersman.” (See “Amenti “Hel” and “Happy Fields”
  • (KT) Hades {Greek}, or Aides, the “invisible,” the land of shadows; one of whose regions was Tartarus, a place of complete darkness, as was also the region of profound dreamless sleep in Amenti. Judging by the allegorical description of the punishments inflicted therein, the place was purely Karmic. Neither Hades nor Amenti were the Hell still preached by some retrograde priests and clergymen; and whether represented by the Elysian Fields or by Tartarus, they could only be reached by crossing the river to the “other shore.” As well expressed in the “Egyptian Belief,” the story of Charon, the ferryman (of the Styx) is to be found not only in Homer, but in the poetry of many lands. The River must be crossed before gaining the Isles of the Blest. The Ritual of Egypt described a Charon and his boat long ages before Homer. He is Khu-en-na, “the hawk-headed steersman.” (See Hell
  • (TG) Hagadah {Hebr}. A name given to parts of the Talmud which are legendary. [w.w.w.]
  • (TG) Hahnir {Nors}, or Honir. One of the three mighty gods (Odin, Hahnir and Lodur) who, while wandering on earth, found lying on the seashore two human forms, motionless, speechless, and senseless. Odin gave them souls; Hahnir, motion and senses; and Lodur, blooming complexions. Thus were men created.
  • (TG) Haima {Hebr}. The same as the Sanskrit hiranya (golden), as “the golden Egg” Hiranyagarbha.
  • (TG) Hair. Occult philosophy considers the hair (whether human or animal) as the natural receptacle and retainer of the vital essence which often escapes with other emanations from the body. It is closely connected with many of the brain functions for instance memory. With the ancient Israelites the cutting of the hair and beard was a sign of defilement, and “the Lord said unto Moses. They shall not make baldness upon “Baldness”, whether natural or artificial, was a sign of calamity, punishment, or grief, as when Isaiah (iii., 24) enumerates, “instead of well-set hair baldness”, among the evils that are ready to befall the chosen people. And again, “On all their heads baldness and every beard cut” ( Ibid. xv., 2). The Nazarite was ordered to let his hair and beard grow, and never to permit a razor to touch them. With the Egyptians and Buddhists it was only the initiated priest or ascetic to whom life is a burden, who shaved. The Egyptian priest was supposed to have become master of his body, and hence shaved his head for cleanliness; yet the Hierophants wore their hair long. The Buddhist still shaves his head to this day — as sign of scorn for life and health. Yet Buddha, after shaving his hair when he first became a mendicant, let it grow again and is always represented with the top-knot of a Yogi. The Hindu priests and Brahmins, and almost all the castes, shave the rest of the head but leave a long lock to grow from the centre of the crown. The ascetics of India wear their hair long, and so do the war-like Sikhs, and almost all the Mongolian peoples. At Byzantium and Rhodes the shaving of the beard was prohibited by law, and in Sparta the cutting of the beard was a mark of slavery and servitude. Among the Scandinavians, we are told, it was considered a disservice, “a mark of infamy”, to cut off the hair. The whole population of the island of Ceylon (the Buddhist Singhalese) wear their hair long. So do the Russian, (Greek and Armenian clergy, and monks. Jesus and the Apostles are always represented with their hair long, but fashion in Christendom proved stronger than Christianity, the old ecclesiastical rules (Constit. Apost. lib. I. c. 3) enjoining the clergy “to wear their hair and beards long”. (See Riddle’s Ecclesiastical Antiquities The Templars were commanded to wear their beards long. Samson wore his hair long, and the biblical allegory shows that health and strength and the very life are connected with the length of the hair. If a cat is shaved it will die in nine cases out of ten. A dog whose coat is not interfered with lives longer and is more intelligent than one whose coat is shaven. Many old people as they lose their hair lose much of their memory and become weaker. While the life of the Yogis is proverbially long, the Buddhist priests (of Ceylon and elsewhere) are not generally long-lived. Mussulmen shave their heads but wear their beards; and as their head is always covered, the danger is less.
  • (TG) Hajaschar {Hebr}. The Light Forces in the Kabbalah; the “Powers of Light”, which are the creative but inferior forces.
  • (TG) Hakem. Lit., “the Wise One”, the Messiah to come, of the Druzes or the “Disciples of Hamsa”.
  • (TG) Hakim {arabic}. A doctor, in all the Eastern countries, from Asia Minor to India.
  • (TG) Halachah {Hebr}. A name given to parts of the Talmud, which are arguments on points of doctrine; the word means “rule”. [w.w.w.]
  • (VS) It is the Hall in which thou saw’st the light, in which thou livest and shalt die (I 17) [[p. 6]] The phenomenal World of Senses and of terrestrial consciousness only.
  • (VS) Hall of Learning [[p. 6]] The Hall of Probationary Learning.
  • (TG) Hallucination. A state produced sometimes by physiological disorders, sometimes by mediumship, and at others by drunkenness. But the cause that produces the Visions has to be sought deeper than physiology. All such visions, especially when produced through mediumship, are preceded by a relaxation of the nervous system, invariably generating an abnormal magnetic condition which attracts to the sufferer waves of astral light. It is the latter that furnishes the various hallucinations. These, however, are not always what physicians would make them, empty and unreal dreams. No one can see that which does not exist — i.e., which is not impressed — in or on the astral waves. A Seer may, however, perceive objects and scenes (whether past, present, or future) which have no relation whatever to himself, and also perceive several things entirely disconnected with each other at one and the same time, thus producing the most grotesque and absurd combinations. Both drunkard and Seer, medium and Adept, see their respective visions in the Astral Light; but while the drunkard, the madman, and the untrained medium, or one suffering from brain-fever, see, because they cannot help it, and evoke the jumbled visions unconsciously to themselves, the Adept and the trained Seer have the choice and the control of such visions. They know where to fix their gaze, how to steady the scenes they want to observe, and how to see beyond the upper outward layers of the Astral Light. With the former such glimpses into the waves are hallucinations: with the latter they become the faithful reproduction of what actually has been, is, or will be, taking place. The glimpses at random caught by the medium, and his flickering visions in the deceptive light, are transformed under the guiding will of the Adept and Seer into steady pictures, the truthful representations of that which he wills to come within the focus of his perception.
  • (KT) Hallucinations. A state produced sometimes by physiological disorders, sometimes by mediumship, and at others by drunkenness. But the cause that produces the visions has to be sought deeper than physiology. All such, particularly when produced through mediumship, are preceded by a relaxation of the nervous system, generating invariably an abnormal magnetic condition which attracts to the sufferer waves of astral light. It is these latter that furnish the various hallucinations, which, however, are not always, as physicians would explain them, mere empty and unreal dreams. No one can see that which does not exist — i. e., which is not impressed — in or on the astral waves. But a seer may perceive objects and scenes (whether past, present or future) which have no relation whatever to himself; and perceive, moreover, several things entirely disconnected with each other at one and the same time, so as to produce the most grotesque and absurd combinations. But drunkard and seer, medium and adept see their respective visions in the astral light; only while the drunkard, the madman, and the untrained medium, or one in a brain fever, see, because they cannot help it, and evoke jumbled visions unconsciously to themselves without being able to control them, the adept and the trained Seer have the choice and the control of such visions. They know where to fix their gaze, how to steady the scenes they wish to observe, and how to see beyond the upper outward layers of the astral light. With the former such glimpses into the waves are hallucinations; with the latter they become the faithful reproduction of what actually has been, is, or will be taking place. The glimpses at random, caught by the medium, and his flickering visions in the deceptive light, are transformed under the guiding will of the adept and seer into steady pictures, the truthful representation of that which he wills to come within the focus of his perception.
  • (MO) Hamingja {Nors} (ha-ming-ya) [fortune] Guardian spirit
  • (TG) Hamsa or Hansa {Sans}. “Swan or goose”, according to the Orientalists; a mystical bird in Occultism analogous to the Rosicrucian Pelican. The sacred mystic name which, when preceded by that of KALA (infinite time), i.e. Kalahansa, is a name of Parabrahm; meaning the “Bird out of space and time”. Hence Brahma (male) is called Hansa Vahana “the Vehicle of Hansa” (the BIRD). We find the same idea in the Zohar, where Ain Suph (the endless and infinite) is said to descend into the universe, for purposes of manifestation, using Adam Kadmon (Humanity) as a chariot or vehicle.
  • (WG) Hamsa, (also Hansa), a mythical bird, corresponding some what to the swan, and which is the vehicle of Brahma; it symbolises spiritual wisdom. (Probably derived from aham, I, and sa, that: “I am that,” i . e ., the Supreme Spirit, — sa being a form of tad or tat . It may also be derived from han, “to go,” and would then mean “who goes eternally
  • (TG) Hamsa {arabic}. The founder of the mystic sect of the Druzes of Mount Lebanon. (See “Druzes”
  • (TG) Hangsa {Sans}. A mystic syllable standing for evolution, and meaning in its literal sense “I am he”, or Ahamsa.
  • (FY) Hangsa, a mystic syllable standing for evolution: it literally means “I am he.”
  • (TG) Hansa {Sans}. The name, according to the Bhagavata Purana , of the One Caste “when there were as yet no varieties of caste, but verily one Veda, one Deity and one Caste”.
  • (TG) Hanuman {Sans}. The monkey god of the Ramayana ; the generalissimo of Rama’s army; the son of Vayu, the god of the wind, and of a virtuous she-demon. Hanuman was the faithful ally of Rama and by his unparalleled audacity and wit, helped the Avatar of Vishnu to finally conquer the demon-king of Lanka, Ravana, who had carried off the beautiful Sita, Rama’s wife, an outrage which led to the celebrated war described in the Hindu epic poem.
  • (WG) Hanuman, (Hanumat), a monkey-chief, the most celebrated of a vast host of ape-like beings, who, according to the Ramayana, were created by the gods to be the allies of Rama-chandra in his war with Ravana. Hanumat was the son of Pavana or Maruta, “the Wind,” (according to some legends, of Siva,) and had many magical powers. (Literally, “having large jaws.”)
  • (WG) Hanuman, the “monkey god”.
  • (GH) Hanuman (nominative case: dictionary form or ‘crude form’. Hanumat) The celebrated monkey-deity of the Ramayana, son of Pavana, the god of the wind, by Anjana. His exploits partake more of the superhuman than human, thus they are favorite topics among the Hindus from youth to old age. As instances: the epic relates that he jumped from India to Ceylon in one leap; he tore up trees by the roots; he flew to and from the Himalayas bringing healing herbs to the wounded. It is related that he and his monkey host were created by the gods in order to assist Rama in his battle against Ravana and the Rakshasas of Lanka (Ceylon). Among mental achievements Hanuman is credited with being a skilled grammarian, and no one could equal him in the sastras (scriptures) and in the art of explaining them.
  • Arjuna had adopted the traditional representation of Hanuman as his crest. ( Bhagavad-Gita, W. Q. Judge, p. 4)
  • (TG) Happy Fields. The name given by the Assyrio-Chaldeans to their Elysian Fields, which were intermingled with their Hades. As Mr. Boscawen tells his readers — “The Kingdom of the underworld was the realm of the god Hea, and the Hades of the Assyrian legends was placed in the underworld, and was ruled over by a goddess, Nin-Kigal, or ‘the Lady of the Great Land’. She is also called Allat.” A translated inscription states: — “After the gifts of these present days, in the feasts of the land of the silver sky, the resplendent Courts, the abode of blessedness, and in the light of the Happy Fields, may he dwell in life eternal, holy, in the presence of the gods who inhabit Assyria”. This is worthy of a Christian tumulary inscription. Ishtar, the beautiful goddess, descended into Hades after her beloved Tammuz, and found that this dark place of the shades had seven spheres and seven gates, at each of which she had to leave something belonging to her.
  • (TG) Hara {Sans}. A title of the god Siva.
  • (TG) Hare-Worship. The hare was sacred in many lands and especially among the Egyptians and Jews. Though the latter consider it an unclean, hoofed animal, unfit to eat, yet it was held sacred by some tribes. The reason for this was that in a certain species of hare the male suckled the little ones. It was thus considered to be androgynous or hermaphrodite, and so typified an attribute of the Demiurge, or creative Logos. The hare was a symbol of the moon, wherein the face of the prophet Moses is to be seen to this day, say the Jews. Moreover the moon is connected with the worship of Jehovah, a deity preeminently the god of generation, perhaps also for the same reason that Eros, the god of sexual love, is represented as carrying a hare. The hare was also sacred to Osiris. Lenormand writes that the hare “has to be considered as the symbol of the Logos . . . the Logos ought to be hermaphrodite and we know that the hare is an androgynous type”.
  • (TG) Hari {Sans}. A title of Vishnu, but used also for other gods.
  • (WG) Hari, pale yellow or golden, bay — “bays,” the bay coursers of Indra; “the Remover,” a title given to Krishna.
  • (GH) Hari Especially the name of Krishna as an Avatara of Vishnu; applied also to Vishnu and Siva. ( Bhagavad-Gita, W. Q. Judge, p. 79)
  • (TG) Harikesa {Sans}. The name of one of the seven rays of the Sun.
  • (WG) Harivant, “lord of the bay coursers” — a title of Indra.
  • (TG) Hariyansa {Sans}. A portion of the Mahabharata, a poem on the genealogy of Vishnu, or Hari.
  • (TG) Harmachus {Greek}. The Egyptian Sphinx, called Har-em-chu or “Horus (the Sun) in the Horizon”, a form of Ra the sun-god; esoterically the risen god. An inscription on a tablet reads: “O blessed Ra-Harmachus! Thou careerest by him in triumph. O shine, Amoun-Ra-Harmachus self-generated”. The temple of the Sphinx was discovered by Mariette Bey close to the Sphinx, near the great Pyramid of Gizeh. All the Egyptologists agree in pronouncing the Sphinx and her temple the “oldest religious monument of the world”at any rate of Egypt. “The principal chamber”, writes the late Mr. Fergusson ” in the form of a cross, is supported by piers, simple prisms of Syenite granite without base or capital . . no sculptures or inscriptions of any sort are found on the walls of this temple, no ornament or symbol nor any image in the sanctuary”. This proves the enormous antiquity of both the Sphinx and the temple.” The great bearded Sphinx of the Pyramids of Gizeh is the symbol of Harmachus, the same as each Egyptian Pharaoh who bore, in the inscriptions, the name of ‘living form of the Solar Sphinx upon the Earth’,”writes Brugsh Bey. And Renan recalls that “at one time the Egyptians were said to have temples without sculptured images” (Bonwick). Not only the Egyptians but every nation of the earth began with temples devoid of idols and even of symbols. It is only when the remembrance of the great abstract truths and of the primordial Wisdom taught to humanity by the dynasties of the divine kings died out that men had to resort to mementos and symbology. In the story of Horus in some tablets of Edfou, Rouge found an inscription showing that the god had once assumed “the shape of a human-headed lion to gain advantage over his enemy Typhon. Certainly Horns was so adored in Leontopolis. He is the real Sphinx. That accounts, too, for the lion figure being sometimes seen on each side of Isis. . . It was her child And yet the story of Harmachus, or Har-eni-chu, is still left untold to the world, nor is it likely to be divulged to this generation. (See “Sphinx
  • (TG) Harpocrates {Greek}. The child Hortisorehoou represented with a finger on his mouth, the solar disk upon his head and golden hair. He is the “god of Silence” and of Mystery. (See “Horus”). Harpocrates was also worshipped by both Greeks and Romans in Europe as a son of Isis.
  • (WG) Harpocrates, the “god of Silence and Mystery” in Egyptian mythology. He is represented with a finger on his mouth, and is either standing, or sitting on a Lotus. An aspect of Horus, the child of Isis and Osiris.
  • (TG) Harshana {Sans}. A deity presiding over offerings to the dead, or Sraddha.
  • (TG) Harviri {Egyp}. Horus, the elder: the ancient name of a solar god: the rising sun represented as a god reclining on a full-blown lotus, the symbol of the Universe.
  • (TG) Haryaswas {Sans}. The five and ten thousand sons of Daksha, who instead of peopling the world as desired by their father, all became yogis, as advised by the mysterious sage Narada, and remained celibates. “They dispersed through the regions and have not returned.” This means, according to the secret science, that they had all incarnated in mortals. The name is given to natural born mystics and celibates, who are said to be incarnations of the “Haryaswas”.
  • (GH) Hastinapura The city founded by king Hastin (the great-great-grandfather of Kuru), which became the capital city of the kings of the Chandravansa (the ‘Lunar Dynasty’), and the principal city of the Kurus. A great part of the main action of the Mahabharata centers about this city. It formed the main objective of the Pandavas in the great conflict at Kurukshetra (between the Kurus and the Pandavas), at the conclusion of which the victorious Yudhishthira was crowned king after a triumphal entry into the city. Hastinapura was situated about 57 miles north-east of the modern city of Delhi on the banks of an old channel of the Ganges river. (Meaning of the word itself: the city of the elephant — hastin, an elephant. Bhagavad-Gita, W. Q. Judge, p. i)
  • (TG) Hatchet. In the Egyptian Hieroglyphics a symbol of power, and also of death. The hatchet is called the “Severer of the Knot” i.e., of marriage or any other tie.
  • (TG) Hatha Yoga {Sans}. The lower form of Yoga practice; one which uses physical means for purposes of spiritual self-development. The opposite of Raja Yoga.
  • (FY) Hatha Yog, a system of physical training to obtain psychic powers, the chief feature of this system being the regulation of breath.
  • (WG) Hatha-yoga, a system of physical practices designed to cultivate will-power, withdraw the mind from external objects, and bring about certain changes of condition in the physical body, for the attainment of the lower siddhis or magical powers. It involves great austerities, difficult and often painful postures, control of the breath, etc., is attended with great dangers, and yet, at its best, results in merely abnormal cultivation of physical and Psychical powers, at the expense of spiritual progress . ( hatha , violence, force ; yoga, union, contemplation: forcing the mind to abstain from external objects
  • (TG) Hathor {Egyp}. The lower or infernal aspect of Isis, corresponding to the Hecate of Greek mythology.
  • (MO) Havarnal {Nors} (haw-va-mawl) [ har high + mal speech] Lay of the High One
  • (TG) Hawk. The hieroglyphic and type of the Soul. The sense varies with the postures of the bird. Thus when lying as dead it represents the transition, larva state, or the passage from the state of one life to another. When its wings are opened it means that the defunct is resurrected in Amenti and once more in conscious possession of his soul. The chrysalis has become a butterfly.
  • (TG) Hayo Bischat {Hebr}. The Beast, in the Zohar : the Devil and Tempter. Esoterically our lower animal passions.
  • (TG) Hay-yah {Hebr}. One of the metaphysical human “Principles”. Eastern Occultists divide men into seven such Principles; Western Kabbalists, we are told, into three only — namely, Nephesh, Ruach and Neshamah. But in truth, this division is as loose and as mere an abbreviation is our “Body, Soul, Spirit”. For, in the Qabbalah of Myer ( Zohar., 141, b., Cremona Ed. ii., fol. 63 b ., col. 251) it is stated that Neshamah or Spirit likes three divisions, “the highest being Ye’hee-dah (Atma) the middle, Hay-yah (Buddhi), and the last and third, the Neshamah, properly speaking (Manas)”. Then comes Mahshabah, Thought (the lower Manas, or conscious Personality), in which the higher then manifest themselves, thus making four ; this is followed by Tzelem, Phantom of the Image ( Kama-rupa in life the Karmic element) D’yooq-nah, Shadow of the image (Linga Sharira, the Double); and Zitrath, Prototype, which is Life — SEVEN in all, even without the D’mooth, Likeness or Similitude, which is called a lower manifestation, and is in reality the Guf, or Body. Theosophists of the E. S. who know the transposition made of Atma and the part taken by the auric prototype, will easily find which are the real seven, and assure themselves that between the division of Principles of the Eastern Occultists and that of the real Eastern Kabbalists there is no difference. Do not let us forget that neither the one nor the other are prepared to give out the real and final classification in their public writings.
  • (TG) Hay-yoth ha Qadosh {Hebr}. The holy living creatures of Ezekiel’s vision of the Merkabak, or vehicle, or chariot. These are the four symbolical beasts, the cherubim of Ezekiel, and in the Zodiac Taurus, Leo, Scorpio (or the Eagle), and Aquarius, the man.
  • (TG) Hea {Chald}. The god of the Deep and the Underworld; some see in him Ea or Oannes, the fish-man, or Dagon.
  • (TG) Heabani {Chald}. A famous astrologer at the Court of Izdubar, frequently mentioned in the fragments of the Assyrian tablets in reference to a dream of Izdubar, the great Babylonian King, or Nimrod, the “mighty hunter before the Lord”. After his death, his soul being unable to rest underground, the ghost of Heabani was raised by Merodach, the god, his body restored to life and then transferred alive, like Elijah, to the regions of the Blessed.
  • (TG) Head of all Heads Used of the “Ancient of the Ancients” Atteekali D’atteekeen, who is the “Hidden of the Hidden, the Concealed of the Concealed”. In this cranium of the “White Head”, Resha Hivrah, “dwell daily 13,000 myriads of worlds, which rest upon It, lean upon It” ( Zohar iii . Idrah Rabbah ). . . “In that Atteekah nothing is revealed except the Head alone, because it is the Head of all Heads. . . The Wisdom above, which is the Head, is hidden in it, the Brain which is tranquil and quiet, and none knows it but Itself. . . . And this Hidden Wisdom . . . the Concealed of the Concealed, the Head of all Heads, a Head which is not a Head, nor does any one know, nor is it ever known, what is in that Head which Wisdom and Reason cannot comprehend” ( Zohar iii., fol. 288 a ). This is said of the Deity of which the Head ( i.e ., Wisdom perceived by all) is alone manifested. Of that Principle which is still higher nothing is even predicated, except that its universal presence and actuality are a philosophical necessity.
  • (VS) thus have I Heard (II 10) [[p. 27]] The usual formula that precedes the Buddhist Scriptures, meaning, that that which follows is what has been recorded by direct oral tradition from Buddha and the Arhats.
  • (VS) chamber of the Heart (I 23) [[p. 9]] The inner chamber of the Heart, called in Sanskrit Brahma poori . The “fiery power” is Kundalini.
  • (VS) Doctrine of the Heart (II1) [[p. 23]] The two schools of Buddha’s doctrine, the esoteric and the exoteric, are respectively called the “Heart” and the “Eye” Doctrine, Bodhidharma called them in China from whence the names reached Tibet the Tsung-men (esoteric) and Kiau-men (exoteric school). It is so named, because it is the teaching which emanated from Gautama Buddha’s heart, whereas the “Eye” Doctrine was the work of his head or brain. The “Heart Doctrine” is also called “the seal of truth” or the “true seal,” a symbol found on the heading of almost all esoteric works.
  • (VS) Secret Heart (II 3) [[p. 24]] “Secret Heart” is the esoteric doctrine.
  • (TG) Heavenly Adam. The synthesis of the Sephirothal Tree, or of all the Forces in Nature and their informing deific essence. In the diagrams, the Seventh of the lower Sephiroth, Sephira Malkhooth — the Kingdom of Harmony — represents the feet of the ideal Macrocosm, whose head reaches to the first manifested Head, This Heavenly Adam is the natura naturans, the abstract world, while the Adam of Earth (Humanity) is the natura naturata or the material universe. The fomier is the presence of Deity in its universal essence; the latter the manifestation of the intelligence of that essence. In the real Zohar — not the fantastic and anthropomorphic caricature which we often find in the writings of Western Kabbalists — there is not a particle of the personal deity which we find so prominent in the dark cloaking of the Secret Wisdom known as the Mosaic Pentateuch.
  • (TG) Hebdomad {Greek}. The Septenary.
  • (TG) Hebron or Kirjath-Ayba. The city of the Four Kabeiri, for Kirjath Arba signifies “the City of the Four”. It is in that city, according to the legend, that an Isarim or an Initiate found the famous Smaragdine tablet on the dead body of Hermes.
  • (MO) Heid {Nors} (hayd) [ heid bright sky] A vala or sibyl: nature’s memory of the past
  • (MO) Heidrun {Nors} (hayd-run) [ heidr heath or honor] The goat that nibbles the bark of the Tree of Life
  • (MO) Heimdal {Nors} (haym-dahl) [ heim home + dal dell] “The whitest Ase.” Celestial guardian of Bifrost
  • (TG) Hel or Hela {Nors}. The Goddess-Queen of the Land of the Dead; the inscrutable and direful Being who reigns over the depths of Helheim and Nifelheim. In the earlier mythology, Hel was the earth-goddess, the good and beneficent mother, nourisher of the weary and the hungry. But in the later Shades she became the female Pluto, the dark Queen of the Kingdom of Shades, she who brought death into this world, and sorrow afterwards.
  • (MO) Hel {Nors} (hayl) [death] The daughter of Loki, ruler of the kingdom of the dead. She is represented as half blue, half white
  • (TG) Helheim {Nors}. The Kingdom of the Dead in the Norse mythology. In the Edda, Helheim surrounds the Northern Mistworld, called Nifelheim.
  • (TG) Heliolatry {Greek}. Sun-Worship.
  • (TG) Hell. A term with the Anglo-Saxons, evidently derived from the name of the goddess Hela, and by the Sclavonians from the Greek Hades: hell being in Russian and other Sclavonian tongues — ad, the only difference between the Scandinavian cold hell and the hot hell of the Christians, being found in their respective temperatures. But even the idea of those overheated regions is not original with the Europeans, many peoples having entertained the conception of an underworld climate; as well may we if we localise our Hell in the centre of the earth. All exoteric religions — the creeds of the Brahmans, Buddhists, Zoroastrians, Mohammedans, Jews, and the rest, make their hells hot and dark, though many are more attractive than frightful. The idea of a hot hell is an afterthought, the distortion of an astronomical allegory. With the Egyptians, Hell became a place of punishment by fire not earlier than the seventeenth or eighteenth dynasty when Typhon was transformed from a god into a devil. But at whatever time this dread superstition was implanted in the minds of the poor ignorant masses, the scheme of a burning hell and souls tormented therein is purely Egyptian. Ra (the Sun) became the Lord of the Furnace in Karr, the hell of the Pharaohs, and the sinner was threatened with misery “in the heat of infernal fires”. “A lion was there” says Dr. Birch “and was called the roaring monster”. Another describes the place as “the bottomless pit and lake of fire, into which the victims are thrown” (compare Revelation). The Hebrew word gai-hinnom (Gehenna) never really had the significance given to it in Christian orthodoxy.
  • (KT) Hell. A term which the Anglo-Saxon race has evidently derived from the name of the Scandinavian goddess, Hela, just as the word ad, in Russian and other Slavonian tongues expressing the same conception, is derived from the Greek Hades, the only difference between the Scandinavian cold Hell, and the hot Hell of the Christians, being found in their respective temperatures. But even the idea of these overheated regions is not original with the Europeans, many people having entertained the conception of an under-world climate; as well we may, if we localise our Hell in the centre of the earth. All exoteric religions — the creeds of the Brahmans, Buddhists, Zoroastrians, Mahomedans, Jews, and the rest, made their Hells hot and dark, though many were more attractive than frightful. The idea of a hot Hell is an afterthought, the distortion of an astronomical allegory. With the Egyptians Hell became a place of punishment by fire not earlier than the 17th or 18th Dynasty, when Typhon was transformed from a God into a Devil. But at whatever time they implanted this dread superstition in the minds of the poor ignorant masses, the scheme of a burning Hell and souls tormented therein is purely Egyptian. Ra (the Sun) became the Lord of the Furnace, in Karr, the Hell of the Pharaohs, and the sinner was threatened with misery “in the heat of infernal fires.” “A lion was there,” says Dr. Birch, “and was called the roaring monster.” Another describes the place as “the bottomless pit and lake of fire, into which the victims are thrown” (compare Revelation) . The Hebrew word gai-hinnom (gehena) had never really the significance given to it in Christian orthodoxy.
  • (OG) Heaven and Hell — Every ancient exoteric religion taught that the so-called heavens are divided into steps or grades of ascending bliss and purity; and the so-called hells into steps or grades of increasing purgation or suffering. Now the esoteric doctrine or occultism teaches that the one is not a punishment, nor is the other strictly speaking a reward. The teaching is, simply, that each entity after physical death is drawn to the appropriate sphere to which the karmic destiny of the entity and the entity’s own character and impulses magnetically attract it. As a man works, as a man sows, in his life, that and that only shall he reap after death. Good seed produces good fruit; bad seed, tares — and perhaps even nothing of value or of spiritual use follows a negative and colorless life.
  • After the second death, the human monad “goes” to devachan — often called in theosophical literature the heaven-world. There are many degrees in devachan: the highest, the intermediate, and the lowest. What becomes of the entity, on the other hand, the lower human soul, that is so befouled and weighted with earth thought and the lower instincts that it cannot rise? There may be enough in it of the spirit nature to hold it together as an entity and enable it to become a reincarnating being, but it is foul, it is heavy; its tendency is consequently downwards. Can it therefore rise into a heavenly felicity? Can it go even into the lower realms of devachan and there enjoy its modicum of the beatitude, bliss, of everything that is noble and beautiful? No. There is an appropriate sphere for every degree of development of the ego-soul, and it gravitates to that sphere and remains there until it is thoroughly purged, until the sin has been washed out, so to say. These are the so-called hells, beneath even the lowest ranges of devachan; whereas the arupa heavens are the highest parts of the devachan. Nirvana is a very different thing from the heavens. ( See also Kama-Loka, Avichi, Devachan, Nirvana)
  • (MO) Hel’s road {Nors} The path from birth toward death
  • (TG) Hemadri {Sans}. The golden Mountain; Meru.
  • (TG) Hemera {Greek}. “The light of the inferior or terrestrial regions” as Ether is the light of the superior heavenly spheres. Both are born of Erebos (darkness) and Nux (night).
  • (TG) Heptakis {Greek}. “The Seven-rayed One” of the Chaldean astrolaters: the same as IAO.
  • (TG) Herakles {Greek}. The same as Hercules.
  • (TG) Heranasikha {Sing} From Heyana “novice” and Sikha “rule” or precept: manual of Precepts. A work written in Elu or the ancient Singhalese, for the use of young priests.
  • (VS) Great Heresy (I 8) [[p. 4]] Attavada, the heresy of the belief in Soul or rather in the separateness of Soul or Self from the One Universal, infinite SELF.
  • (TG) Hermanubis {Greek}. Or Hermes Anubis “the revealer of the mysteries of the lower world” — not of Hell or Hades as interpreted, but of our Earth (the lowest world of the septenary , chain of worlds) –and also of the sexual mysteries. Creuzer must have guessed at the truth of the right interpretation, as he calls Anubis-Thoth-Hermes ” a symbol of science and of the intellectual world ” . He was always represented with a cross in his hand, one of the earliest symbols of the mystery of generation, or procreation on this earth. In the Chaldean Kabbala (Book of Numbers) the Tat symbol, or +, is referred to its Adam and Eve, the latter being the transverse or horizontal bar drawn out of the side (or rib) of Hadam , the perpendicular bar. The fact is that, esoterically, Adam and Eve while representing the early third Root Race — those who, being still mindless, imitated the animals and degraded themselves with the latter — stand also as the dual symbol of the sexes. Hence Anubis, the Egyptian god of generation, is represented with the head of an animal, a dog or a jackal, and is also said to be the “Lord of the under world ” or “Hades” into which he introduces the souls of the dead (the reincarnating entities), for Hades is in one sense the womb, as some of the writings of the Church Fathers fully show.
  • (TG) Hermaphrodite {Greek}. Dual-sexed; a male and female Being, whether man or animal.
  • (TG) Hermas {Greek}. An ancient Greek writer of whose works only a few fragments arc now extant.
  • (KT) Hermas, an ancient Greek writer, of whose works only a few fragments now remain extant.
  • HERMES
  • The Emerald Tablet by Hermes Trismegistus
  • Truly, without Deceit, certainly and absolutely:
  • That which is Below corresponds to that which is Above, and that which is Above corresponds to that which is Below, in the accomplishment of the Miracle of One Thing. And just as all things have come from One, through the Mediation of One, so all things follow from this One Thing in the same way.
  • (TG) Hermes-fire. The same as “Elmes-fire”. (See Isis Unveiled
  • (TG) Hermes Sarameyas (Greco-Sanskrit). The God Hermes, or Mercury, he who watches over the flock of stars in the Greek mythology.
  • (TG) Hermes Trismegistus {Greek}. The “thrice great Hermes”, the Egyptian. The mythical personage after whom the Hermetic philosophy was named. In Egypt the God Thoth or Thot. A generic name of many ancient Greek writers on philosophy and Alchemy. Hermes Trismegistus is the name of Hermes or Thoth in his human aspect, as a god he is far more than this. As Hermes-Thoth-Aah, he is Thoth, the moon, i.e., his symbol is the bright side of the moon, supposed to contain the essence of creative Wisdom, “the elixir of Hermes”. As such he is associated with the Cynocephalus, the dog-headed monkey, for the same reason as was Anubis, one of the aspects of Thoth. (See “Hermanubis The same idea underlies the form of the Hindu God of Wisdom, the elephant-headed Ganesa, or Ganpat, the son of Parvati and Siva. (See “Ganesa” When he has the head of an ibis, lie is the sacred scribe of the gods; but even then he wears the crown atef and the lunar disk. He is the most mysterious of gods. As a serpent, Hermes Thoth is the divine creative Wisdom. The Church Fathers speak at length of Thoth-Hermes.
  • (WG) Hermes Trismegistus, the “founder” of the Hermetic philosophy. A purely mythical personage, whose name has been appropriated by many of the Greek Alchemists. The same as the Egyptian god Thoth, the celestial scribe, who records the thoughts and words of all men, and on whose tablets are to be found the mysteries of the ages.
  • (TG) Hermetic. Any doctrine or writing connected with the esoteric teachings of Hermes, who, whether as the Egyptian Thoth or the Greek Hermes, was the God of Wisdom with the Ancients, and, according to Plato, “discovered numbers, geometry, astronomy and letters”. Though mostly considered as spurious, nevertheless the Hermetic writings were highly prized by St. Augustine, Lactantius, Cyril and others. In the words of Mr. J. Bonwick, “They are more or less touched up by the Platonic philosophers among the early Christians (such as Origen and Clemens Alexandrinus) who sought to substantiate their Christian arguments by appeals to these heathen and revered writings, though they could not resist the temptation of making them say a little too much”. Though represented by some clever and interested writers as teaching pure monotheism, the Hermetic or Trismegistic books are, nevertheless, purely pantheistic. The Deity referred to in them is defined by Paul as that in which “we live, and move and have our being” — notwithstanding the “in Him” of the translators.
  • (WG) Hermetic Philosophy, the philosophic system of Hermes Trismegistus, of which unreliable fragments alone remain in Western literature.
  • (OG) Hermetic Chain — Among the ancient Greeks there existed a mystical tradition of a chain of living beings, one end of which included the divinities in their various grades or stages of divine authority and activities, and the other end of which ran downwards through inferior gods and heroes and sages to ordinary men, and to the beings below man. Each link of this living chain of beings inspired and instructed the chain below itself, thus transmitting and communicating from link to link to the end of the marvelous living chain, love and wisdom and knowledge concerning the secrets of the universe, eventuating in mankind as the arts and the sciences necessary for human life and civilization. This was mystically called the Hermetic Chain or the Golden Chain.
  • (IN) the ancient Mysteries the teaching of the existence and nature of the Hermetic Chain was fully explained; it is a true teaching because it represents distinctly and clearly and faithfully true and actual operations of nature. More or less faint and distorted copies of the teaching of this Hermetic Chain or Golden Chain or succession of teachers were taken over by various later formal and exoteric sects, such as the Christian Church, wherein the doctrine was called the Apostolic Succession. In all the great Mystery schools of antiquity there was this succession of teacher following teacher, each one passing on the light to his successor as he himself had received it from his predecessor; and as long as this transmission of light was a reality, it worked enormous spiritual benefit among men. Therefore all such movements lived, flourished, and did great good in the world. These teachers were the messengers to men from the Great Lodge of the Masters of Wisdom and Compassion. ( See also Guru-parampara)
  • (IU) Hermetist. — From Hermes, the god of Wisdom, known in Egypt, Syria, and Phoenicia as Thoth, Tat, Adad, Seth, and Sat-an (the latter not to be taken in the sense applied to it by Moslems and Christians), and in Greece as Kadmus. The kabalists identify him with Adam- Kadmon, the first manifestation of the Divine Power, and with Enoch. There were two Hermes: the elder was the Trismegistus, and the second an emanation, or “permutation” of himself; the friend and instructor of Isis and Osiris. Hermes is the god of the priestly wisdom, like Mazeus.
  • (WG) Hermetist, one who follows the philosophy of Hermes Trismegistus.
  • (MO) Hermod {Nors} (hayr-mood) [ herr a host + modr wrath, mood] An Ase: a son of Odin
  • (TG) Hetu {Sans}. A natural or physical cause.
  • (WG) Hetumat, having cause or origin; proceeding from a cause. (Literally, “having, the hetu ,” reason for an inference, the second member of the five-membered Nyaga syllogism
  • (TG) Heva {Hebr}. Eve. “the mother of all that lives”.
  • (WG) Heya-gunas, bad qualities.
  • (TG) Hiarchas {Greek}. The King of the Wise Men in the Journey of Apollonius of Tyana to India.
  • (OG) Hierarchy — The word hierarchy merely means that a scheme or system or state of delegated directive power and authority exists in a self-contained body, directed, guided, and taught by one having supreme authority, called the hierarch. The name is used by theosophists, by extension of meaning, as signifying the innumerable degrees, grades, and steps of evolving entities in the kosmos, and as applying to all parts of the universe; and rightly so, because every different part of the universe — and their number is simply countless — is under the vital governance of a divine being, of a god, of a spiritual essence; and all material manifestations are simply the appearances on our plane of the workings and actions of these spiritual beings behind it.
  • The series of hierarchies extends infinitely in both directions. If he so choose for purposes of thought, man may consider himself at the middle point, from which extends above him an unending series of steps upon steps of higher beings of all grades — growing constantly less material and more spiritual, and greater in all senses — towards an ineffable point. And there the imagination stops, not because the series itself stops, but because our thought can reach no farther out nor in. And similar to this series, an infinitely great series of beings and states of beings descends downwards (to use human terms) — downwards and downwards, until there again the imagination stops, merely because our thought can go no farther.
  • The summit, the acme, the flower, the highest point (or the hyparxis) of any series of animate and inanimate beings, whether we enumerate the stages or degrees of the series as seven or ten or twelve (according to whichever system we follow), is the divine unity for that series or hierarchy, and this hyparxis or highest being is again in its turn the lowest being of the hierarchy above it, and so extending onwards forever — each hierarchy manifesting one facet of the divine kosmic life, each hierarchy showing forth one thought, as it were, of the divine thinkers.
  • Various names were given to these hierarchies considered as series of beings. The generalized Greek hierarchy as shown by writers in periods preceding the rise of Christianity may be collected and enumerated as follows: (1) Divine; (2) Gods, or the divine-spiritual; (3) Demigods, sometimes called divine heroes, involving a very mystical doctrine; (4) Heroes proper; (5) Men; (6) Beasts or animals; (7) Vegetable world; (8) Mineral world; (9) Elemental world, or what was called the realm of Hades. The Divinity (or aggregate divine lives) itself is the hyparxis of this series of hierarchies, because each of these nine stages is itself a subordinate hierarchy. This (or any other) hierarchy of nine, hangs like a pendant jewel from the lowest hierarchy above it, which makes the tenth counting upwards, which tenth we can call the superdivine, the hyperheavenly, this tenth being the lowest stage (or the ninth, counting downwards) of still another hierarchy extending upwards; and so on, indefinitely.
  • One of the noblest of the theosophical teachings, and one of the most far-reaching in its import, is that of the hierarchical constitution of universal nature. This hierarchical structure of nature is so fundamental, so basic, that it may be truly called the structural framework of being. ( See also Planes) WW Hierarchies [[This]] is an exceedingly difficult subject because so much is involved in it. Let us go backwards instead of forwards. A great many people, preeminently the Christians themselves (because no people know less about their religion than do the Christians) do not know that Christian mythology, or, as I do not wish to be offensive, Christian theology, in those branches which pertain to the more recondite aspects of their creeds — few Christians know, I repeat, that they had, and their Teacher taught, a hierarchical succession in Nature. As embodied in the early Christian writings this hierarchical system was divided into nine classes; these nine classes being further subdivided into three triads. I will write it on the blackboard very shortly, so as to make it clear. Their angelical orders, like everything of value in Christianity, came direct from the pagans, the pagans in this instance, being the Syrians, Chaldeans, and Arabians, and the Neo-platonists. A similar series of divine beings, proceeding from the divinity down to the lowest, has been believed in by all peoples of all times. From the Scandinavian fjords to the plains of Arabia, from China to Peru, in all countries, we will find the same belief in a hierarchical system by which the universe is governed, a hierarchical system of divine beings, if you please. The word hierarchy comes from the Greek hieros ( hieros ), holy, and archein ( archein ), i.e., to be at the beginning, at the head; hence to lead, to rule. Now these words joined, we have the word hierarchy — a government by deputation from a divine source. The Deity, to put it in plain words, governs through deputies, lesser gods in heaven, and priests on earth; hence the word remaining alive in its original significance. In the church of Rome exists the Roman hierarchy, the head of which is the Pope, and the head of him is the Lord Jesus, since the Pope is the vicegerent of God on earth. Under the Pope, the cardinals; although according to one theory in the Roman Church itself, there seems to be a tendency to believe that the cardinals as a united body, in conclave, are possibly equal in authority to the Pope himself. In certain of the Protestant churches, also, there is a hierarchy, as in the Anglican Church, in which the Archbishop of Canterbury is the hierarchial head. Under him are the bishops; under these are the priests; under the priests are the lesser priests, called the curates; and there are other orders of greater or less dignity, deans, deacons, and heaven knows what else. There is a somewhat similar system in the American Episcopal Church which is fundamentally the same as the Anglican church. This system embodies the principle of derivation of spiritual authority from another always a step higher. This hierarchical system is the cause, the basis, of the power of Rome. Its coherence, the instant communication of orders from center to circumference, the sense of unity, the recognition of authority, the feeling of brotherhood, makes the common bond, which is so strong that all the onslaughts and attacks of science, logic, reason, history, have been unable at the present day to do more than shatter the outward fortifications of the Church of Rome. The Church of Rome, as the great English Rationalist Hobbes once said, is the ghost of the Roman empire; and it is still a marvelously powerful ghost. The seeds of its disintegration must be sown within its own body. The Modernism of today is becoming a powerful force for progress in it. Hierarchies is one of the keys to the natural religion of mankind, which is Theosophy. The religions of the ancient world without exception not even excepting the Jewish, and the religions of ancient America, as far as we can know them from the writings of the prejudiced priests who wrote the books from which we derive our information — all these show that the world was governed on the hierarchical system, the orders or classes of being proceeding from the Deity ‘downwards’ ever growing more material. The whole system of the government of the universe was conceived of as a deputation of authority. Man was one of the steps; below man were the animals; below the animals, the plants; below the plants, the minerals; below the minerals, the elementals — until another world begins, which is a very abstruse subject that I cannot touch upon here. Above man were the Gods, the spiritual beings; above the Gods, others called Super-Archangels, if you like; above them were the Thrones, and the Dominations and Powers, all names conveying the idea of a procession of authority, which we are attempting to describe. The ‘angelic’ hierarchy, as the Christians have it, dates from the 6th century, and it is first found in a writer who calls himself, or rather who is known as, Dionysius the Areopagite, from the Areopagus, the Hill of Athens. He was associated with some legend connected with the Areopagus. As my memory serves me, according to the Christian legend he was one of St. Paul’s first converts, an Athenian named Dionysius, and he was converted on the Areopagus, or belonged to the Council of Mar’s Hill, and he took the name Areopagite or Areopagites, as a surname — Dionysius the Areopagite. There is no foundation for this legend of his Athenian derivation, beyond the passage in Acts xvii, 4. He divided, as I have previously hinted, the hierarchical series into nine orders, subdivided into three triads. They are as follows as he gives them: First Triad 1. First and highest, Seraphim or the Seraphs, a word derived from the Hebrew [[heb char]] (ShRPh) referring to the fire, fiery essence. 2. Cherubim, also from the Hebrew, the word [[heb char]] (ChRVB) being of very First doubtful origin; but, as learned and pious Triad Christian commentators put it, there is no question of their being of angelical nature, because it is not true that the Lord God once rode upon a Cherub and Fly? [rode upon a Cherub and Fly? See II Sam . 11, 11. Fly is not a noun here, but a verb — flew.– J.D.] ( Samuel ), 22, 11, Psalms 3. The Thrones ; this makes the first triad. Second Triad 4. Dominations 5. Virtues 6. Powers Third Triad 7. Principalities 8. Archangels 9. Angels WW Hierarchies [[W]]e will remark on the following nine orders: Gods, angelic orders, daimons, heroes, men, animals, plants, minerals, and elementals. Before we begin it might be well to say something about elementals. They form properly the ninth in the hierarchy which I have just mentioned because they are at the bottom of the scale; and those entities which are at the bottom of any scale consisting of nine units are elemental in their nature. You will remember we said that the angels were the ninth in order of the hierarchy or ladder of beings, as given by Dionysius called the Areopagite. He was called the Areopagite because he was supposed to be that individual whom Paul met, converted, and turned to Christianity when he visited Athens. There is a Dionysius mentioned in the Gospel of the Christians, in Acts xvii, 34, as being one of the individuals whom Paul converted; and medieval scholastics supposed that this Dionysius was later ‘Bishop’ of the church of Athens, and was still later transferred to Paris to become bishop of a certain district in northern France; and it pleased Gallic pride to suppose that their St. Denis and the writer calling himself Dionysius the Areopagite were one and the same person. The probability is, however — a probability which is almost certainly the fact — that whoever the writer may have been who threw his thoughts into the form of the work which has come down to us ascribed to Dionysius the Areopagite, drew his inspiration and a source of his knowledge from the Neoplatonic School. We find the same system of hierarchical governance of the world set forth; we find the same attributes, to a large extent, ascribed to the Deity; we find the same general Neoplatonic way of looking at the world and man, at the beings between man and the Deity and the beings under man. Now, coming to our hierarchy: 1st Triad 1. Gods (Any other name would be, probably, as apt; I merely chose the words angelical order, because angelical comes from the Greek word meaning messenger, and all things are from the gods 2. Angelical order 3. Daimones 2nd Triad 4. Heroes 5. Men 6. Animals 3rd Triad 7. Plants 8. The mineral world 9. Elementals, and a new world begins, a new hierarchy. You will remember that when we spoke of gods in our last study we described them as ‘spiritual beings’. The objection to this is that it is not sufficiently definite, because ‘spiritual beings’ may be applied to any entity in the universe possessing, as all entities do, an intelligent spiritual center. Therefore, searching for a word, this — Gods — seemed best. Any other word would be as good, provided it conveyed the idea of the summit, physical, intellectual, and spiritual, of any hierarchy under discussion. The angelical order would be the second in the series, a step downward from the Gods. It would be, of course, perfectly proper to call them ‘gods one degree lower’; the daimones ‘gods two degrees lower’, the heroes three, men four, etc., and thus down to the end of the scale. But as that is confusing, and as it fixes an entity in the mind by giving it a name, let us call the next, the third in order, daimones, from the Greek word daimones which has many meanings and is used in Greek literature with many significations. Hesiod in his Works and Days (121), speaks of the daimones as being the entities of the first, golden, or Saturnian race of men [See also The Secret Doctrine, II, 765.– PLP EDS.] (which would fit in very well with what we understand by our Third Race in this Round), who exercise a protecting and beneficent care over men. The order of Heroes is lower, a word taken from Greek mythology, philosophy, and literature. Hesiod speaks of the Heroes as the representatives of his third race of men, formidable, mighty … hearts of adamant, unapproachable, which would also fit in admirably with our Third and early Fourth Races. Hesiod omits mention of our First Race; and his other races are made to overlap. The Heroes were greater men, supermen, as they might be called today. They were men such as Theseus was, and Hercules too. The Heroes in Greek mythology were conceived as of having a god for one parent and a human for the other parent. Men are such as we are, a strange mingling of god and beast, standing midway betwixt the gods and the elementals, and composing the middle point of the hierarchy. The Animals are lesser men, or super-plants, beings with everything latent in them which we have, beings which are following us as the world progresses, feeding on what we cast off. Our dead bodies nourish the plants. Our astral elements after our death, nourish the animals. The higher parts of the animals are nourished by those parts of the lower quaternary, the second part of man (conceived of as a heptad), which he casts off in the postmortem state. The plants are lesser animals. Sometimes the difference between plant and animal is small. There are creatures on earth today, principally marine, in which it is difficult to distinguish whether they are animal or plant. The Mineral world composes the hard and rocky substance from which plants, animals, and men, ultimately draw their subsistence And the Elementals form both the lowest order of this hierarchical scale — which you will remember is merely taken as an example of any hierarchical scale — and the commencement of another hierarchical scale below, another series of nine. They are the super-gods, so to say, of the lower scale, as the elementals of the hierarchy above the gods would be the super-gods of our hierarchy, superior to this as this is superior to the one below it. So much for the principles of the hierarchical governance of the universe. Now it was a part of the Neoplatonic technique, and it is also the technique of Theosophy, more particularly as set forth by H. P. Blavatsky in The Secret Doctrine, that every part of nature has its head. Nature is divided into spheres of activity, planes of action, ruled by deputies, who are the hierarchical heads thereof. This is also the teaching of Dionysius the Areopagite. Be it remembered, that his ideas are unsatisfactory from their vagueness, from the attempt to twist them to suit dogmatical Christian theology, and from the effort made to stretch them or to compress them into the proper size to fit that theology. But the principle is there, of dominance, of governance of the cosmos, of the universe, by deputies, receiving their power, their authority, their intelligence from the hierarchical head. In the Scandinavian Edda there are also the gods in their hierarchies. The eighth state or order in this scale is called Hel , that is to say the eighth of the hierarchy, lower or higher, as we view it than the one corresponding to this I have just written on the blackboard which we may call the human hierarchy, giving it the name of that which composes its center. [This statement is somewhat unclear, evidently referencing some scheme or diagram on the blackboard not incorporated in the original shorthand transcript. — PLP EDS.] The ninth state of this Scandinavian hierarchy was called Nifelheim. Now we come to an exceedingly difficult part of this subject, and that is, tracing the golden thread of consciousness and individuality running from the summit down. You will remember that Homer ( Iliad viii, 19-24) speaks of the golden chain, by which if necessary he could drag all the gods and goddesses up from below, or let them down from Olympus if he so pleased; and this passage in the divine Homer has exercised the minds of more Greek and Latin philosophers than any other. Its proper elucidation is found in the writings of the Neoplatonists. These Neo-Platonists were a wonderful body of men. The name Neo of course means ‘new’, and Platonists is a word indicating the source of their philosophy in Plato. And they said that as Plato hid his knowledge in metaphor and symbol, as all ancient teachers did, so their duty was (considering that the world had arrived at what was called among themselves a period of intellectual and spiritual barrenness when false ideas were abroad and spreading in the world) — their duty was to set forth as much as they dared of the real meaning of what Plato thought, more or less of the actual teachings taught in the Mysteries of Greece. And they did so, and they said that the ‘golden chain’ signified that procession of conscious being from the highest we can conceive of, down to the lowest. Every god had a procession or chain of entities proceeding from him to the lowest things. Along that magnetic chain, that golden chain, that series of links between the lowest and the highest, the particular characteristic or qualities of that particular god were always manifest. There was the Athentic, or Minervic which is the Latin term for the same thing, and this is the procession of intellectual entities. Their chain, down to the lowest, had an intellectual characteristic or nature. Those gods in which the passion of harmony, or love, (divine love, please understand) was the characteristic dominant, as in the celestial Venus, formed the chain connecting the celestial beings with the lowest of beings in which attraction below and love above predominated. You will remember that there were two Venuses, the celestial Venus, the divine Venus, called by the Greeks Aphrodite Ourania (from the Greek word meaning the heavens), and the Aphrodite Pandemos, of all people, as we might say, ‘everybody’s’ Venus. (Cf. Plato, Symposium, 81C). This Aphrodite Pandemos, was the Venus of animal desire, of animal love, animal attraction; and the Aphrodite Ourania, the celestial Aphrodite, was that power in the universe which is best represented by our human word harmony, or love, pure celestial, impersonal love. Therefore, consider if you please, that this hierarchy is removed seven degrees, seven stages above ours, leaving the relative positions of these nine orders as they now are. We may take fourteen stages or fifteen, or any number we may choose, but we will say seven above, counting upwards from the gods. From the gods of that seventh degree higher the influence proceeds mystically and wonderfully through all these others down to the ends of things. The second order of that degree sends forth in the same way, and the third and all the other. We are now men. What makes us men? It is the working in us of the intellectual faculties, the Manas, that which links us with the above and which enables us to understand the below. When we come to study Soul, Spirit, Matter, and Maya we shall be able to go into that subject more fully. Now it will be better to leave it, merely alluding to the fact that we are men because we receive as the source of our faculties, of our inspiration, the influence, the life, the magnetic stream so to speak, which descends from this particular hierarchy to which we belong. This composite stream was spoken of in ancient India under a dual form, as the solar and the lunar strains or inheritance, because man, mystically speaking, is part sun and part moon. These are difficult questions. We will go into them later when they come up. I am now trying to show you how hierarchies work in Nature, and you really see that the subject is so complex that I can give no more than the idea as thought by the ancients. That is my duty; it is the duty of those who wish to study, to investigate for themselves. H. P. Blavatsky taught us, all our Teachers have taught us, to take our literature, The Secret Doctrine pre-eminently, and by searching and reading such works as will enable us to advance step by step, to realize the grandeur of conceptions such as these: that the universe is conceived of as an organism, as being a unit; that there is no creation in the ordinary sense (we will come to that subject later also). There is evolution, emanation. Strictly speaking, we Theosophists are evolutionary emanationists. We are not evolutionists and we are not emanationists, in the popular sense, when we describe the tremendous activities which we class under the two names Cosmogony and Theogony. Therefore, each unit or order of any hierarchical system, giving its individuality, its life, its principles to all below it, and all below it aspiring towards it; each hierarchy in turn sending its principles, its life, its energy, its light, to those lower, and those lower aspiring to those higher — we can see what a majestic system it was which the ancients had, and how, despite themselves, these Christians with their arrogance and egotism find themselves drawn back to the old system, not knowing it. They cannot avoid it. It is in them. It is in the blood of men because they are men. Instinctively, they are drawn, as the magnet attracts them. All men are thinking beings, as a Greek philosopher said, and all heroes are aspiring beings, and all daimones are intellectual entities, and all angelical orders are orders of love. And the gods form the apex, those who are perfected. Little by little the elementals raise themselves into the minerals, the minerals through ages and ages of time become plants, the plants raise themselves in turn to the animals, the animals aspire to the heroes, the heroes are drawn to the animals and man is born! Heaven above, earth below, man in the middle; below earth the elemental world. It is a wonderful system, wonderful in the suggestiveness of every thought. Thoughts come into our minds as we discuss these things that we cannot follow, as we have not time, but you will see that in whatever way we look at these truths there is a new conception. Vaster horizons are opened to our view; new worlds seem to burst upon our astonished gaze. And how do we enter them? What is the key? It is Unity Divine, Universal Brotherhood, the identity of all things that are spiritual, where there is neither a beginning nor an end, because the end is a beginning and the beginning is an end. When the great Christian Teacher said: I am the Alpha and the Omega, by Alpha and Omega he meant that which is the beginning and the end — I am a hierarchy. And see how it has been twisted and turned as implying the personal, irascible, thundering God, the adopted God, the misunderstood Jewish Lord, the creator of heaven and earth, and no more. I and my Father are one. What is the Father of man? God, which is myself, yourself — and yet seven principles in each of us all, and seven principles to each order of any hierarchy, each principle with each principle interlinked, and forming an interminable chain from the lowest up to the very Godhead. And what is the Godhead? It is the elemental order of that which is higher. And we talk about ‘infinity’ and ‘eternity’ and quibble quite loosely, scarcely understanding what the words mean! I could say much more on this subject, but time passes. I would like to point out one thing. In the Christian New Testament, Paul, writing to the Romans supposedly, (XI, 36) says (and the English of it does not carry the force of the Greek): For of me and through me and to me are all things. ( of, derivation ; through , procession ; from, a source ; to , aspiration ). The Old Testament of the Jews has a remarkable passage. It says Let us make man in our image, according to our likeness. You will see the force of that in a few moments. The Hebrew of it is this: [[heb char]] N’AShH ADM BTsLMNV ChDMVThNV (Gen. I, 26) The word for man here is Adam . It is used for man in the sense that the Germans use Der Mensch, not Der Mann ; as the Latins used the word Homo, not Vir ; as the Greeks said anthropos, not aner . It means humanity, mankind, not a human pair, Adam and Eve. The poetic term for man in Hebrew was [[heb char]] (ANVSh) = Enoch. [G. de P. has Hebrew ANVSh, but English Enoch, which derives from Hebrew ChNVCh, Haunch. H. P. Blavatsky shows these terms to be equivalent. See Gen. iv, 17; v. 6, 19. ChNVCh had a life span of 365 years; ANVSh, by gematria, is 365 x 1 according to Skinner’s Source of Measures methodology. — J.D.] But in speaking of a man particularly, as one of the race, an individual man, the word [[heb char]] Ish, was used. For instance, a man said to a man: [[heb char]] AMR AISH LAISH. Man considered as a genus, as a class is [[heb char]] ADM Adam, commonly called Adam. Now, we find: — Let us make humanity in our image — so God created man in his own image. In the image of God created he him; male and female created he them. ( Genesis The point is this: God, ‘Elohim, created man in the image of God, ‘Elohim; man is a child of God, ‘Elohim; he is the image of his hierarchy, the image of his summit, the apex of the hierarchy. So careful were the writers of that verse that they repeated In the image of God ‘Elohim created he him; male and female created he them. Are we to understand that the Lord God of the Jews is shaped as a physical man is? In chapter V of Genesis there is this: — Male and female created he them and blessed them, and called their name Adam. Now I ask your attention to these things: they are not unimportant. We are told that the first man, according to the usual interpretation, was called Adam, and that the first woman was taken from a rib of his body. We are told in the fifth chapter that their name was Adam. We have just seen that Adam was the name of humanity, and that the name for man as an individual was [[heb char]] (pronounced Ish). What then is the inference? That humanity is spoken of, not a human pair; that as their name was Adam (called he ), and as his ‘wife’ is distinguished from that word by the word Eve, therefore that the nature of the mankind spoken of here was mystically dual — a humanity which became ages and ages later on actually a double-sex race — bisexual. Bisexual humanity on earth is symbolic of an equivalent participation of energies in the hierarchical order from which that bisexual race traced its source. (The Adam of the first chapter of Genesis , it should be remembered, is not a physical being — rather an ‘angel’, a semi-spiritual being of bi-polar nature. We shall come again to this in due time We see, then that in the Hebrew records early humanity (not the physical, fleshly being we know as man; there is no authority for that) was in the image of Elohim. Now Elohim is a very curious word. It is a plural; it comes from [[heb char]] (ALVH) Eloah, a ‘divine being’ or ‘god’, used sometimes as a word for the Deity. It would mean — reading it as a word and taking our minds away from theological misconceptions — the Gods . And the Gods said: Let us make humanity in our image, according to our pattern. The orthodox answer to that (and it is proper that we should have the other side before us) is that Elohim is used in the masculine plural as a plural of majesty, or dignity, much as an earthly monarch might say: We, by the grace of God, Edward, King of Great Britain and Ireland; we the king….Furthermore the argument is strengthened against what I have just said by the usage in this locus of the singular verb (in part only) and by the singular pronoun (in part, the plural also being used, ‘our’, ‘us’, ‘we’). But it is according to the genius of the ancient Hebrew that under certain conditions a plural noun may take a singular verb, very much as in Greek the neuter plural regularly takes a singular verb, as for instance [[greek char]] (ta panta esti agatha), literally, all things is good . A similar rule prevails in the Hebrew, that plurals sometimes take singular verbs, sometimes not. So the argument of the monotheists that Elohim is here only a plural of dignity, and besides that it takes a singular verb to designate the Deity, disappears. Furthermore, the sense in our image, our pattern, is very strong in Hebrew. It has more force than it has in the English. Both words, both expressions have a plural sense, and as we know that if we accept the orthodox interpretation, whether of the Jews or of the Christians, we must believe that man was made in the image of the formless Deity, that the Deity is the model of man, we are led into what seems to a theosophical mind utter blasphemy. But taking it in the sense of the plural as it stands, not necessarily as gods with the usual idea of a heterogeneous collection of squabbling divinities, but as a closely-knit order of hierarchy — In our likeness, in our copy — we see that being patterned after his archetype, man is a hierarchy; the gods are a hierarchy; the Elohim are any undefined hierarchy which you may choose to name. The Hebrew books speak of it, and Genesis starts off with the words as commonly rendered: In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth.
  • (TG) Hierogrammatists. The title given to those Egyptian priests, who were entrusted with the writing and reading of the sacred and secret records. The scribes of the secret records literally. They were the instructors of the neophytes preparing for initiation.
  • (KT) Hierogrammatists {Greek} The title given to those Egyptian priests who were entrusted with the writing and reading of the sacred and secret records. The scribes of the secret records literally. They were the instructors of the neophytes preparing for initiation.
  • (TG) Hierophant. From the Greek Hierophantes; literally, One who explains sacred things. The discloser of sacred learning, and the Chief of the Initiates. A title belonging to the highest Adepts in the temples of antiquity, who were the teachers and expounders of the Mysteries and the Initiators into the final great Mysteries. The Hierophant represented the Demiurge, and explained to the postulants for Initiation the various phenomena of Creation that were produced for their tuition. He was the sole expounder of the esoteric secrets and doctrines. It was forbidden even to pronounce his name before an uninitiated person. He sat in the East, and wore as a symbol of authority a golden globe suspended from the neck. He was also called Mystagogus (Kenneth R. H. Mackenzie, ix., F.T.S., in The Royal Cyclopaedia). In Hebrew and Chaldaic the term was Peter, the opener, discloser; hence the Pope as the successor of the hierophant of the ancient Mysteries, sits in the Pagan chair of St. Peter.
  • (IU) Hierophant. — Discloser of sacred learning. The Old Man, the Chief of the Adepts at the initiations, who explained the arcane knowledge to the neophytes, bore this title. In Hebrew and Chaldaic the term was Peter, or opener, discloser; hence, the Pope, as the successor of the hierophant of the ancient Mysteries, sits in the Pagan chair of St. Peter. The vindictiveness of the Catholic Church toward the alchemists, and to arcane and astronomical science, is explained by the fact that such knowledge was the ancient prerogative of the hierophant, or representative of Peter, who kept the mysteries of life and death. Men like Bruno, Galileo, and Kepler, therefore, and even Cagliostro, trespassed on the preserves of the Church, and were accordingly murdered.
  • Every nation had its Mysteries and hierophants. Even the Jews had their Peter — Tanaim or Rabbin, like Hillel, Akiba, [Akiba was a friend of Aher, said to have been the Apostle Paul of Christian story. Both are depicted as having visited Paradise. Aher took branches from the Tree of Knowledge, and so fell from the true (Jewish) religion. Akiba came away in peace. See 2d Epistle to the Corinthians, chapter xii.] and other famous kabalists, who alone could impart the awful knowledge contained in the Merkaba . In India, there was in ancient times one, and now there are several hierophants scattered about the country, attached to the principal pagodas, who are known as the Brahma-atmas. In Thibet the chief hierophant is the Dalay or Taley-Lama of Lha-ssa. [Taley means ocean or sea.] Among Christian nations, the Catholics alone have preserved this heathen custom, in the person of their Pope, albeit they have sadly disfigured its majesty and the dignity of the sacred office.
  • (KT) Hierophant. From the Greek Hierophantes, literally he who explains sacred things; a title belonging to the highest adepts in the temples of antiquity, who were the teachers and expounders of the Mysteries, and the Initiators into the final great Mysteries. The Hierophant stood for the Demiurge, and explained to the postulants for Initiation the various phenomena of creation that were produced for their tuition. He was the sole expounder of the exoteric secrets and doctrines. It was forbidden even to pronounce his name before an uninitiated person. He sat in the East, and wore as symbol of authority, a golden globe, suspended from the neck. He was also called Mystagogus
  • (FY) Hierophants, the High Priests.
  • (WG) Hierophant #6nn, an instructor in the Mysteries, an initiator. (Greek hieros , sacred; phantes, one who shows
  • (WG) Higher Ego, Buddhi-Manas . The spiritual part of the human ego. The god within us, or our Father in Heaven.
  • (TG) Higher Self. The Supreme Divine Spirit overshadowing man. The crown of the upper spiritual Triad in man — Atman .
  • (WG) Higher Self, Atma. The spiritual essence in man. The supreme Soul, the divine Monad, overshadowing the human Ego.
  • (OG) Higher Triad — The imperishable spiritual ego considered as a unity. It is the reincarnating part of man’s constitution which clothes itself in each earth-life in a new personality or lower quaternary. The higher triad, speaking in the simplest fashion, is the unity of atman, buddhi, and the higher manas; and the lower quaternary consists of the lower manas or kama-manas, the prana or vitality, the linga-sarira or astral model-body, and the physical vehicle.
  • Another manner of considering the human constitution in its spiritual aspects is that viewed from the standpoint of consciousness, and in this latter manner the higher triad consists of the divine monad, the spiritual monad, and the higher human monad. The higher triad is often spoken of in a collective sense, and ignoring details of division, as simply the reincarnating monad, or more commonly the reincarnating ego, because this latter is rooted in the higher triad.
  • Many theosophists experience quite unnecessary difficulty in understanding why the human constitution should be at one time divided in one way and at another time divided in another way. The difficulty lies in considering these divisions as being absolute instead of relative, in other words, as representing watertight compartments instead of merely indefinite and convenient divisions. The simplest psychological division is probably that which divides the septenary constitution of man in three parts: an uppermost duad which is immortal, an intermediate duad which is conditionally immortal, and a lower triad which is unconditionally mortal. (See Fundamentals of the Esoteric Philosophy, 1st ed., pp. 167, 525; 2nd rev. ed., pp. 199, 601).
  • (TG) Hillel. A great Babylonian Rabbi of the century preceding the Christian era. He was the founder of the sect of the Pharisees, a learned and a sainted man.
  • (KT) Hillel. A great Babylonian Rabbi of the century preceding the Christian Era. He was the founder of the sect of the Pharisees, a learned and a saintly man.
  • (TG) Himachala Himadri {Sans}. The Himalayan Mountains.
  • (GH) Himalaya The lofty range of mountains in central Asia. Also known as Himachala and Himadri and personified as Himavat, mythologically considered to be the husband of Mena and the father of Ganga (the Ganges river). ( Bhagavad-Gita , W. Q. Judge, p. 74)
  • (TG) Himavt {Sans}. The personified Himalayas; the father of the river Ganga, or Ganges.
  • (TG) Hinayana {Sans}. The Smaller Vehicle; a Scripture and a School of the Northern Buddhists, opposed to the Mahayana, the Greater Vehicle, in Tibet. Both schools are mystical. (See Mahayana Also in exoteric superstition the lowest form of transmigration.
  • (KT) Hinayana {Sans} The Smaller Vehicle; a Scripture and a School of the Buddhists, contrasted with the Mahayana, The Greater Vehicle. Both schools are mystical. (See Mahayana Also in exoteric superstition, the lowest form of transmigration.
  • (FY) Hina-yana, lowest form of transmigration of the Buddhist.
  • (WG) Hina-yana, the inferior or lesser vehicle, a system of Buddhistic teaching. (See Maha-yana
  • (WG) Hindu, a Hindoo; the name of the religion of the Hindus.
  • (FY) Hiong-Thsang, the celebrated Chinese traveler whose writings contain the most interesting account of India of the period.
  • (TG) Hiouen Thsang. A great Chinese writer and philosopher who travelled in India in the sixth century, in order to learn more about Buddhism, to which he was devoted.
  • HIPPOCRATES
  • Oath and Law of Hippocrates
  • (TG) Hippocrates {Greek}. A famous physician of Cos, one of the Cyclades, who flourished at Athens during the invasion of Artaxerxes, and delivered that town from a dreadful pestilence. He was called the father of Medicine. Having studied his art from the votive tablets offered by the cured patients at the temples of Aesculapius, he became an Initiate and the most proficient healer of his day, so much so that he was almost deified. His learning and knowledge were enormous. Galen says of his writing that they are truly the voice of an oracle. He died in his 100th year, 361 B.C.
  • (TG) Hippopotamus {Greek}. In Egyptian symbolism Typhon was called the hippopotamus who slew his father and violated his mother, Rhea (mother of the gods). His father was Chronos. As applied therefore to Time and Nature (Chronos and Rhea), the accusation becomes comprehensible. The type of Cosmic Disharmony, Typhon, who is also Python, the monster formed of the slime of the Deluge of Deucalion, Violates his mother, Primordial Harmony, whose beneficence was so great that she was called The Mother of the Golden Age. It was Typhon, who put an end to the latter, i.e ., produced the first war of the elements.
  • (TG) Hiquet {Egyp}. The frog-goddess; one of the symbols of immortality and of the Water principle. The early Christians had their church lamps made in the form of a frog, to denote that baptism in water led to immortality.
  • (TG) Hiram Abiff. A biblical personage; a skilful builder and a Widow’s Son, whom King Solomon procured from Tyre, for the purpose of superintending the works of the Temple, and who became later a masonic character, the hero on whom hangs all the drama, or rather play , of the Masonic Third Initiation . The Kabbala makes a great deal of Hiram Abiff.
  • (TG) Hiranya {Sans}. Radiant, golden, used of the Egg of Brahma.
  • (TG) Hiranya Garbha {Sans}. The radiant or golden egg or womb. Esoterically the luminous fire mist or ethereal stuff from which the Universe was formed.
  • (WG) Hiranya-Garbha, a name of Brahma, the creator, said to have been born from a golden egg which was formed out of the seed deposited by the self-existent Brahma in the waters; a symbol for universal abstract nature. ( hiranya , golden; garbha, the conceiving womb, the fruit of the womb: gold-scion, or fruit of the golden [egg]
  • (SKs) Hiranyagarbha Literally ‘the Golden Egg’ or ‘the Egg of imperishable matter,’ the ‘Auric Egg’ of a universe, a solar system, a planet, a god, or a human being. Hiranyagarbha is a compound of hiranya — golden, and garbha — womb. Legend, which is verily history of the hoary past, says that Brahman, the Universal Divinity, cast a seed into the Waters of Space. From this seed, which became Hiranyagarbha or a golden egg which shone like unto the sun, was born Brahma, the Solar Self. The Auric Egg of any being is that radiant sphere which is the source of the being on all planes. In an article on the Auric Egg to appear in the forthcoming Encyclopedic Glossary, Dr. de Purucker writes about the Auric Egg of a human being in the following words: It ranges from the divine to the astral-physical, and is the seat of all the monadic, spiritual, intellectual, mental, passional, and vital energies and faculties of the human septiform constitution. In its essence it is eternal, and endures throughout the Pralayas as well as during the Manvantaras; but necessarily in greatly varying fashion in these two great periods of Kosmic Life.
  • (IN) The Complete Works, H. P. Blavatsky writes that the word Hiranya does not mean gold but the golden light of divine knowledge, the first principle in whose womb is contained the light of the eternal truth which illuminates the liberated soul when it has reached its highest abode. It is, in short, the Philosopher’s Stone of the alchemist, and the Eternal Light of the Fire Philosopher. — II, p. 76
  • (TG) Hiranyakasipu {Sans}. A King of the Daityas, whom Vishnu — in his avatar of the man-lion — puts to death.
  • (TG) Hiranyaksha {Sans}. The golden-eyed. The king and ruler of the 5th region of Patala, the nether-world; a snake-god in the Hindu Pantheon. It has various other meanings.
  • (TG) Hiranyapura {Sans}. The Golden City.
  • (TG) Hisi #fin. The Principle of Evil in the Kalevala, the epic poem of Finland.
  • (TG) Hitopadesa {Sans}. Good Advice. A work composed of a collection of ethical precepts, allegories and other tales from an old, Scripture, the Panchatantra.
  • (TG) Chivim {Hebr}.
  • (TG) Hivim {Hebr}. Whence the Hivites who, according to some Roman Catholic commentators, descend from Heth, son of Canaan, son of Ham, the accursed. Brasseuir de Bourbourg, the missionary translator of the Scripture of the Guatemalans, the Popol Vuh, indulges in tile theory that the Hivim of the Qutetzo Cohuatl, the, Mexican Serpent Deity, and the descendants of Serpents as they call themselves, are identical with the descendants of Ham (!!) whose ancestor is Cain. Such is the conclusion, at any rate, drawn from Bombourg’s writings by Des Mousseaux, the demonologist. Bourbourg hints that the chiefs of the name of Votan, the Quetzo Cohuatl, are the descendants of Ham and Canaan. I and Hivim, they say. Being a Hivim, I am of the great Race of the Dragons. I am a snake, myself, for I am a Hivim ( Cortes 51). But Cain is allegorically shown as the ancestor of the Hivites, the Serpents, because Cain is held to have been the first initiate in the mysteries of procreation. The race of the Dragons or Serpents means the Wise Adepts. The names Hivi or Hivite, and Levi — signify a Serpent; and the Hivites or Serpent-tribe of Palestine, were, like all Levites and Ophites of Israel, initiated Ministers to the temples, i.e ., Occultists, as are the priests of Quetzo Cohuatl. The Gibeonites whom Joshua assigned to the service of the sanctuary were Hivites
  • (TG) Hler {Nors}. The god of the sea. One of the three mighty sons of the Frost-giant, Ymir. These sons were Karl, god of the air and the storms; Hler of the Sea; and Logi of the fire. They are the Cosmic trinity of the Norsemen.
  • (TG) Hoa {Hebr}. That, from which proceeds Ab, the Father; therefore the Concealed Logos.
  • (TG) Hoang Ty {Chin}. The Great Spirit. His Sons are said to have acquired new wisdom, and imparted what they knew before to mortals, by falling — like the rebellious angels — into the Valley of Pain, which is allegorically our Earth. In other words they are identical with the Fallen Angels of exoteric religions, and with the reincarnating Egos, esoterically.
  • (TG) Hochmah {Hebr}. See Chochmah.
  • (TG) Hod {Hebr}. Splendour, the eighth of the ten Sephiroth, a female passive potency. [w.w.w.]
  • (WG) Hod {Hebr}, splendor. The eighth of the ten Sephiroth of the Kabalah. A female potency.
  • (MO) Hoder {Nors} (heu-der) [ hod war, slaughter] An Ase: blind god of darkness and ignorance; brother of Balder
  • (TG) Holy of Holies. The Assyriologists, Egyptologists, and Orientalists, in general, show that such a place existed in every temple of antiquity. The great temple of Bel-Merodach whose sides faced the four cardinal points, had in its extreme end a Holy of Holies hidden from the profane by a veil: here, at the beginning of the year ‘the divine, king of heaven and earth, the lord of the heavens, seats himself’. According to Herodotus, here was the golden image of the god with a golden table in front like the Hebrew table for the shew bread, and upon this, food appears to have been placed. In some temples there also was a little coffer or ark with two engraved stone tablets on it. (Myer’s Qabbalah In short, it is now pretty well proven, that the chosen people had nothing original of their own, but that every detail of their ritualism and religion was borrowed from older nations. The Hibbert Lectures by Prof. Sayce and others show this abundantly. The story of the birth of Moses is that of Sargon, the Babylonian, who preceded Moses by a couple of thousand years; and no wonder, as Dr. Sayce tells us that the name of Moses, Mosheh, has a connection with the name of the Babylonian sun-god as the hero or leader. (Hibvert Lect. p. 4 et Says Mr. J Myer, The orders of the priests were divided into high priests, those attached or bound to certain deities, like the Hebrew Levites; anointers or cleaners; the Kali , ‘illustrious’ or ‘elders’; the soothsayers, and the Makhkhu or ‘great one’ in which Prof. Delitzsch sees the Rab-mag of the Old Testament. The Akkadians and Chaldeans kept a Sabbath day of rest every seven days, they also had thanksgiving days, and days for humiliation and prayer. There were sacrifices of vegetables and animals, of meats and wine. . . . The number seven was especially sacred. . . . The great temple of Babylon existed before 2,250 B.C. Its ‘Holy of Holies’ was within the Shrine of Nebo, the prophet god of wisdom. It is from the Akkadians that the god Mardak passed to the Assyrians, and he had been before Merodach, the merciful, of the Babylonians, the only son and interpreter of the will of Ea or Hea, the great Deity of Wisdom. The Assyriologists have, in short, unveiled the whole scheme of the chosen people .
  • (WG) Holy Triad, in Buddhism, the Lord (Buddha), the Law, and the Assembly.
  • (TG) Holy Water. This is one of the oldest rites practised in Egypt, and thence in Pagan Rome. It accompanied the rite of bread and wine. Holy water was sprinkled by the Egyptian priest alike upon his gods’ images and the faithful. It was both poured and sprinkled. A brush has been found, supposed to have been used for that purpose, as at this day As to the bread, the cakes of Isis . . . were placed upon the alter. Gliddon writes that they were ‘identical in shape with the consecrated cake of the Roman and Eastern Churches’. Melville assures us ‘the Egyptians marked this holy bread with St. Andrew’s cross’. The Presence bread was broken before being distributed by the priests to the people, and was supposed to become the flesh and blood of the Deity. The miracle was wrought by the hand of the officiating priest, who blessed the food. . . . Rouge tells us ‘the bread offerings bear the imprint of the fingers , the mark of consecration See also Bread and Wine
  • (TG) Homogeneity. From the Greek words homos the same and genos kind. That which is of the same nature throughout, undifferentiated, non-compound, as gold is supposed to be.
  • (KT) Homogeneity. From the Greek words homos, the same; and genos, kind. That which is of the same nature throughout, undifferentiated, non-compound, as gold is supposed to be.
  • (TG) Honir {Nors}. A creative god who furnished the first man with intellect and understanding after man had been created by him jointly with Odin and Lodur from an ash tree.
  • (MO) Honer {Nors} (heu-ner) One of the creative trinity; the watery principle
  • (TG) Honover (Zend). The Persian Logos, the manifested Word.
  • (TG) Hor Ammon {Egyp}. The Self-engendered, a word in theogony which answers to the Sanskrit Anupadaka, parentless. Hor-Ammon is a combination of the ram-headed god of Thebes and of Horus.
  • (PV) Hor chan Head of the serpent. The Chorti Maya caste of elder-chiefs, equated with Gucumatz, the Agrarian deity of which they are the earthly representatives. This elder caste is of divine origin, but the individual born into it must win the right to exercise of the post through his or her personal merit and exemplary conduct.
  • (TG) Horchia {Chald}. According to Berosus, the same as Vesta, goddess of the Hearth.
  • (TG) Horus {Egyp}. The last in the line of divine Sovereigns in Egypt, said to he the son of Osiris and Isis. He is the great god loved of Heaven, the beloved of the Sun, the offspring of the gods, the subjugator of the world. At the time of the Winter Solstice (our Christmas), his image, in the form of a small newly-born infant, was brought out from the sanctuary for the adoration of the worshipping, crowds. As he is, the type of the vault of heaven, he is said to have come from the Maem Misi, the sacred birth-place (the womb of the World), and is, therefore, the mystic Child of the Ark or the argha, the symbol of the matrix. Cosmically, he is the Winter Sun. A tablet describes him as the substance of his father, Osiris, of whom he is an incarnation and also identical with him. Horus is a chaste deity, and like Apollo has no amours. His part in the lower world is associated with the Judgment. He introduces souls to his father, the Judge (Bonwick). An ancient hymn says of him, By him the world is judged in that which it contains. Heaven and earth are under his immediate presence. He rules all human beings. The sun goes round according to his purpose. He brings forth abundance and dispenses it to all the earth. Every one adores his beauty. Sweet is his love in us.
  • (WG) Horus, the son of Osiris and Isis, the Father and Mother, or spiritual and material aspects of Being, in Egyptian mysticism. Therefore he is the fount of life, the germ, the mystic child of the ark; that out of which the whole universe grows or becomes.
  • (MO) Hostage {Nors} A Vana god among the Aesir: an avatara from a higher to a lower world
  • (TG) Hotri {Sans}. A priest who recites the hymns from the Rig Veda , and makes oblations to the fire.
  • (WG) Hotri, a priest conversant with the Rig-Veda; an offerer of sacrifices with fire.
  • (TG) Hotris {Sans}. A symbolical name for the seven senses called, in the Anugita the Seven Priests. The senses supply the fire of mind ( i.e ., desire) with the oblations of external pleasures. An occult term used metaphysically.
  • (VS) Householder (II 11) [[p. 28]] Rathapala the great Arhat thus addresses his father in the legend called Rathapala Sutrasanne . But as all such legends are allegorical ( e.g. Rathapala’s father has a mansion with seven doors ) hence the reproof, to those who accept them literally .
  • Hrida tashtan mantran Mantras carved by the heart
  • (WG) Hridaya, the heart; the center or essence of anything; divine knowledge.
  • (TG) Hrimthurses {Nors}. The Frost-giants; Cyclopean builders in the Edda.
  • (WG) Hrishikesha, lord of the organs of sense, or the faculties. ( hrishika, any organ of sense, or indriya ; isa , master, ruler. (See Indriyatman
  • (GH) Hrishikesa A name applied to Krishna and to Vishnu. (Meaning of the word itself: lord of the senses. Bhagavad-Gita , W. Q. Judge, p. 84)
  • (MO) Hugin {Nors} (hoog-in) [ bug mind] One of Odin’s two ravens
  • (TG) Humanity. Occultly and Kabbalistically, the whole of mankind is symbolised, by Manu in India; by Vajrasattva or Dorjesempa, the head of the Seven Dhyani, in Northern Buddhism; and by Adam Kadmon in the Kabbala. All these represent the totality of mankind whose beginning is in this androgynic protoplast, and whose end is in the Absolute , beyond all these symbols and myths of human origin. Humanity is a great Brotherhood by virtue of the sameness of the material from which it is formed physically and morally. Unless, however, it becomes a Brotherhood also intellectually, it is no better than a superior genus of animals.
  • (OG) Human Ego — The human ego is seated in that part of the human constitution which theosophists call the intermediate duad, manas-kama. The part which is attracted below and is mortal is the lower human ego. The part which aspires upwards towards the buddhi and ultimately joins it is the higher human ego or reincarnating ego. The dregs of the human ego after the death of the human being and after the second death in the kama-loka, remain in the astral spheres as the disintegrating kama-rupa or spook.
  • (OG) Human Monad — In theosophical terminology the human monad is that part of man’s constitution which is the root of the human ego. After death it allies itself with the upper duad, atma-buddhi, and its inclusion within the bosom of the upper duad produces the source whence issues the Reincarnating Ego at its next rebirth. The monad per se is an upper duad alone, but the attributive adjective human is given to it on account of the reincarnating ego which it contains within itself after death. This last usage is rather popular and convenient than strictly accurate.
  • (OG) Human Soul — The human soul, speaking generally, is the intermediate nature of man’s constitution, and being an imperfect thing it is drawn back into incarnation on earth where it learns needed lessons in this sphere of the universal life.
  • Another term for the human soul is the ego — a usage more popular than accurate, because the human ego is the soul of the human soul so to speak, the human soul being its vehicle. The ego is that which says in each one of us, I am I , not you ! It is the child of the immanent Self; and through its imprisonment in matter as a ray of the overruling immanent Self, it learns to reflect its consciousness back upon itself, thus obtaining cognition of itself as self-conscious and hetero-conscious, i.e., knowing itself, and knowing non-self or other selves.
  • Just as our higher and highest nature work through this human soul or intermediate nature of us, so does this last in its turn work and function through bodies or vehicles or sheaths of more or less etherealized matters which surround and enclose it, which are of course still lower than itself, and which therefore give it the means of contacting our own lower and lowest planes of matter; and these lower planes provide us with the vital-astral-physical parts of us. This human soul or intermediate nature manifests therefore as best it can through and by the astral-physical vehicle, the latter our body of human flesh.
  • (IN) the theosophical classification, the human soul is divided into the higher human soul, composed of the lower buddhi and the higher manas — and the self corresponding to it is the bhutatman, meaning the self of that which has been or the reincarnating ego — and the lower human soul, the lower manas and kama, and the self corresponding to it is pranatman or astral personal ego, which is mortal.
  • (PV) Hunab ku The Supreme Being of the Maya, also called Hun Itzamna. Equated with the Quiche’s Cabahuil, the god-Seven of the Popol Vuh.
  • (PV) Hunahpu {quiche-maya} One Blowgunner. The Quiche name of the Maya savior deity that incarnates to enlighten mankind and show the way to divinity; born immaculately at dawn on the winter solstice. With Ixbalamque, the civilizing hero of Quiche-Maya culture; god-Five, the young Solar and Maize god, in Chorti imagery symbolized by a cross (four points plus the central point); son of the Supreme Being, and alter ego of Hunrakan. A hypostasis of the Agrarian deity (god-Seven); as the young Maize god, is born from the foot of Cabahuil in the bowels of the earth. A twin of Ixbalamque, grandchild of Ixpiyacoc and Ixmucane. God B of the Maya codices; god of Dawn; compared with Osiris; symbol of chronological unity; apotheosized with Ixbalamque at the end of the Third Age in the Popol Vuh; the Fourth Regent or Ahau; god of the Woods; one of his zoological nahuals is the fish.
  • (PV) Hun Batz {quiche-maya} One Big Monkey. A son of one of the Seven Ahpu, he is a hero and great sage, singer, orator, engraver, sculptor, etc., of the Third Age of the Popol Vuh. A cousin or older brother of Hunahpu and Ixbalamque and Regent of the Third Age. Together with his brother, Hun Chouen, transformed into a monkey at the end of the Third Age. The monkeys of the forests are the only record of his existence.
  • (PV) Hun Chouen {quiche-maya} One Monkey. Like his brother Hun Batz, a son of one of the Seven Ahpu and sage and hero of the Third Age, sharing its regency. Transformed into a monkey with Hun Batz at the end of their regency, or the Third Age.
  • (TG) Hun-desa {Sans}. The country around lake Mansaravara in Tibet.
  • (PV) Hunrakan {quiche-maya} He of the single foot. A variant of Cabahuil, having a precise functional meaning. A nahual of Hunahpu and Ixbalamque. Identified with the constellation Ursa Major.
  • (TG) Hvanuatha {Avesta} name of the earth on which we live. One of the seven Karshvare (Earths), spoken of in Orma Ahr . (See Introduction to the Vendidad by Prof. Darmsteter
  • (MO) Hvergalmer {Nors} (vayr-yell-mer) [ hverr caldron] Source of the rivers of lives. It rises in Niflheim and waters one root of the Tree of Life
  • (TG) Hwergelmir {Nors}. A roaring cauldron wherein the souls of the evil doers perish.
  • (TG) Hwun {Chin}. Spirit. The same as Atman.
  • (FY) Hwun, spirit; the seventh principle in man ( Chinese ).
  • (TG) Hydranos {Greek}. Lit. , the Baptist. A name of the ancient Hierophant of the Mysteries who made the candidate pass through the trial by water, wherein he was plunged thrice. This was his baptism by the Holy Spirit which moves on the waters of Space. Paul refers to St. John as Hydranos, the Baptist. The Christian Church took this rite from the ritualism of the Eleusinian and other Mysteries.
  • (TG) Hyksos {Egyp}. The mysterious nomads, the Shepherds, who invaded Egypt at a period unknown and far anteceding the days of Moses. They are called the Shepherd Kings.
  • (TG) Hyle {Greek}. Primordial stuff or matter; esoterically the homogeneous sediment of Chaos or the Great Deep. The first principle out of which the objective Universe was formed.
  • (MO) Hymer {Nors} (hee-mer) The first titan of a life cycle. See Rymer
  • (TG) Hypatia {Greek}. The girl-philosopher, who lived at Alexandria during the fifth century, and taught many a famous man — among others Bishop Synesius. She was the daughter of the mathematician Theon, and became famous for her learning. Falling a martyr to the fiendish conspiracy of Theophilos, Bishop of Alexandria, and his nephew Cyril, she was foully murdered by their order. With her death fell the Neo-Platonic School.
  • (TG) Hyperborean {Greek}. The regions around the North Pole in the Arctic Circle.
  • (WG) Hyperborean, the regions round the North Pole comprised within the Arctic Circle. The land of the Second Race.
  • (TG) Hypnotism {Greek}. A name given by Dr. Braid to various processes by which one person of strong will-power plunges another of weaker mind into a kind of trance; once in such a state the latter will do anything suggested to him by the hypnotiser. Unless produced for beneficial purposes, Occultists would call it black magic or Sorcery. It is the most dangerous of practices, morally and physically, as it interferes with the nerve fluid and the nerves controlling the circulation in the capillary blood-vessels.
  • (KT) Hypnotism {Greek} A name given by Dr. Braid to the process by which one man of strong will-power plunges another of weaker mind into a kind of trance; once in such a state the latter will do anything suggested to him by the hypnotiser. Unless produced for beneficial purposes, the Occultists would call it black magic or sorcery. It is the most dangerous of practices, morally and physically, as it interferes with the nerve fluids.
  • (OG) Hypnotism — Derived from a Greek word hypnos, which means sleep, and strictly speaking the word hypnotism should be used only for those psychological-physiological phenomena in which the subject manifesting them is in a condition closely resembling sleep. The trouble is that in any attempt to study these various psychological powers of the human constitution it is found that they are many and of divers kinds; but the public, and even the technical experimenters, usually group all these psychological phenomena under the one word hypnotism, and therefore it is a misnomer. One of such powers, for instance, which is well known, is called fascination. Another shows a more or less complete suspension of the individual will and of the individual activities of him who is the sufferer from such psychological power, although in other respects he may show no signs of physical sleep. Another again — and this perhaps is the most important of all so far as actual dangers lie — passes under the name of suggestion, an exceedingly good name, because it describes the field of action of perhaps the most subtle and dangerous side-branch of the exercise of the general power or force emanating from the mind of the operator.
  • The whole foundation upon which this power rests lies in the human psychological constitution; and it can be easily and neatly expressed in a few words. It is the power emanating from one mind, which can affect another mind and direct or misdirect the latter’s course of action. This is in nine hundred and ninety-nine times out of a thousand a wrong thing to do; and this fact would readily be understood by everybody did men know, as they should, the difference between the higher and the lower nature of man, the difference between his incorruptible, death-defying individuality, his spiritual nature, on the one hand; and, on the other hand, the brain-mind and all its train of weak and fugitive thoughts.
  • Anyone who has seen men and women in the state of hypnosis must realize not only how dangerous, how baleful and wrong it is, but also that it exemplifies the trance state perfectly. The reason is that the intermediate nature, or the psychomental apparatus, of the human being in this state has been displaced from its seat, in other words, is disjoined or dislocated; and there remains but the vitalized human body, with its more or less imperfect functioning of the brain cells and nervous apparatus. H. P. Blavatsky in her Theosophical Glossary writes: It is the most dangerous of practices, morally and physically, as it interferes with the nerve-fluid and the nerves controlling the circulation in the capillary blood-vessels. ( See also Mesmerism)
  • (TG) Hypocephalus {Greek}. A kind of a pillow for the head of the mummy. They are of various kinds, e.g ., of stone, wood, etc., and very often of circular disks of linen covered with cement, and inscribed with magic figures and letters. They are called rest for the dead in the Ritual, and every mummy-coffin has one.
  • (TG) I. — The ninth letter in the English, the tenth in the Hebrew alphabet. As a numeral signifies, in both languages one, and also ten in the Hebrew (see J), in which it corresponds to the Divine name Jah, the male side, or aspect, of the hermaphrodite being, or the male-female Adam, of which hovah (Jah-hovah) is the female aspect. It is symbolized by a hand with bent forefinger, to show its phallic signification.
  • (TG) Iacchos {Greek}. A synonym of Bacchus. Mythology mentions three persons so named: they were Greek ideals adopted later by the Romans. The word Iacchos is stated to be of Phoenician origin, and to mean “an infant at the breast”. Many ancient monuments represent Ceres or Demeter with Bacchus in her arms. One Iacchos was called Theban and Conqueror, son of Jupiter and Semele; his mother died before his birth and he was preserved for some time in the thigh of his father; he was killed by the Titans. Another was son of Jupiter, as a Dragon, and Persephone; this one was named Zagraeus. A third was Iacchos of Eleusis, son of Ceres: he is of importance because he, appeared on the sixth day of the Eleusinian Mysteries. Some see an analogy between Bacchus and Noah, both cultivators of the Vine, and patrons of alcoholic excess. [w.w.w.]
  • (TG) Iachus {Greek}. An Egyptian physician, whose memory, according to Aelian, was venerated for long centuries, on account of his wonderful occult knowledge. Iachus is credited with having stopped epidemics simply by certain fumigations, and cured diseases by making his patients inhale herbs.
  • (TG) Iaho. Though this name is more fully treated under the word “Yaho” and “Iao”, a few words of explanation will not be found amiss. Diodorus mentions that the God of Moses was Iao; but as the latter name denotes a “mystery god”, it cannot therefore be confused with Iaho or Yaho . The Samaritans pronounced it Iabe, Yahva, and the Jews Yaho, and then Jehovah, by change of Masoretic vowels, an elastic scheme by which any change may be indulged in. But “Jehovah” is a later invention and invocation, as originally the name was Jah, or Iacchos (Bacchus). Aristotle shows the ancient Arabs representing Iach (Iacchos) by a horse, i.e., the horse of the Sun (Dionysus), which followed the chariot on Israeli Ahura Mazda, the god of the Heavens, daily rode.
  • (TG) Iamblichus {Greek}. A great Theurgist, mystic, a nd writer of the third and fourth centuries, a Neo-Platonist and philosopher, born at Chalcis in Coele-Syria. Correct biographies of him have never existed because of the hatred of the Christians; but that which has been gathered of his life in isolated fragments from works by impartial pagan and independent writers shows how excellent and holy was his moral character, and how great his learning. He may be called the founder of theurgic magic among the Neo-Platonists and the reviver of the practical mysteries outside of temple or fane. His school was at first distinct from that of Plotinus and Porphyry, who were strongly against ceremonial magic and practical theurgy as dangerous, though later he convinced Porphyry of its advisability on some occasions, and both master and pupil firmly believed in theurgy and magic, of which the former is principally the highest and most efficient mode of communication with one’s Higher Ego, through the medium of one’s astral body. Theurgic is benevolent magic, and it becomes goetic, or dark and evil, only when it is used for necromancy or selfish purposes; but such dark magic has never been practised by any theurgist or philosopher, whose name has descended to us unspotted by any evil deed. So much was Porphyry (who became the teacher of Iamblichus in Neo-Platonic philosophy) convinced of this, that though he, himself never practised theurgy, yet he gave instructions for the acquirement of this sacred science. Thus he says in one of his writings, “Whosoever is acquainted with the nature of divinely luminous appearances (phasmata) knows also on what account it is requisite to abstain from all birds (and animal food) and especially for him who hastens to be liberated from terrestrial concerns and to be established with the celestial gods”. (See Select Works by T. Taylor, p. 159 Moreover, the same Porphyry mentions in his Life of Plotinus a priest of Egypt, who, “at the request of a certain friend of Plotinus, exhibited to him, in the temple of Isis at Rome, the familiar daimon of that philosopher”. In other words, he produced the theurgic invocation (see “Theurgist “) by which Egyptian Hierophant or Indian Mahatma, of old, could clothe their own or any other person’s astral double with the appearance of its Higher Ego, or what Bulwer Lytton terms the “Luminous Self”, the Augoeides, and confabulate with It. This it is which Iamblichus and many others, including the mediaeval Rosicrucians, meant by union with Deity. Iamblichus wrote many books but only a few of his works are extant, such as his “Egyptian Mysteries” and a treatise “On Daemons”, in which he speaks very severely against any intercourse with them. He was a biographer of Pythagoras and deeply versed in the system of the latter, and was also learned in the Chaldean Mysteries. He taught that the One, or universal MONAD, was the principle of all unity as well as diversity, or of Homogeneity and Heterogeneity; that the Duad, or two (“Principles”), was the intellect, or that which we call Buddhi-Manas; three, was the Soul (the lower Manas), etc., etc. There is much of the theosophical in his teachings, and his works on the various kinds of daemons (Elementals) are a well of esoteric knowledge for the Student. His austerities, purity of life and earnestness were great. Iamblichus is credited with having been once levitated ten cubits high from the ground, as are some of the modern Yogis, and even great mediums.
  • (KT) Iamblichus. A great Theosophist and an Initiate of the third century. He wrote a great deal about the various kinds of demons who appear through evocation, but spoke severely against such phenomena. His austerities, purity of life and earnestness were great. He is credited with having been levitated ten cubits high from the ground, as are some modern Yogis, and mediums.
  • (TG) Iao {Greek}. See Iaho. The highest god of the Phoenicians — “the light conceivable only by intellect”, the physical and spiritual Principle of all things, “the male Essence of Wisdom”. It is the ideal Sunlight.
  • (WG) Iao (Hebrew), among the Semites, a name for the Supreme Spirit, as Aum is among the Aryans.
  • (TG) Iao Hebdomai {Greek}. The collective “Seven Heavens” (also angels) according to Irenaeus. The mystery-god of the Gnostics. The same as the Seven Manasa-putras of the Occultists. (See also “Yah” and “Yaho”
  • (TG) Ibis Worship . The Ibis, in Egyptian Hab, was sacred to Thoth at Hermopolis. It was called the messenger of Osiris, for it is the symbol of Wisdom, Discrimination, and Purity, as it loathes water if it is the least impure. Its usefulness in devouring the eggs of the crocodiles and serpents was great, and its credentials for divine honours as a symbol were: (a) its black wings, which related it to primeval darkness — chaos; and (b) the triangular shape of them — the triangle being the first geometrical figure and a symbol of the trinitarian mystery. To this day the Ibis is a sacred bird with some tribes of Kopts who live along the Nile.
  • (TG) Ibn Gebirol. Solomon Ben Yehudah: a great philosopher and scholar, a Jew by birth, who lived in the eleventh century in Spain. The same as Avicenna .
  • (TG) Ichchha {Sans}. Will, or will-power.
  • (FY) Itchasakti, will power; force of desire; one of the six forces of Nature.
  • (WG) Ichchha, wish, desire.
  • (WG) Ichchhanabhighata, unobstruction of wish.
  • (TG) Ichchha Sakti {Sans}. Will-power; force of desire; one of the occult Forces of nature. That power of the will which, exercised in occult practices, generates the nerve-currents necessary to set certain muscles in motion and to paralyze certain others.
  • (WG) Ichchha-sakti, the power of will, in the sense of strong desire.
  • (TG) Ichthus {Greek}. A Fish: the symbol of the Fish has been frequently referred to Jesus, the Christ of the New Testament, partly because the five letters forming the word are the initials of the Greek phrase, Iesous Chyistos Theou Uios Soter, Jesus Christ the Saviour, Son of God. Hence his followers in the early Christian centuries were often called fishes, and drawings of fish are found in the Catacombs. Compare also the narrative that some of his early disciples were fishermen, and the assertion of Jesus — “I will make you fishers of men”. Note also the Vesica Piscis, a conventional shape for fish in general, is frequently found enclosing a picture of a Christ, holy virgin, or saint; it is a long oval with pointed ends, the space marked out by the intersection of two equal circles, when less than half the area of one. Compare the Christian female recluse, a Nun — this word is the Chaldee name for fish, and fish is connected with the worship of Venus, a goddess, and the Roman Catholics still eat fish on the Dies Veneris or Friday. [w.w.w.]
  • (TG) Ida {Nors}. The plains of Ida, on which the gods assemble to hold counsel in the Edda. The field of peace and rest.
  • (WG) Ida, a magnetic current on the right side of the human body, between the heart and the Brahma-randhra.
  • (TG) Idaeic Finger. An iron finger strongly magnetized and used in the temples for healing purposes. It produced wonders in that direction, and therefore was said to possess magical powers.
  • (SK)o Idam A pronoun meaning ‘this.’ The Vedic sages often used Idam as a noun to express the manifested Universe in contradistinction to Tat, that Boundless underlying Reality, or that inexpressible Mystery in which the Super-Spirit is rooted.
  • (VS) Iddhi (I 1) [[p. 1]] The Pali word Iddhi, is the synonym of the Sanskrit Siddhis, or psychic faculties, the abnormal powers in man. There are two kinds of iddhis . One group which embraces the lower, coarse, psychic and mental energies; the other is one which exacts the highest training of Spiritual powers. Says Krishna in Shrimad Bhagavat: “He who is engaged in the performance of yoga, who has subdued his senses and who has concentrated his mind in me (Krishna), such yogis all the Siddhis stand ready to serve.”
  • (TG) Ideos, in Paracelsus the same as Chaos, or Mysterium Magnum as that philosopher calls it.
  • (TG) Idises {Nors}. The same as the Dises, the Fairies and Walkyries, the divine women in the Norse legends; they were reverenced by the Teutons before the day of Tacitus, as the latter shows.
  • (TG) Idol. A statue or a picture of a heathen god; or a statue or picture of a Romish Saint, or a fetish of uncivilized tribes.
  • (TG) Idospati {Sans}. The same as Narayana or Vishnu; resembling Poseidon in some respects.
  • (TG) Idra Rabba {Hebr}. “The Greater Holy Assembly”, a division of the Zohar.
  • (TG) Idra Suta {Hebr}. “The Lesser Holy Assembly”, another division of the Zohar.
  • (TG) Iduna {Nors}. The goddess of immortal youth. The daughter of Iwaldi, the Dwarf. She is said in the Edda to have hidden “life” in the Deep of the Ocean, and when the right time came, to have restored it to Earth once more. She was the wife of Bragi, the god of poetry; a most charming myth. Like Heimdal, “born of nine mothers”, Bragi at his birth rises upon the crest of the wave from the bottom of the sea (see Bragi “). he married Iduna, the immortal goddess, who accompanies him to Asgard where every morning she feeds the gods with the apples of eternal youth and health. (See Asgard and the Gods. )
  • (MO) Idun {Nors} (ee-dun) An Asynja: “the fruitful spirit” who feeds the gods the apples of immortality; soul of the earth. She is the wife of Brage, poetic inspiration
  • (TG) Idwatsara {Sans}. One of the five periods that form the Yuga. This cycle is pre-eminently the Vedic cycle, which is taken as the basis of calculation for larger cycles.
  • (TG) Ieu. The “first man”; a Gnostic term used in Pistis-Sophia.
  • (TG) Iezedians or Iezidi {Pers}. This sect came to Syria from Basrah. They use baptism, believe in the archangels, but reverence Satan at the same time. Their prophet Iezad, who preceded Mahomet by long centuries, taught that a messenger from heaven would bring them a book written from the eternity.
  • (TG) Ifing {Nors}. The broad river that divides Asgard, the home of the gods, from that of the Jotuns, the great and strong magicians. Below Asgard was Midgard, where in the sunny aether was built the home of the Light Elves. In their disposition and order of locality, all these Homes answer to the Deva and other Lokas of the Hindus, inhabited by the various classes of gods and Asuras.
  • (MO) Ifing {Nors} (ee-ving) [ ef or if doubt] River that separates men from gods
  • (TG) Igaga {Chald}. Celestial angels, the same as Archangels.
  • (TG) I. H. S. This triad of initials stands for the in hoc signo of the alleged vision of Constantine, of which, save Eusebius, its author, no one ever knew. I.H.S. is interpreted Jesus Hominum Salvator, and In hoc signo. It is, however, well known that the Greek GREEK was one of the most ancient names of Bacchus. As Jesus was never identical with Jehovah, but with his own “Father” (as all of us are), and had come rather to destroy the worship of Jehovah than to enforce it, as the Rosicrucians well maintained, the scheme of Eusebius is very transparent. In hoc signo Victoreris, or the Labarum [[symbol with small capital P over T with horizontal leg half the size of the vertical leg]] (the tau and the resh ) is a very old signum, placed on the foreheads of those who were just initiated. Kenealy translates it as meaning “he who is initiated into the Naronic Secret, or the 600, shall be Victor”; but it is simply “through this sign hast thou conquered”; i.e ., through the light of Initiation — LUX. (See “Neophyte” and “Naros”
  • (TG) Ikhir Bonga . A “Spirit of the Deep” of the Kolarian tribes.
  • (TG) Ikshwaku {Sans}. The progenitor of the Solar tribe (the Suryavansas) in India, and the Son of Vaivaswata Manu, the progenitor of the present human Race.
  • (GH) Ikshvaku The son of Vaivasvata-Manu, of whom it is related in mythology that he was born from the nostril of his father when the latter happened to sneeze! Ikshvaku was the founder of the Suryavansa (the ‘solar dynasty’), reigning at Ayodhya at the commencement of the Treta-Yuga (the second Yuga). ( Bhagavad-Gita , W. Q. Judge, p. 30)
  • (TG) Ila {Sans}. Daughter of Vaivaswata Manu; wife of Buddha, the son of Soma; one month a woman and the other a man by the decree of Saraswati; an allusion to the androgynous second race. Ila is also Vach in another aspect.
  • (TG) Ilavriti {Sans}. A region in the centre of which is placed Mount Meru, the habitat of the gods.
  • (TG) Ilda Baoth. Lit., “the child from the Egg”, a Gnostic term. He is the creator of our physical globe (the earth) according to the Gnostic teaching in the Codex Nazaraeus (the Evangel of the Nazarenes and the Ebionites). The latter identifies him with Jehovah the God of the Jews. Ildabaoth is “the Son of Darkness” in a bad sense and the father of the six terrestrial “Stellar”, dark spirits, the antithesis of the bright Stellar spirits. Their respective abodes are the seven spheres, the upper S of which begins in the “middle space”, the region of their mother Sophia Achamoth, and the lower ending on this earth — the seventh region (See Isis Unveiled, Vol. II., 183 Ilda-Baoth is the genius of Saturn, the planet; or rather the evil spirit of its ruler.
  • (WG) Ilda Baoth, the son of Darkness and god of our material (fourth) globe according to the Gnostic teaching in the Codex Nazaraeus .
  • (TG) Iliados. In Paracelsus the same as “Ideos” . Primordial matter in the subjective state.
  • (TG) Illa-ah, Adam {Hebr}. Adam Illa-ah is the celestial, superior Adam, in the Zohar.
  • (TG) Illinus. One of the gods in the Chaldean Theogony of Damascius.
  • (TG) Illuminati {Latin}. The “Enlightened”, the initiated adepts.
  • (TG) Illusion. In Occultism everything finite (like the universe and all in it) is called illusion or maya.
  • (KT) Illusion. In Occultism everything finite (such as the Universe and all in it) is called Illusion or Maya.
  • (VS) great illusion (I 6) [[p. 3]] Maha Maha “Great Illusion,” the objective Universe.
  • (TG) Ilmatar #fin The Virgin who falls from heaven into the sea before creation. She is the “daughter of the air” and the mother of seven sons (the seven forces in nature). (See Kalevala, the epic poem of Finland.
  • (TG) Ilus {Greek}. Primordial mud or slime; called also Hyle.
  • (FY) Ikhir Bonga, spirit of the deep of the Kolarian tribes.
  • (WG) Iksvaku, son of Manu Vaivasvata, and founder and first kin of the solar dynasty in Ayodhya, the capital of Rama, said to be the modern Oude.
  • (TG) Image. Occultism permits no other image than that of the living image of divine man (the symbol of Humanity) on earth. The Kabbala teaches that this divine Image, the copy of the sublime and holy upper Image (the Elohim) has now changed into another similitude, owing to the development of men’s sinful nature. It is only the upper divine Image (the Ego ) which is the same; the lower (personality) has changed, and man, now fearing the wild beasts, has grown to bear on his face the similitude of many of them. ( Zohar I. fol. 71 a In the early period of Egypt there were no images; but later, as Lenormand says, “In the sanctuaries of Egypt they divided the properties of nature and consequently of Divinity (the Elohim, or the Egos ), into seven abstract qualities, characterised each by an emblem, which are matter, cohesion, fluxion, coagulation, accumulation, station and division”. These were all attributes symbolized in various images.
  • (TG) Imagination. In Occultism this is not to be confused with fancy, as it is one of the plastic powers of the higher Soul, and is the memory of the preceding incarnations, which, however disfigured by the lower Manas, yet rests always on a ground of truth.
  • (TG) Imhot-pou or Imhotep {Egyp}. The god of learning (the Greek Imouthes). He was the son of Ptah, and in one aspect Hermes, as he is represented as imparting wisdom with a book before him. He is a solar god; Lit., “the god of the handsome face”.
  • (PV) Imix First in the Maya primary series of regents or Ahau. Associated with Ixmucane, and the First Age of the Popol Vuh.
  • (TG) Immah {Hebr}. Mother, in contradistinction to Abba, father.
  • (TG) Immah Illa-ah {Hebr}. The upper mother; a name given to Shekinah.
  • (OG) Immortality — A term signifying continuous existence or being; but this understanding of the term is profoundly illogical and contrary to nature, for there is nothing throughout nature’s endless and multifarious realms of being and existence which remains for two consecutive instants of time exactly the same. Consequently, immortality is a mere figment of the imagination, an illusory phantom of reality. When the student of the esoteric wisdom once realizes that continuous progress, i.e., continuous change in advancement, is nature’s fundamental procedure, he recognizes instantly that continuous remaining in an unchanging or immutable state of consciousness or being is not only impossible, but in the last analysis is the last thing that is either desirable or comforting. Fancy continuing immortal in a state of imperfection such as we human beings exemplify — which is exactly what the usual acceptance of this term immortality means. The highest god in highest heaven, although seemingly immortal to us imperfect human beings, is nevertheless an evolving, growing, progressing entity in its own sublime realms or spheres, and therefore as the ages pass leaves one condition or state to assume a succeeding condition or state of a nobler and higher type; precisely as the preceding condition or state had been the successor of another state before it.
  • Continuous or unending immutability of any condition or state of an evolving entity is obviously an impossibility in nature; and when once pondered over it becomes clear that the ordinary acceptance of immortality involves an impossibility. All nature is an unending series of changes, which means all the hosts or multitudes of beings composing nature, for every individual unit of these hosts is growing, evolving, i.e., continuously changing, therefore never immortal. Immortality and evolution are contradictions in terms. An evolving entity means a changing entity, signifying a continuous progress towards better things; and evolution therefore is a succession of state of consciousness and being after another state of consciousness and being, and thus throughout duration. The Occidental idea of static immortality or even mutable immortality is thus seen to be both repellent and impossible.
  • This doctrine is so difficult for the average Occidental easily to understand that it may be advisable once and for all to point out without mincing of words that just as complete death, that is to say, entire annihilation of consciousness, is an impossibility in nature, just so is continuous and unchanging consciousness in any one stage or phase of evolution likewise an impossibility, because progress or movement or growth is continuous throughout eternity. There are, however, periods more or less long of continuance in any stage or phase of consciousness that may be attained by an evolving entity; and the higher the being is in evolution, the more its spiritual and intellectual faculties have been evolved or evoked, the longer do these periods of continuous individual, or perhaps personal, quasi-immortality continue. There is, therefore, what may be called relative immortality, although this phrase is confessedly a misnomer.
  • Master KH in The Mahatma Letters, on pages 128-30, uses the phrase “panaeonic immortality” to signify this same thing that I have just called relative immortality, an immortality — falsely so called, however — which lasts in the cases of certain highly evolved monadic egos for the entire period of a manvantara, but which of necessity ends with the succeeding pralaya of the solar system. Such a period of time of continuous self-consciousness of so highly evolved a monadic entity is to us humans actually a relative immortality; but strictly and logically speaking it is no more immortality than is the ephemeral existence of a butterfly. When the solar manvantara comes to an end and the solar pralaya begins, even such highly evolved monadic entities, full-blown gods, are swept out of manifested self-conscious existence like the sere and dried leaves at the end of the autumn; and the divine entities thus passing out enter into still higher realms of superdivine activity, to reappear at the end of the pralaya and at the dawn of the next or succeeding solar manvantara.
  • The entire matter is, therefore, a highly relative one. What seems immortal to us humans would seem to be but as a wink of the eye to the vision of super-kosmic entities; while, on the other hand, the span of the average human life would seem to be immortal to a self-conscious entity inhabiting one of the electrons of an atom of the human physical body.
  • The thing to remember in this series of observations is the wondrous fact that consciousness from eternity to eternity is uninterrupted, although by the very nature of things undergoing continuous and unceasing change of phases in realization throughout endless duration. What men call unconsciousness is merely a form of consciousness which is too subtle for our gross brain-minds to perceive or to sense or to grasp; and, secondly, strictly speaking, what men call death, whether of a universe or of their own physical bodies, is but the breaking up of worn-out vehicles and the transference of consciousness to a higher plane. It is important to seize the spirit of this marvelous teaching, and not allow the imperfect brain-mind to quibble over words, or to pause or hesitate at difficult terms.
  • (TG) In {Chin}. The female principle of matter, impregnated by Yo, the male ethereal principle, and precipitated thereafter down into the universe.
  • (TG) Incarnations (Divine) or Avatars. The Immaculate Conception is as pre-eminently Egyptian as it is Indian. As the author of Egyptian Belief has it: “It is not the vulgar, coarse and sensual story as in Greek mythology, but refined, moral and spiritual”; and again the incarnation idea was found revealed on the wall of a Theban temple by Samuel Sharpe, who thus analyzes it: “First the god Thoth . . . as the messenger of the gods, like the Mercury of the Greeks (or the Gabriel of the first Gospel), tells the maiden queen Mautmes, that she is to give birth to a son, who is to be king Amunotaph III. Secondly, the god Kneph, the Spirit . . . . and the goddess Hathor (Nature) . . . both take hold of the queen by the hands and put into her mouth the character for life, a cross, which is to be the life of the coming child”, etc., etc. Truly divine incarnation, or the avatar doctrine, constituted the grandest mystery of every old religious system!
  • (WG) Incarnation, the descent into matter, or contacting of the Soul with physical existence.
  • (TG) Incas (Peruvian). The name given to the creative gods in the Peruvian theogony, and later to the rulers of the country. “The Incas, seven in number have repeopled the earth after the Deluge”, Coste makes them say (I. iv., p. 19). They belonged at the beginning of the fifth Root-race to a dynasty of divine kings, such as those of Egypt, India and Chaldea.
  • (TG) Incubus {Latin}. Something more real and dangerous than the ordinary meaning given to the word, viz ., that of “nightmare”. An Incubus is the male Elemental, and Succuba the female, and these are undeniably the spooks of mediaeval demonology, called forth from the invisible regions by human passion and lust. They are now called “Spirit brides” and “Spirit husbands” among some benighted Spiritists and spiritual mediums. But these poetical names do not prevent them in the least being that which they are — Ghools, Vampires and soulless Elementals; formless centres of Life, devoid of sense; in short, subjective protoplasms when left alone, but called into a definite being and form by the creative and diseased imagination of certain mortals. They were known under every clime as in every age, and the Hindus can tell more than one terrible tale of the dramas enacted in the life of young students and mystics by the Pisachas, their name in India.
  • (WG) Incubus, the male Elemental called into existence by sexual passion and lust. The female is called the Succubus .
  • (TG) Individuality. One of the names given in Theosophy and Occultism to the Human Higher EGO. We make a distinction between the immortal and divine Ego, and the mortal human Ego which perishes. The latter, or “personality” (personal Ego) survives the dead body only for a time in the Kama Loka; the Individuality prevails for ever.
  • (KT) Individuality. One of the names given in Theosophy and Occultism to the human Higher Ego. We make a distinction between the immortal and divine and the mortal human Ego which perishes. The latter or “Personality” (personal Ego) survives the dead body but for a time in Kama Loka: the Individuality prevails for ever.
  • (WG) Individuality, the permanent principle in man. A name applied by Theosophists to the Higher Ego, in contradistinction to the lower, transitory element, the “personality”. (See Higher Ego
  • (OG) Individuality — Theosophists draw a sharp and comprehensive distinction between individuality and personality. The individuality is the spiritual-intellectual and immortal part of us; deathless, at least for the duration of the kosmic manvantara — the root, the very essence of us, the spiritual sun within, our inner god. The personality is the veil, the mask, composed of various sheaths of consciousness through which the individuality acts.
  • The word individuality means that which cannot be divided, that which is simple and pure in the philosophical sense, indivisible, uncompounded, original. It is not heterogeneous; it is not composite; it is not builded up of other elements; it is the thing in itself . Whereas, on the contrary, the intermediate nature and the lower nature are composite, and therefore mortal, being builded up of elements other than themselves. Strictly speaking, individuality and monad are identical, but the two words are convenient because of the distinctions of usage contained in them; just as consciousness and self-consciousness are fundamentally identical, but convenient as words on account of the distinctions contained in them. ( See also Monad) WW Individual [[We will now]] take up Individual and Person . Individual is from the word individuum, that which cannot be divided, the indivisible. Its abstraction, that is to say the ‘whatness’ of it, what the scholastics called the ‘quiddity’, the essence of it, is individuality . Quiddity is from the scholastic term quid, what, the whatness of a thing, its essence, its nature; as for instance, the essence (essential nature) of water would be wetness, and fluidity too, perhaps. Individuality, therefore, is the abstraction or nature of individual . We see at once that it is a logical error to speak of individuality, unless indeed we do mean my individuality, and not myself as an individual.
  • (TG) Indra {Sans}. The god of the Firmament, the King of the sidereal gods. A Vedic Deity.
  • (WG) Indra, one of the great powers of nature; the name of god, or power, in heaven (svarga) found in Sanskrit literature, sometimes directly and at other times indirectly signifying Parabrahmam.
  • (GH) Indra The god of the sky and atmosphere: in the Vedas, lord of the deities of the intermediate region (the sky), lord of rain and thunder, and leader of the storm-gods (Maruts, q.v. ). He is represented as riding in a golden car drawn by two tawny horses, waging war upon the demons of darkness (especially Vritra, the demon of drought, whom he slays; hence he is called Vritrajit), and conquering them with his thunderbolt (vajra) and his bow and arrows. Originally Indra was not the chief of the gods, but because of the religious observances instituted necessitating the invocation of the deity of the atmosphere, he superseded the more spiritual Varuna: thus more Vedic hymns are addressed to Indra than to any other deity, except Agni . In later mythology, however, the Trimurti (Brahma, Vishnu, Siva) became most prominent, therefore Indra was relegated to a subservient position. In The Laws of Manu (Manava-Dharma-Sastra) he is the regent of Svarga (heaven) with particular watch over the east quarter, and is considered one of the twelve Adityas . He is then represented as riding a white horse (Uchchaihsravas, q.v. ), or an elephant (Airavata, q.v. ).
  • “Fohat is the scientific aspect of both Vishnu and Indra, the latter older and more important in the Rig Veda than his sectarian successor” ( Secret Doctrine, I, p. 673). ( Bhagavad-Gita, W. Q. Judge, p. 67)
  • (TG) Indrani {Sans}. The female aspect of Indra.
  • (TG) Indriya or Deha Sanyama {Sans}. The control of the senses in Yoga practice. These are the ten external agents; the five senses which are used for perception are called Jnana-indriya, and the five used for action — Karma-indriya. Pancha-indryani means literally and in its occult sense “the five roots producing life” (eternal). With the Buddhists, it is the five positive agents producing five supernal qualities.
  • (FY) Indriya, or Deha Sanyama, control over the senses.
  • (WG) Indriyas, the senses. (Literally, “belonging to Indra.”)
  • (TG) Induyansa {Sans}. Also Somavansa or the lunar race (dynasty), from Indu, the Moon. (See “Suryavansa”
  • (TG) Indwellers. A name or the substitute for the right Sanskrit esoteric name, given to our “inner enemies”, which are seven in the esoteric philosophy. The early Christian Church called them the “seven capital Sins”: the Nazarene Gnostics named them, the “seven badly disposed Stellars”, and so on. Hindu exoteric teachings speak only of the ” six enemies and under the term Arishadwarga enumerate them as follows (1) Personal desire, lust or any passion (Kama) ; (2) Hatred or malice (Krodha) ; (3) Avarice or cupidity (Lobha) ; (4) Ignorance (Moha) ; (5) Pride or arrogance (Mada) ; (6) jealousy, envy (Matcharya) ; forgetting the seventh, which is the “unpardonable sin”, and the worst of all in Occultism. (See Theosophist, May, 1890, p. 431
  • (TG) Ineffable Name. With the Jews, the substitute for the ” mystery name” of their tribal deity Eh-yeh, “I am”, or Jehovah. The third commandment prohibiting the using of the latter name “in vain”, the Hebrews substituted for it that of Adonai or “the Lord”. But the Protestant Christians who, translating indifferently Jehovah and Elohim — which is also a substitute per se, besides being an inferior deity name — by the words “Lord” and “God”, have become in this instance more Catholic than the Pope, and include in the prohibition both the names. At the present moment, however, neither Jews nor Christians seem to remember, or so much as suspect, the occult reason why the qualification of Jehovah or YHVH had become reprehensible; most of the Western Kabbalists also seem to be unaware of the fact. The truth is, that the name they bring forward as “ineffable”, is not in the least so. It is the “unpronounceable”, or rather the name not to be pronounced, if any thing; and this for symbological reasons. To begin with, the “Ineffable Name ” of the true Occultist, is no name at all, least of all is it that of Jehovah. The latter implies, even in its Kabbalistical, esoteric meaning, an androgynous nature, YHVH, or one of a male and female nature. It is simply Adam and Eve, or man and woman blended in one, and as now written and pronounced, is itself a substitute. But the Rabbins do not care to remember the Zoharic admission that YHVH means “not as I Am written, Am I read” ( Zohar, fol. III., 230 a ). One has to know how to divide the Tetragrammaton ad infinitum before one arrives at the sound of the truly unpronounceable name of the Jewish mystery-god. That the Oriental Occultists have their own “Ineffable name” it is hardly necessary to repeat.
  • (OG) Infinite — A term meaning that which is not finite. The expression is used sometimes with almost absurd inaccuracy, and is one which in all probability representing as it does imperfect understanding could never be found in any of the great religious or philosophical systems of the ancients. Occidental writers of the past and present often use the word infinite as applying to beings or entities, such as in the expression “an infinite personal deity” — a ludicrous joining of contradictory and disparate words. The ancients rejected the phantom idea that this term involves, and used instead expressions such as the Boundless, or the Frontierless, or the Endless, whether speaking of abstract space or abstract time — the latter more properly called unending duration. ( See also Absolute)
  • (IN)ITIATE
  • For more information, see Teachers, Disciples, and the Hierarchy of Compassion on this site.
  • (TG) Initiate. From the Latin Initiatus. The designation of anyone who was received into and had revealed to him the mysteries and secrets of either Masonry or Occultism. In times of antiquity, those who had been initiated into the arcane knowledge taught by the Hierophants of the Mysteries; and in our modern days those who have been initiated by the adepts of mystic lore into the mysterious knowledge, which, notwithstanding the lapse of ages, has yet a few real votaries on earth.
  • (IU) Initiates. — In times of antiquity, those who had been initiated into the arcane knowledge taught by the hierophants of the Mysteries; and in our modern days those who have been initiated by the adepts of mystic lore into the mysterious knowledge, which, notwithstanding the lapse of ages, has yet a few real votaries on earth.
  • (KT) Initiate. From the Latin Initiatus. The designation of anyone who was received into and had revealed to him the mysteries and secrets of either Masonry or Occultism. In times of antiquity they were those who had been initiated into the arcane knowledge taught by the Hierophants of the Mysteries; and in our modern days those who have been initiated by the adepts of mystic lore into the mysterious knowledge, which, notwithstanding the lapse of ages, has yet a few real votaries on earth.
  • (WG) Initiate, one who has passed through an Initiation; especially, one who has passed the seventh or final Initiation on this planet.
  • (OG) Initiates — Those who have passed at least one initiation and therefore those who understand the mystery-teachings and who are ready to receive them at some future time in even larger measure. Please note the distinction between initiant and initiate. An initiant is one who is beginning or preparing for an initiation. An initiate is one who has successfully passed at least one initiation. It is obvious therefore that an initiate is always an initiant when he prepares for a still higher initiation.
  • The mystery-teachings were held as the most sacred treasure or possession that men could transmit to their descendants who were worthy postulants. The revelation of these mystery-doctrines under the seal of initiation, and under proper conditions to worthy depositaries, worked marvelous changes in the lives of those who underwent successfully the initiatory trials. It made men different from what they were before they received this spiritual and intellectual revelation. The facts are found in all the old religions and philosophies, if these are studied honestly. Initiation was always spoken of under the metaphor or figure of speech of “a new birth,” a “birth into truth,” for it was a spiritual and intellectual rebirth of the powers of the human spirit-soul, and could be called in all truth a birth of the soul into a loftier and nobler self-consciousness. When this happened, such men were called “initiates” or the reborn. In India, such reborn men were anciently called dvija, a Sanskrit word meaning “twice-born.” In Egypt such initiates or reborn men were called “Sons of the Sun.” In other countries they were called by other names.
  • (TG) Initiation. From the same root as the Latin initial which means the basic or first principles of any Science. The practice of initiation or admission into the sacred Mysteries, taught by the Hierophants and learned priests of the Temples, is one of the most ancient customs. This was practised in every old national religion. In Europe it was abolished with the fall of the last pagan temple. There exists at present but one kind of initiation known to the public, namely that into the Masonic rites. Masonry, however, has no more secrets to give out or conceal. In the palmy days of old, the Mysteries, according to the greatest Greek and Roman philosophers, were the most sacred of all solemnities as well as the most beneficent, and greatly promoted virtue. The Mysteries represented the passage from mortal life into finite death, and the experiences of the disembodied Spirit and Soul in the world of subjectivity. In our own day, as the secret is lost, the candidate passes through sundry meaningless ceremonies and is initiated into the solar allegory of Hiram Abiff, the “Widow’s Son”.
  • (WG) Initiation, the ceremony of introducing to fresh knowledge concerning anything. Applied to the rite of admission into the sacred mysteries.
  • (OG) Initiation — In olden times there were seven — and even ten — degrees of initiation. Of these seven degrees, three consisted of teachings alone, which formed the preparation, the discipline, spiritual and mental and psychic and physical — what the Greeks called the katharsis or “cleansing.” When the disciple was considered sufficiently cleansed, purified, disciplined, quiet mentally, tranquil spiritually, then he was taken into the fourth degree, which likewise consisted partly of teaching, but also in part of direct personal introduction by the old mystical processes into the structure and operations of the universe, by which means truth was gained by first-hand personal experience. In other words, to speak in plain terms, his spirit-soul, his individual consciousness, was assisted to pass into other planes and realms of being, and to know and to understand by the sheer process of becoming them . A man, a mind, an understanding, can grasp and see, and thereby know, only those things which the individual entity itself is .
  • After the fourth degree, there followed the fifth and the sixth and the seventh initiations, each in turn, and these consisted of teachings also; but more and more as the disciple progressed — and he was helped in this development more and more largely as he advanced farther — there was evolved forth in him the power and faculties still farther and more deeply to penetrate beyond the veils of maya or illusion; until, having passed the seventh or last initiation of all of the manifest initiations, if we may call them that, he became one of those individuals whom theosophists call the mahatmas.
  • (OG) Inner God — Mystics of all the ages have united in teaching this fact of the existence and ever-present power of an individual inner god in each human being, as the first principle or primordial energy governing the progress of man out of material life into the spiritual. Indeed, the doctrine is so perfectly universal, and is so consistent with everything that man knows when he reflects over the matter of his own spiritual and intellectual nature, that it is small wonder that this doctrine should have acquired foremost place in human religious and philosophical consciousness. Indeed, it may be called the very foundation-stone on which were builded the great systems of religious and philosophical thinking of the past; and rightly so, because this doctrine is founded on nature herself.
  • The inner god in man, man’s own inner, essential divinity, is the root of him, whence flow forth in inspiring streams into the psychological apparatus of his constitution all the inspirations of genius, all the urgings to betterment. All powers, all faculties, all characteristics of individuality, which blossom through evolution into individual manifestation, are the fruitage of the working in man’s constitution of those life-giving and inspiring streams of spiritual energy.
  • The radiant light which streams forth from that immortal center or core of our inmost being, which is our inner god, lightens the pathway of each one of us; and it is from this light that we obtain ideal conceptions. It is by this radiant light in our hearts that we can guide our feet towards an ever larger fulfilling in daily life of the beautiful conceptions which we as mere human beings dimly or clearly perceive, as the case may be.
  • The divine fire which moves through universal Nature is the source of the individualized divine fire coming from man’s inner god.
  • The modern Christians of a mystical bent of mind call the inner god the Christ Immanent, the immanent Christos; in Buddhism it is called the living Buddha within; in Brahmanism it is spoken of as the Brahma in his Brahmapura or Brahma-city, which is the inner constitution.
  • Hence, call it by what name you please, the reflective and mystical mind intuitively realizes that there works through him a divine flame, a divine life, a divine light, and that this by whatever name we may call it, is himself, his essential SELF. ( See also God)
  • (TG) Inner Man. An occult term, used to designate the true and immortal Entity in us, not the outward and mortal form of clay that we call our body. The term applies, strictly speaking, only to the Higher Ego, the “astral man” being the appellation of the Double and of Kama Rupa or the surviving eidolon.
  • (TG) Innocents. A nick-name given to the Initiates and Kabbalists before the Christian era. The “Innocents” of Bethlehem and of Lud (or Lydda) who were put to death by Alexander Janneus, to the number of several thousands (B.C. 100, or so), gave rise to the legend of the 40,000 innocent babes murdered by Herod while searching for the infant Jesus. The first is a little known historical fact, the second a fable, as sufficiently shown by Renan in his Vie de Jesus.
  • (TG) Intercosmic gods. The Planetary Spirits, Dhyan-Chohans, Devas of various degrees of spirituality, and “Archangels” in general.
  • (OG) Intermediate Nature — To speak of man as a trichotomy, or as having a division into three parts — as in the Christian New Testament: a “natural” body, a psychical body, and a spiritual body — is a convenient expression, but it by no means sets forth in detail the entire economy of man’s inner being.
  • Following then this trichotomy, there is first the divinespiritual element in the human constitution which is man’s own individual inner god; second, the soul or human monad, which is his human egoic self, his intermediate or psychical or second nature; third, all the composite lower part of him which although comprising several sheaths may be conveniently grouped under the one term vehicle or body. Gods, monads, and atoms collectively in nature are copied in the essential trichotomy of man, as spirit, soul, and body, and hence the latter is another way of saying man’s divine-spiritual, intermediate soul, and astral-physical parts.
  • It is the intermediate nature, offspring of the divine spark, which enshrines the ray from the divine spark, its spiritual sun so to say, and steps it down into the ordinary mentality of man. It is this intermediate nature which reincarnates. The divine-spiritual part of man does not reincarnate, for this part of man has no need of learning the lessons that physical life can give: it is far above them all. But it is the intermediate part functioning through the various garments or sheaths of the inner man — these garments may be called astral or ethereal — which in this manner can reach down to and touch our earthly plane; and the physical body is the garment of flesh in touch with the physical world.
  • The intermediate nature is commonly called the human soul. It is an imperfect thing, and is that which comes back into incarnation, because it is drawn to this earth by attraction. It learns much needed lessons here, in this sphere of the universal life. ( See also Principles of Man)
  • (OG) Invisible Worlds — The ancient wisdom teaches that the universe is not only a living organism, but that physical human beings live in intimate connection, in intimate contact, with invisible spheres, with invisible and intangible realms, unknown to man because the physical senses are so imperfectly evolved that we neither see these invisible realms nor feel nor hear nor smell nor taste them, nor cognize them except by that much more highly evolved and subtle sensorium which men call the mind. These inner realms interpenetrate our physical sphere, permeate it, so that in our daily affairs as we go about our duties we actually pass through the dwellings, through the mountains, through the lakes, through the very beings, mayhap, of the entities of and dwelling in these invisible realms. These invisible realms are built of matter just as this our physical world is, but of a more ethereal matter than ours is; but we cognize them not at all with our physical senses. The explanation is that it is all a matter of differing rates of vibration of substances.
  • The reader must be careful not to confuse this theosophical teaching of inner worlds and spheres with what the modern Spiritism of the Occident has to say on the matter. The “Summerland” of the Spiritists in no wise resembles the actuality which the theosophical philosophy teaches of, the doctrine concerning the structure and operations of the visible and invisible kosmos. The warning seems necessary lest an unwary reader may imagine that the invisible worlds and spheres of the theosophical teachings are identic with the Summerland of the Spiritists, for it is not so.
  • Our senses tell us absolutely nothing of the far-flung planes and spheres which belong to the ranges and functionings of the invisible substances and energies of the universe; yet those inner and invisible planes and spheres are actually inexpressibly more important than what our physical senses tell us of the physical world, because these invisible planes are the causal realms, of which our physical world or universe, however far extended in space, is but the effectual or phenomenal or resultant production.
  • But while these inner and invisible worlds or planes or spheres are the fountainhead, ultimately, of all the energies and matters of the whole physical world, yet to an entity inhabiting these inner and invisible worlds or planes, these latter are as substantial and “real” — using the popular word — to that entity as our gross physical world is to us. Just as we know in our physical world various grades or conditions of energy and matter, from the physically grossest to the most ethereal, precisely after the same general plan do the inhabitants of these invisible and inner and to us superior worlds know and cognize their own grossest and also most ethereal substances and energies.
  • Man as well as all the other entities of the universe is inseparably connected with these worlds invisible.
  • (OG) Involution — The reverse process or procedure of evolution. As evolution means the unfolding, the unwrapping, the rolling forth, of what already exists and is latent, so involution means the inwrapping, the infolding, the ingoing of what previously exists or has been unfolded, etc. Involution and evolution never in any circumstances can be even conceived of properly as operative the one apart from the other: every act of evolution is an act of involution, and vice versa. To illustrate, as spirit and matter are fundamentally one and yet eternally co-active and interactive, so involution and evolution are two names for two phases of the same procedure of growth, and are eternally coactive and interactive. As an example, the so-called descent of the monads into matter means an involution or involving or infolding of spiritual potencies into material vehicles which coincidently and contemporaneously, through the compelling urge of the infolding energies, unfold their own latent capacities, unwrap them, roll them forth; and this is the evolution of matter. Thus what is the involution of spirit is contemporaneously and pari passu the evolution of matter. Contrariwise, on the ascending or luminous arc when the involved monadic essences begin to rise towards their primordial spiritual source they begin to unfold or unwrap themselves as previously on the descending arc they had infolded or inwrapped themselves. But this process of unfolding or evolution of the monadic essences is contemporaneous with and pari passu with the infolding and inwrapping, the involution, of the material energies and powers.
  • Human birth and death are outstanding illustrations or examples of the same thing. The child is born, and as it grows to its full efflorescence of power it evolves or rolls forth certain inherent characteristics or energies or faculties, all derived from the human being’s svabhava or ego. Contrariwise, when the decline of human life begins, there is a slow infolding or inwrapping of these same facilities which thus seem gradually to diminish. These facilities and energies thus evolved forth in earth-life are the working of the innate spiritual and intellectual and psychical characteristics impelling and compelling the vehicular or body sides of the human constitution to express themselves as organs becoming more and more perfect as the child grows to maturity.
  • After death the process is exactly the reverse. The material or vehicular side of the being grows less and less strong and powerful, more and more involved, and becoming with every step in the process more dormant. But contemporaneously and coincidently the distinctly spiritual and intellectual powers and faculties themselves become released from the vehicles and begin to expand into ever larger efflorescence, attaining their maximum in the devachan. It is only the usual carelessness in accurate thinking that induces the idea that evolution is one distinct process acting alone, and that involution — about which by the way very little is heard — is another process acting alone. The two, as said above, are the two phases of activity of the evolving monads, and these phases exist contemporaneously at any moment, each of the two phases continually acting and interacting with the other phase. They are inseparable.
  • Just so with spirit and matter. Spirit is not something radically distinct from and utterly separate from matter. The two are fundamentally one, and the two are eternally coactive and interactive.
  • There are several terms in Sanskrit which correspond to what the theosophist means by evolution, but perhaps the best general term is pravritti, meaning to “revolve” or to “roll forwards,” to unroll or to unwrap. Again, the reverse procedure or involution can probably best be expressed in Sanskrit by the term nivritti, meaning “rolling backwards” or “inwrapping” or “infolding.” A term which is frequently interchangeable with evolution is emanation. ( See also Evolution)
  • (MO) Iormungandr {Nors} (yer-mung-andr) [ jormun immense + andr breath] An offspring of Loki: the Midgard serpent. (May be the equator, the plane of the ecliptic, or the Milky Way)
  • (TG) Iranian Morals. The little work called Ancient Iranian and Zoroastrian Morals, compiled by Mr. Dhunjibhoy Jamsetjee Medhora, a Parsi Theosophist of Bombay, is an excellent treatise replete with the highest moral teachings, in English and Gujerati, and will acquaint the student better than many volumes with the ethics of the ancient Iranians.
  • (TG) Irdhi {Sans}. The synthesis of the then “supernatural” occult powers in Buddhism and Brahmanism.
  • (TG) Irkalla {Chald}. The god of Hades, called by the Babylonians “the country unseen”.
  • (WG) Isa, lord; the name of one of the Upanishads, which treat of spiritual identity or unity.
  • (TG) Isarim {Hebr}. The Essenian Initiates.
  • (TG) Ishim {Chald}. The B ‘ ne-Aleim, the “beautiful sons of god”, the originals and prototypes of the later “Fallen Angels”.
  • (TG) Ishmonia {arabic}. The city near which is buried the so-called “petrified city” in the Desert. Legend speaks of immense subterranean halls and chambers, passages, and libraries secreted in them. Arabs dread its neighbourhood after sunset.
  • (TG) Ishtar {Chald}. The Babylonian Venus, called “the eldest of heaven and earth”, and daughter of Anu, the god of heaven. She is the goddess of love and beauty. The planet Venus, as the evening star, is identified with Ishtar, and as the morning star with Anunit, the goddess of the Akkads. There exists a most remarkable story of her descent into Hades, on the sixth and Seventh Assyrian tiles or tablets deciphered by the late G. Smith. Any Occultist who reads of her love for Tammuz, his assassination by Izdubar, the despair of the goddess and her descent in search of her beloved through the seven gates of Hades, and finally her liberation from the dark realm, will recognise the beautiful allegory of the soul in search of the Spirit.
  • (TG) Isiac table. A true monument of Egyptian art. It represents the goddess Isis under many of her aspects. The Jesuit Kircher describes it as a table of copper overlaid with black enamel and silver incrustations. It was in the possession of Cardinal Bembo, and therefore called “Tabula Bembina sive Mensa Isiaca”. Under this title it is described by W. Wynn Westcott, M.B., who gives its “History and Occult Significance” in an extremely interesting and learned volume (with photographs and illustrations). The tablet was believed to have been a votive offering to Isis in one of her numerous temples. At the sack of Rome in 1525, it came into the possession of a soldier who sold it to Cardinal Bembo. Then it passed to the Duke of Mantua in 1630, when it was lost.
  • (TG) Isis. In Egyptian Issa, the goddess Virgin-Mother; personified nature. In Egyptian or Koptic Uasi, the female reflection of Uasar or Osiris. She is the “woman clothed with the sun” of the land of Chemi. Isis-Latona is the Roman Isis.
  • (FY) Isis (“Isis Unveiled”), book written by Madame Blavatsky on the Esoteric Doctrine.
  • (WG) Isis, the mystic “Mother” of Nature in Egyptian lore. The “woman clothed with the sun”.
  • (TG) Isitwa {Sans}. The divine Power.
  • (WG) Isita, one of the eight superhuman faculties. The power to exercise supreme dominion. See Vibhuti .
  • (VS) Holy Isle [[p. 59]] The Higher Ego, or Thinking Self.
  • (TG) Israel {Hebr}. The Eastern Kabbalists derive the name from Isaral or Asar, the Sun-God. “Isra-el” signifies “striving with god”: the “sun rising upon Jacob-Israel” means the Sun-god Isaral (or Isar-el) striving with, and to fecundate matter, which has power with “God and with man” and often prevails over both. Esau, Aesaou, Asu, is also the Sun. Esau and Jacob, the allegorical twins, are the emblems of the ever struggling dual principle in nature — good and evil, darkness and sunlight, and the “Lord” (Jehovah) is their antetype. Jacob-Israel is the feminine principle of Esau, as Abel is that of Cain, both Cain and Esau being the male principle. Hence, like Malach-Iho, the “Lord” Esau fights with Jacob and prevails not. In Genesis 32 the God-Sun first strives with Jacob, breaks his thigh (a phallic symbol) and yet is defeated by his terrestrial type — matter; and the Sun-God rises on Jacob and his, thigh in covenant. All these biblical personages, their “Lord God” included, are types represented in an allegorical sequence. They are types of Life and Death, Good and Evil, Light and Darkness, of Matter and Spirit in their synthesis, all these being under their contrasted aspects.
  • (TG) Iswara, {Sans}. The “Lord” or the personal god — divine Spirit in man. Lit., sovereign (independent) existence. A title given to Siva and other gods in India. Siva is also called Iswaradeva, or sovereign deva.
  • (KT) Iswara {Sans} The “Lord” or the personal god, divine spirit in man. Literally Sovereign (independent) existence. A title given to Siva and other gods in India. Siva is also called Iswaradeva, or sovereign deva.
  • (FY) Iswara, Personal God, Lord, the Spirit in man, the Divine principle in its active nature or condition, one of the four states of Brahma.
  • (WG) Isvara, lord, master; an epithet of Siva, also of Durga or any other female sakti; the Supreme Spirit, or Atman, — the usual meaning in modern Theosophical works; one of the three inseparable realities — Chit, Achit and Isvara — combined in Parabrahmam, the three-in-one, which pervades and controls the universe; that part of the trinity which, assuming a form of suddasatva (intellectual substance), enables yogis to engage in contemplation who would otherwise be incapable of contemplating or comprehending the impersonal deity. (Pronounced, and often written, Ishwara
  • (OG) Isvara — {Sans} Isvara means “lord,” and is a term which is frequently applied in Hindu mythology not only to kosmic divinities, but to the expression of the cosmic spirit in the human being. Consequently, when reference is had to the individual human being, Isvara is the divine individualized spirit in man — man’s own personal god. It may be otherwise described as the divine ego, the child of the divine monad in a man, and in view of this fact also could be used with reference to the dhyani-buddha or to the immanent Christ in a man. In India it is a title frequently given to Siva and other gods of the Hindu pantheon.
  • (GH) Isvara ‘Lord’ (used in the same sense as is the term ‘Father in heaven’ in the Christian New Testament), hence the Supreme Self or Hierarch of a system, applicable to the great or to the small — to the universe or to man. In man it is the Divine Spirit, or the Divine-Spiritual Monad. Isvara is also used as a title for many of the gods, such as Vishnu and Siva.
  • “The Logos, or both the unmanifested and the manifested WORD, is called by the Hindus, Iswara, ‘the Lord,’ . . . Iswara, say the Vedantins, is the highest consciousness in nature. ‘This highest consciousness,’ answer the Occultists, ‘is only a synthetic unit in the world of the manifested Logos . . . for it is the sum total of Dhyan-Chohanic consciousnesses.’ ” ( Secret Doctrine, I, p. 573) (The following word is derived from the verbal root:) is, to rule, to be master. Bhagavad-Gita, W. Q. Judge, p. 130)
  • (SKv) Isvara, Avalokitesvara Isvara is derived from the verbal root is — to rule, to be master; hence Isvara is often applied to the ‘Lord’ or summit of any hierarchy, universe, Solar System or man. Avalokitesvara means ‘the manifested Isvara,’ or the ava-lokita — downwards-seen Lord; thus suggesting the realization of that glorious experience when the Divine Self is perceived by the Human Self, or when Adi-Buddha is perceived by god-like beings and Dhyan-Chohans.
  • (SP) Isvara [Iswara] — lord, head of a hierarchy.
  • Isvarah sarvabhutanam hriddese rjuna tishthati The Lord, O Arjuna dwells in the Heart of all Beings
  • (TG) Ithyphallic {Greek}. Qualification of the gods as males and hermaphrodites, such as the bearded Venus, Apollo in woman’s clothes, Ammon the generator, the embryonic Ptah, and so on. Yet the phallus, so conspicuous and, according to our prim notions, so indecent, in the Indian and Egyptian religions, was associated in the earliest symbology far more with another and much purer idea than that of sexual creation. As shown by many an Orientalist, it expressed resurrection, the rising in life from death. Even the other meaning had nought indecent in it: “These images only symbolise in a very expressive manner the creative force of nature, without obscene intention,” writes Marlette Bey, and adds, “It is but another way to express celestial generation, which should cause the deceased to enter into a new life”. Christians and Europeans are very hard on the phallic symbols of the ancients. The nude gods and goddesses and their generative emblems and statuary have secret departments assigned to them in our museums; why then adopt and preserve the same symbols for Clergy and Laity ? The love-feasts in the early Church — its agapae — were as pure (or as impure) as the Phallic festivals of the Pagans; the long priestly robes of the Roman and Greek Churches, and the long hair of the latter, the holy water sprinklers and the rest, are there to show that Christian ritualism has preserved in more or less modified forms all the symbolism of old Egypt. As to the symbolism of a purely feminine nature, we are bound to confess that in the sight of every impartial archaeologist the half nude toilets of our cultured ladies of Society are far more suggestive of female-sex worship than are the rows of yoni-shaped lamps, lit along the highways to temples in India.
  • Iti maya srutam Thus have I heard
  • (KT) Iu-Kabar Zivo, Gnostic term. The “Lord of the aeons” in the Nazarene system. He is the procreator (Emanator) of the seven holy lives (the seven primal Dhyan Chohans or Archangels, each representing one of the cardinal virtues), and is himself called the third life (third Logos). In the Codex he is addressed as the Helm and Vine of the food of life. Thus he is identical with Christ (Christos) who says: “I am the true vine and my Father is the husbandman.” (John xv. 1 It is well known that Christ is regarded in the Roman Catholic Church as the “Chief of the aeons,” as also is Michael, “who is as God.” Such also was the belief of the Gnostics.
  • (TG) Iu-Kabar Zivo {Gnos}. Known also as Nebat-Iavar-bar-Iufin-Ifafin, “Lord of the Aeons” in the Nazarene System. He is the procreator (Emanator) of the seven holy lives (the seven primal Dhyan Chohans, or Archangels, each representing one of the cardinal Virtues), and is himself called the third life (third Logos). In the Codex he is addressed as “the Helm and Vine of the food of life”. Thus, he is identical with Christ (Christos) who says “I am the true Vine and my Father is the Husbandman”(John xv. 1). It is well known that Christ is regarded in the Roman man Catholic Church as the “chief of the Aeons”, and also as Michael “who is like god”. Such was also the belief of the Gnostics.
  • (TG) Iurbo Adunai. A Gnostic term, or the compound name for Iao-Jehovah, whom the Ophites regarded as an emanation of their Ilda-Baoth, the Son of Sophia Achamoth — the proud, ambitious and jealous god, and impure Spirit, whom many of the Gnostic sects regarded as the god of Moses. “Iurbo is called by the Abortions (the Jews) Adunai” says the Codex Nazaraeus (vol. iii., p, 13 The “Abortions” and Abortives was the nickname given to the Jews by their opponents the Gnostics.
  • (FY) Ivabhavat, the one substance.
  • (TG) Iwaldi {Nors}. The dwarf whose sons fabricated for Odin the magic spear. One of the subterranean master-smiths who, together with other gnomes, contrived to make an enchanted sword for the great war-god Cheru. This two-edged-sword figures in the legend of the Emperor Vitellius, who got it from the god, — “to his own hurt”, according to the oracle of a “wise woman”, neglected it and was finally killed with it at the foot of the capitol, by a German soldier who had purloined the weapon. The “sword of the war-god” has a long biography, since it also re-appears in the half-legendary biography of Attila. Having married against her will Ildikd, the beautiful daughter of the King of Burgundy whom he had slain, his bride gets the magic sword from a mysterious old woman, and with it kills the King of the Huns.
  • (MO) Ivalde {Nors} (ee-vahl-deh) A giant: the previous imbodiment of earth
  • (PV) Ixbalamque {quiche-maya} With Hunahpu, her inseparable “twin,” the hero god of the Quiche-Maya. The feminine aspect of god-Five; new-moon goddess. Grandchild of Ixpiyacoc and Ixmucane. Her nahual is the jaguar. With Hunahpu, apotheosized at the end of the Third Age of the Popol Vuh.
  • (PV) Ixcanleos The Maya equivalent of the Quiche Ixmucane, “the mother of the gods.”
  • (PV) Ixmucane {quiche-maya} With Ixpiyacoc, the Supreme Pair of Quiche-Maya theogony, grandparents of the Mayas and of humanity as a whole. A feminine deity, the old lunar-earth goddess. Identical with the Maya Ixcanleos.
  • (PV) Ixpiyacoc {quiche-maya} The equivalent of Hunab ku, the Supreme Being of Maya tradition. With Ixmucane, the Supreme Pair of Quiche-Maya theogony, and grandparents of humanity. A masculine deity, the father of the Seven Ahpu.
  • (PV) Ixquic {quiche-maya} The mother of Hunahpu and Ixbalamque in the Popol Vuh ; a lunar goddess and earth goddess, associated with the four cosmic bearers. Immaculately fertilized by the Seven Ahpu, she bears their offspring, the twin savior deity. Her nahual is the jaguar.
  • (TG) Izdubar. A name of a hero in the fragments of Chaldean History and Theogony on the so-called Assyrian tiles, as, read by the late George Smith and others. Smith seeks to identify Izdubar with Nimrod. Such may or may not be the case but as the name of that Babylonian King itself only “appears” as Izdubar, his identification with the soil of Cush may also turn out more apparent than real. Scholars are but too apt to Check their archaeological discoveries by the far later statements found in the Mosaic books, instead of acting vice versa. The “chosen people” have been fond at all periods of history of helping themselves to other people’s property. From the appropriation of the early history of Sargon, King of Akkad, and its wholesale application to Moses born (if at all) some thousands of years later, down to their “spoiling” the Egyptians under the direction and divine advice of their Lord God, the whole Pentateuch seems to be made up of unacknowledged mosaical fragments from other people’s Scriptures. This ought to have made Assyriologists more cautious; but as many of these belong to the clerical caste, such coincidences as that of Sargon affect them very little. One thing is certain: Izdubar, or whatever may be his name, is shown in all the tablets as a mighty giant ‘who towered in size above all other men as a cedar towers over brushwood — hunter, according to cuneiform legends, who contended with, and destroyed the lion, tiger, bull, and buffalo, the most formidable animals.
  • (TG) J. — The tenth letter in the English and Hebrew alphabet, in the latter of which it is equivalent to y, and i, and is numerically number 10, the perfect number (See Jodh and Yodh ), or one. (See also I
  • (TG) Jabalas {Sans}. Students of the mystical portion of the White Yajur Veda .
  • (TG) Jachin {Hebr}. In Hebrew letters IKIN, from the root KUN to establish, and the symbolical name of one of the Pillars at the porch of King Solomon’s Temple [w.w.w.].
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